Humanities

Bimonthly magazine providing review of notable humanities projects and developments.

Articles from Vol. 25, No. 1, January/February

2003 Save America's Treasures Grants
IN ADDITION TO THE George Eastman House project, eight other NEH projects have been funded through the Save America's Treasures program, administered in partnership with the President's Committee on the Arts and the Humanities, the National Endowment...
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Editor's Note
NATIONAL HUMANITIES MEDALS"It's an odd word, humanities," John Updike says. "Science gives us so much of our sense of what we are. There still is a territory that only fiction can touch. No scientist can quite describe the sensations of being alive and...
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Forty Acres and a Mule: The Ruined Hope of Reconstruction
"RECONSTRUCTION WAS A FAILURE, BUT A splendid failure," says historian Leon Litwack.An NEH-supported documentary provides a new examination of the twelve years that followed the Civil War, when America struggled to reunite and to extend rights to former...
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From Aaron to Zubly
The New Georgia Encyclopedia Goes OnlineBaseball player Hank Aaron and a Calvinist revolutionary named John Zubly tell Georgia's story from A to Z in the New Georgia Encyclopedia. When the encyclopedia goes online on February 12, it will be the first...
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From the Rainforest: Rescuing an Altar from Looters
The ruins at Cancuen were considered of minor interest until 1999, when archaeologist Arthur Demarest stumbled through a tangle of trees and vines at the site and sank to his armpits. he realized that the hilltop was in fact the top story of ah enormous...
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How Our Great-Grandparents Saw the Movies
WHEN MOVING PICTURES left the penny arcade and were shown in theaters, they were done in short segments in a constant loop. Customers paid a nickel to watch as long as they liked.A decade later saw the arrival of the feature film. Nickelodeons still...
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Incidents in the Life of an Abolitionist
WILL BE GIVEN FOR THE APPREHENSION AND DELIVERY OF MY SERVANT GIRL HARRIET SHE IS A LIGHT MULATTO, 21 YEARS OF AGE, ABOUT 5 FEET 4 INCHES HIGH, OF A THICK AND CORPULENT HABIT, HAVING ON HER HEAD A THICK COVERING OF BLACK HAIR THAT CURLS NATURALLY, BUT...
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In Focus
Stories Behind the DocumentsMichael Gillette of TexasInside Michael L. Gillette's garage sits the same car he drove in high school-a 1963 Chevrolet convertible in mint condition. As the new executive director of the Texas Council for the Humanities,...
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Key Ingredients: The History of Food in America
HOT chocolate was introduced ABI into California in the eighteenth century by Franciscan missionaries from Mexico. The potato chip was invented to satisfy a customer weary of soggy fried potatoes at the Moon Lake Resort in Saratoga Springs, New York....
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Recipes for an Expedition
MERIWETHER LEWIS AND WILLIAM CLARK WROTE ABOUT FOOD NEARLY EVERY DAY WHILE TREKKING WESTWARD BETWEEN 1803 AND 1806. MARY GUNDERSON, A CULINARY HISTORIAN, WILL BE SPEAKING ABOUT THE CORPS OF DISCOVERY'S VICTUALS IN THE MISSOURI HUMANITIES COUNCIL'S FOUR-EVENT...
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Scoundrels and Statesmen: The Study of Southern Politics
IN 1962 GEORGE WALLACE, THE FARM BOY FROM Barbour county, won Alabama's gubernatorial election with a landslide victory on a segregationist platform. Two decades and three terms later, after rejecting his racist past, Wallace entered his final term with...
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State by State
A ROUNDUP OF ACTIVITIES SPONSORED BY THE STATE HUMANITIES COUNCILSCOLORADOIn 1779, before he became the second president of the United States, John Adams wrote to his wife Abigail, "I am but an ordinary Man. The Times alone have destined me to Fame."...
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The National Humanities Medalists
Making a Difference"History is a moving target. We don't know where it's going to be next," says deep-sea explorer Robert Ballard. Each of the ten recipients of this year's National Humanities Medal, Ballard among them, is dedicated to the pursuit of...
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The Traditions of the Table
A Conversation with MARIO BATALICHAIRMAN BRUCE COLE TALKS WITH MARIO BATALI about the ways in which food conveys culture. Before becoming a chef, Batali studied medieval Spanish theater, witnessed the California food revolution, and lived in Italy to...
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