Humanities

Bimonthly magazine providing review of notable humanities projects and developments.

Articles from Vol. 19, No. 3, May/June

America Goes to War
This year marks the one-hundredth anniversary of the Spanish-American War, which capped off a decade of soulsearching about America's role in the world. By the end of it, the United States had acquired the Philippines, Puerto Rico, and Guam from a defeated...
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Around the Nation: Maryland
Ruby-tongued eagles and swordbearing women adorn many of the oyster boats on the Chesapeake Bay. A new exhibition opening June 5 at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels examines the role of decorative boat carving in the folklore and daily...
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Editor's Note
AT THE TURN OF A CENTURY "There is something about the end of a century," historian H.W. Brands writes, "that sets people to thinking about their collective prospects and ultimate destiny." In this issue of Humanities, we look at Americans in that situation...
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Feathers and Bones
"For the ancients, mana was a quality that came from the gods and was necessary to make the world fruitful." EACH YEAR THOUSANDS OF SCIENTISTS, RESEARCHERS, AND VISITORS DELVE INTO THE TREASURES OF HAWAI'I'S BISHOP MUSEUM TO DISCOVER FACTS, BUT ALSO...
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How the Century Began: A Conversation with H.W. Brands
WHEN ENDOWMENT CHAIRMAN WILLIAM R. FERRIS TALKED RECENTLY WITH HISTORIAN H. W. BRANDS, THE CONVERSATION TURNED TO AMERICA AT THE TURN OF THE LAST CENTURY. WILLIAM FERRIS: Your new book on the United States in the 1890s has the title, The Reckless Decade....
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Jazz Tells Its Story on Film
MUSIC IS A LANGUAGE, says Larry Appelbaum, a jazz broadcaster and senior studio engineer in the Motion Picture, Broadcasting, and Recorded Sound Division of the Library of Congress. "Filmmaking is also a language. When you have a really good filmmaker...
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Letters from a Rough Rider
THE FOUR LETTERS OF SECOND LIETUTENANT JOSHUA D. CARTER SPAN LESS THAN TEN WEEKS, yet they reflect the most significant enters in the history of the Arizona Rough RIders. From training in San Antonio, Texas through Cuban combat, Carter offers an insider's...
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The Masked Image
Recapturing the Work of Reformer Jacog Riis JACOB AUGUSTUS Riis arrived in New York City from Ribe, Denmark in 1870 at the age of twentyone and endured seven years of erratic employment before finding steady work as a police reporter for the New York...
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The Money Bean
A working coffee farm on Hawai'i captures a segment of history "Those persons who are in pursuit of wealth would do well to plant coffee, for it is the same as money." -King Kamehameha The story of Hawai'i's coffee industry and the role played by newcomers...
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Tradition Comes to Light in a 20th-Century Space
Two thousand rare Native American objects, some of them unseen for a hundred years, go on exhibition in June at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh. They come from a collection of ten thousand objects that have lain in storage. The exhibition,...
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Vinalhaven Remembers: Its Great Age of Granite
Its Great Age Of Granite In the early twentieth century, the very bedrock of Maine was quarried-often by immigrant workers-and shipped to build courthouses, post offices, and temples of commerce throughout the United States. The state's granite industry,...
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Zion Lost and Found
The Soviet Quest for a Jewish Homeland Birobidzhan had its roots firmly in the improbable. It was to be a homeland for Jews in the far eastern corner the Soviet Union, a homeland that would be in the socialist mold, not religious. For a time, it was...
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