Humanities

Bimonthly magazine providing review of notable humanities projects and developments.

Articles from Vol. 27, No. 2, March/April

A Long Dark Journey into Light
IN THE LATE 1930s, AMERICAN playwright Eugene O'Neill was at the height of his career: three Pulitzer Prizes, a Nobel Prize, accolades, and financial success. By 1956, his star had fallen and his most acclaimed works, written years after the prize ceremonies,...
A Perfect Fit
The Garment Worker by Judith Weller sits at the corner of Seventh Avenue and 39th in Manhattan.THE BRONZE STATUE OF A larger-than-lifesize man sits on Manhattan's Seventh Avenue, hunched over his sewing machine, a yarmulke on his head. He symbolizes...
A Roundup of Activities
Sponsored by the State Humanities CouncilsALABAMABirmingham-Southern College in Birmingham will host its annual conference, "Writing Today" on March 10 and 11. Former United States Poet Laureate Rita Dove will accept the Grand Master award. Speakers...
Documenting Pittsburgh's Past
A photographer captures day-to-day life in an African American community.IN THE 1930s Pittsburgh's Hill District was "little Harlem," attracting performers like Count Basie and Sarah Vaughan to its clubs. It thrived for forty years and photographer Charles...
Editor's Note
PICTURING HISTORY"Photographs are, of course, artifacts," the social critic Susan Sontag once wrote. "But their appeal is that they also seem, in a world littered with photographic relics, to have the status of found objects-unpremeditated slices of...
In Focus: North Carolina's Doug Quin
"AS FAR BACKAS I CAN REMEMBER, I was exposed to different cultures, languages, art, and ways of thinking and of being in the world," says Doug Quin, executive director of the North Carolina Humanities Council.The son of a foreign service officer, Quin...
Life along the Erie Canal
The opening of the Erie Canal in October of 1825 was celebrated with the roar of gunfire. Guns ten miles apart fired one after the other, covering the 363-mile distance from Buffalo to New York City.A small flotilla of boats made the initial trip, with...
Reliving History Frame by Frame
Before television, newsreels informed a nation.Before there was television news, there were newsreels. They were short films shown in movie theaters between shows, ranging in length from five to ten minutes.Newsreels provided American audiences with...
Romare Bearden's IMPRINT
Romare Bearden came of age in Harlem in the 1920s. Frequent visitors to his home included writers, musicians, artists, and intellectuals, many who would become prominent figures of what is now called the Harlem Renaissance."He absorbed the incredible...
Through the Lens of JACK LONDON
Although known as a ... author of Call of the Wild also had a career as a photographer. His documentary work ... from the streets of San Francisco to the South Seas.(ProQuest Information and Learning: ... denotes obscured text omitted.)Just before dawn...
Uncharted Territory
A Conversation with Vinton CerfNEH Chairman Bruce Cole talked recently with one of the Fathers of the Internet, Vinton G. Cerf. A recipient of the National Medal of Technology, Cerf is vice president and "chief Internet evangelist" for Google.BRUCE COLE:...
VIRTUAL St. Louis
Projecting the past into the presentThe year is 1850. A woman stands at the corner of two deserted streets, clutching the train of her green silk skirt. Behind her is the courthouse where the two trials of Dred Scott will help spiral the country toward...