Humanities

Bimonthly magazine providing review of notable humanities projects and developments.

Articles from Vol. 25, No. 5, September/October

A Penny for a Song
Broadsides Give a Glimpse of Nineteenth-Century Popular CultureFOLKLORIST Kenneth S. Goldstein scoured antique stores, private sales, and trade shows-any place with old paper, his wife says-with one goal in mind: to locate broadsides. Thin, inexpensive...
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Bronzeville Blues
"Everybody always tries to put race in music. There's no race in music. The Blues is blue. You have the Blues, I have the Blues, everybody," says Gregg Parker, founder of the Chicago Blues Museum. "It's an American art form. It's one music. It's for...
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DAZZLING Magical SPECTACULAR Madcap BROAD WAY
WHEN FLORENZ ZIEGFEED ARRIVED IN NEW YORK City looking for an act for the Chicago world's fair, there were no theaters north of 42nd Street. But further down on Broadway, he found comedy acts from vaudeville, black-face minstrel shows, and European-style...
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Good Teacher and a Willing Student
U.S. Secretary of Education Rod Paige talks about the ingredients for success in our schools.NEH Chairman Bruce Cole recently spoke with secretary of Education Rod Paige about closing the gaps in the nation's education system. Paige, who was born in...
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Hawai'i's Bob Buss
BOB BUSS KEEPS A WOODBLOCK ON HIS OFFICE wall to remember the Confucian virtue Jen: it combines the sign for "man" and the sign for "two" to convey the notion of "human heartedness" and "man in society.""Whenever two persons meet, something akin to humanities...
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Landmarks in Life
With Brown v. Board of Education marking its fiftieth anniversary this year, U.S. secretary of Education Rod Paige talks about progress in the nation's schools since desegregation.His own childhood in Mississippi was a different world from today, Paige...
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State by State
ARIZONAIn conjunction with National Humanities Month this October, the Arizona Humanities Council will host the fourteenth annual Lorraine W. Frank Lecture in the Humanities, a free event to be held in Cline Library Auditorium on the Northern Arizona...
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The Legacy of the Dance Master Jerome Robbins
CHOREOGRAPHER Jerome Robbins put dance at the center of the American musical. When Agnes De Mille choreographed Oklahoma! in 1943, she revolutionized musical theater by making ballet and modern dance part of the character and plot development. Yet even...
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THE LOST CITY of CAHOKIA
Ancient Tribes of the Mississippi Brought to LifeTHE CITY OF CAHOKIA, IN MODERN-DAY ILLINOIS, HAD A population of twenty thousand at its pinnacle in the 1300s. With pyramids, mounds, and several large ceremonial areas, Cahokia was the hub of a way of...
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The Medici of the New World
IN 1923, THE COLLECTOR ALBERT C. BARNES agreed to show some of his recent acquisitions at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. There were paintings by Matisse and Derain, Soutine and Modigliani, Picasso, Utrillo, de Chirico and Laurencin, as well as...
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Urban Sensibilities: A New Approach to Stage Design
THE BOSTON OPERA Company's production of Pelléas et Mélisande on January 10, 1912 showcased the first set designs in America by Viennese artist Joseph Urban. "Nothing like them has ever been seen in any opera on the American stage," wrote Henry Taylor...
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Virtual Trowel: Learning about Archaeology Online
IN DECEMBER, STUDENTS AND ARCHAEOLOGY ENTHUSIASTS ALIKE will be able to catch a glimpse of a real archaeological dig-online. The Old Pueblo Archaeology Center is building an interactive website called the "Web of Archaeology.""This website will be set...
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