Humanities

Bimonthly magazine providing review of notable humanities projects and developments.

Articles from Vol. 33, No. 1, January/February

Around the Nation
A Roundup of Activities Sponsored by the State Humanities CouncilsARIZONA"Transitions" photographic exhibition opens at the University of Arizona's Center for Middle Eastern Studies in Tucson on Jan. 19.The Loft Cinema in Tucson presents the Human Rights...
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Big Sky Oasis
MONTANA JEFF BIRKBY, A GEOTHERMAL ENERGY specialist for Montana, was charged with the task of investigating water use of the state's hot springs. But, in 1979, when he visited the springs concentrated in the southwestern part of the state, he became...
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Calendar: Endowment-Supported Events
January/FebruaryFamed painting The Resurrection of Lazarus crosses the Atlantic for the first time for "Henry Ossawa Tanner: Modern Spirit/' opening at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in Philadelphia on January 28. The exhibit showcases over...
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Curio
CROWNING ACHIEVEMENTFifteenth-century French painter Jean Fouquet was a curious artist - curious, that is, in the late Middle Ages take on the word. "Curiosity" in those times could refer simply to interests in décor but had a further connotation relating...
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Dating Fashionable Middle-Aged People
Iluminating Fashion: Dress in the Art of Medieval France and the Netherlands, 13251515 is like many medieval storybooks. It has knights and ladies, kings and castles, fantastic and fearsome beasts, pageantry and romance. It tells a story of two hundred...
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Deaf Meets Wonderstruck
One night while flipping through television channels, children's book author Brian Selznick chanced upon Through Deaf Eyes, an award-winning PBS documentary that traces the history of Deaf culture and education in America. Selznick remembers that his...
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Editor's Note
In these pages, I keep noticing these startling moments in life when everything changes, and seemingly incidental details of individual biography give birth to great assertions of personal commitment. It's something in the realm of what Friedrich Nietzsche...
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Impertinent Questions WITH PAUL D. HALLIDAY
Don your best wig. Court is now in session. For this edition of Impertinent Questions, we talk to Paul D. Halliday, author of Habeas Corpus: From England to Empire (Harvard University Press, 20 1 0). Halliday, a professor of history at the University...
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Incognito in the Infantry
MISSISSIPPI THERE IS NO GRAVESTONE MARKING THE final resting place of Cathay Williams. Nor is there one for her alter ego, Private William Cathey, who served with the 38th Infantry on the western frontier from 1866 to 1868. But for a smattering of newspaper...
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In Focus: Alabama's Bob Stewart
WHEN A MILE-WIDE TORNADO PLOWED THROUGH TUSCALOOSA last spring, Bob Stewart felt the loss personally - and professionally.A few days after the storm, he wandered through his childhood neighborhood and was shocked at how a slice of this thriving community...
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"Moving and Memorable": The Complete Poems of Philip Larkin
STARTED WRITING POEMS IN 1938 when he was fifteen or sixteen and very nearly stopped about ten years before he died at sixty-three. His reputation, during his lifetime, was based almost entirely on three collections published at intervals of approximately...
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On the Brain
NEUROSCIENCE is hot these days. The appeal of its explicatory promise - to reveal the electrochemical mechanisms undergirding such familiar, yet (for now) mysterious, phenomena as memory, attention, and decision-making - seems almost irresistible. Or,...
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Public Parking
It is impossible to envision what our designed landscapes would look like if Frederick Law Olmsted Sr. had not needed a job in 1857. Born in Hartford in 1822, with Connecticut roots that stretched back to 1636, the father of American landscape architecture...
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The Racing Life
KENTUCKY IN OPULENT CZARIST RUSSIA, THE AFRICANAmerican jockey Jimmy Winkfield found that his skin color made him a curiosity in horse racing circles. A two-time Kentucky Derby winner, Winkfield had fled the United States at the height of his career...
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The Right to Love
THEY WERE YOUNG, THEY WERE IN LOVE, THEY GOT MARRIED. SIMPLE. But this was Virginia in 1958 and nothing was simple.The groom, twenty-four-year-old Richard Loving, was your average Joe - a country guy who loved music and drag racing on weekends. He had...
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Unhappy Camper
Kurt Vonnegut and the dyspeptic tradition in American lettersIf you want your child to be a writer, go bankrupt.The evidence confirms it. Failing that, at least suffer a severe financial reversal, obliging your son or daughter to endure the social opprobrium...
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Zeromski: The Magnificent!
NOT EVERY GREAT WRITER IS BLESSED WITH AN INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION. Stefan Zeromski, who lived and wrote in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Poland, created superb novels and yet is little known in the Englishspeaking world. His limited reputation...
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