Humanities

Bimonthly magazine providing review of notable humanities projects and developments.

Articles from Vol. 24, No. 5, September/October

A Bumper Crop of Literary Events
"WE WERE FAMISHED FOR SOMETHING read," writes Cranville Stuart, a miner and cattle owner who became the Montana state librarian in the late 1800s. When he and his brother heard of a man with a trunk full of books, they traversed one hundred and fifty...
A Roundup of Activities Sponsored by the State Humanities Councils
ARIZONAThe Burton Barr Public Library in Phoenix will host the Lorraine W. Frank Lecture on October 30. Awards for Distinguished Public Scholar, Distinguished Organization, and Friend of the Humanities will be presented at the event. The keynote speaker...
Foot Soldier of Civilization a Conversation with Vartan Gregorian
Life on the front line of learning was the topic when NEH Chairman Bruce Cole spoke recently with Vartan Gregorian, president of Carnegie Corporation of New York and former president of Brown University. Gregorian raised $400 million to save the New...
Freedom's Course: Abraham Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation
"I AM NATURALLY ANTISLAVERY," said Abraham Lincoln early in his career. "If slavery is not wrong, nothing is wrong. I cannot remember a time when I did not so think, and feel." Yet Lincoln was not an abolitionist in the years leading up to the Civil...
Heroes of the Sky
"Learning the secret of flight from a bird was a good deal like learning the secret of magic from a magician. After you know what to look for you see things that you did not notice when you did not know exactly what to look for."-ORVILLE WRIGHTNOT WITHIN...
Marion Cott: Building Community in Kansas
We're not all Dorothy and Toto and Carrie Nation with an axe!" says Marion Cott, executive director of the Kansas Humanities Council. "There's a lot more to Kansas than that. We sometimes forget that in 1854, when the territory opened and settlers were...
Muse of the Shadowy Realms
WHEN HE DIED AT THE ACE OF FORTY-SIX, HOWARD PHILLIPS LOVECRAFT was convinced he was a literary failure. His peculiar tales had found homes only in pulp fiction magazines, and his autobiography, published posthumously, was subtitled "Some Notes on a...
Noteworthy
ALERT FOR APPLICANTSBeginning October 1, all federal grant programs will require institutional applicants to provide a DUNS number, which is issued by Dun & Bradstreet. Project directors should contact their institution's grant administrator or chief...
Picturing Modern America
Students practice doing history the way historians do.FROM THE INVENTION of the telephone and moving pictures to the gas-powered automobile and the first flight at Kitty Hawk, the world expanded between 1880 and 1920 at an unprecedented speed. "It's...
Planes, Trains, and Automobiles
"When Raymond Loewy and the century were young, the look of life was different," a journalist once said. "Everyday objects were bulky, colors were dowdy and machines bristled with ungainly protuberances."Modern advertising and industrial design would...
Protecting the Past
THE NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES has launched an initiative to preserve and document cultural resources in Iraq's archives and museums. Up to $500,000 will be awarded in grants to support conservation and cataloging of Iraq's collections, digitization...
Raymond Loewy's Designs in Motion
Loewy was the first designer to appear on the cover of Time. He worked the press with skill. He knew how to get attention with arresting predictions about the future and madcap suggestions, such as painting the Eiffel tower blue or improving New York...
The Art of Rice
IN JAVA THEY CALL HER DEWI SRI. In Bengal, she is the Hindu goddess Annapurna, and in Japan, one out of four shrines is dedicated to her. Rituals honoring the "Rice Mother," the goddess of the sacred grain, are prevalent throughout Asia. For centuries,...
The Infinite Highway of the Air
The images are scratchy, a bit pallid to the eye. . . . A fragile-looking biplane comes straight at the camera and a dark, blurred figure runs alongside. The scene is late morning on a scraggy piece of the North Carolina coast-historians later placed...
Tin Lizzies to T-Birds
MotoretteJUST WHAT EVERY WOMAN NEEDSTeaching Technology and the Humanities OnlineAMERICANS HAVE ALWAYS identified the power to move as a critical vector of broader social and political power," writes Virginia Scharff, professor of history at the University...