Humanities

Bimonthly magazine providing review of notable humanities projects and developments.

Articles from Vol. 22, No. 5, September/October

Editor's Note: The American West
"People stick to ranching," William Kittredge writes, "because they love the feel of a quick little horse moving intently after cattle, or the smell of greasewood after summer rain or new-cut alfalfa on a spring morning, or the stretch of damp rawhide...
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Excavating the Delta
An Ancient Cemetery Yields Clues to Cambodia's Past At twenty-seven hundred miles, the Mekong River is one of the world's longest rivers. It flows through China, Burma, Laos, Thailand, Cambodia, and Vietnam, and its delta is one of world's great ricegrowing...
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Images of Contentment: Kensett's Landscapes
In the last five years of his life, John Kensett shifted his focus from the Western frontier to the frontier in his own backyard. For decades, the wilds of Colorado, the cascading Niagara Falls, and the winding Hudson River had dominated the American...
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In Focus: Michael Bouman of Missouri
AS DIRECTOR OF THE MISSOURI Humanities Council, Michael Bouman likes to pose this question to prospective grantees: "What would you do for your community if a catastrophe leveled this facility and eliminated the entire collection of objects and things?"...
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In Their Own Words: Workers Tell Their Stories
AS TECHNOLOGY CHANGES THE WORKPLACE, Henry Ford to understand its effect on workers today and its meaning Community College instructors are collecting oral histories for them tomorrow. WHEN PATTERN MAKER Carl Fischer noticed his co-workers at the Chrysler...
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Outgrowing Myths
WHEN WILLIAM KITTREDGE TALKED RECENTLY WITH NEH CHAIRMAN WILLIAM R. FERRIS, THE CONVERSATION TURNED TO THE WEST THAT IS EMERGING FROM THE MYTHOLOGY OF THE OLD. KITTREDGE IS THE AUTHOR OF SEVERAL BOOKS, AMONG THEM WHO OWNS THE WEST AND HOLE IN THE SKY....
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People of the Rivers
AS ONE LEGEND TELLS IT, SPOKANE SAT ON A LAKE THAT WAS ONE DAY sucked into the "Below World" until the merciful mountains looked down and melted the winter snows into a river, making the area habitable. The creation story is one of a dozen featured in...
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Remembering Eudora Welty
WHEN WRITER EUDORA WELTY passed away in July at the age of ninety-two, she left behind a sympathetic, but sharp-eyed vision of the American South at mid-century. Although she rarely modeled her stories on real people, she looked for inspiration in the...
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Small Libraries Get Books
NOTEWORTHY Eight hundred and two small libraries across the country have received fifty recently published volumes of The Library of America series as part of a partnership program between the American Library Association, The Library of America, and...
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State by State
A Roundup of Activities Sponsored by State Humanities Councils ALABAMA The Alabama Humanities Foundation Resource Center has mounted a traveling exhibition, "Alabama Farmsteads: Our Changing Heartlands," with a stopover scheduled at the Museum of Gulf...
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Storylines America
"I DON'T LIVE IN A TEEPEE, contrary to some people's belief in the East, but much like the character in the book, I live by the jocko River and from time to time, I look upstream and wonder what the world will hold and I look downstream and wonder where...
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The Making of a Museum: How Henry Walters Brought Art to Baltimore
In 1931, Henry Walters left his art collection, numbering twentytwo thousand pieces, to the city of Baltimore. The result was the Walters Art Museum, which reopens its permanent installations this fall after three years of renovations. With support from...
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The Temple and Its Poem: Deciphering Angkor Wat
according to the poem inscribed on its walls, the temple at Angkor Wat was not built by humans, but by celestial architects commanded by Indra, chief of the gods. Indra had brought his beloved, half-human son up to heaven to live with him. The son was...
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Through the Eyes of Children
As America changed from a rural to an urban society in the last century, the lives of its children changed. A new website in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, tells childrens' stories in their own words. They remember their parents and uncles coming to this country...
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Water Shed
AT THE LEGACY OF SEVEN STATES COLORADO AT THE LEGACY OF THE COLORADO Of the ur basic elements once believed to make up the universe-earth, air, fire, and water-water may be the one most often taken for granted, says oral historian and folklorist Jack...
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Write 'Em Cowboy
TO SOME, "COWBOY POETRY" might be considered an oxymoron. Singing cowboys such as Roy Rogers and Gene Autry may be familiar, but men on horseback reciting verse? These days, a renaissance of cowboy poetry is under way. For the past ten years ranchers...
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