Humanities

Bimonthly magazine providing review of notable humanities projects and developments.

Articles from Vol. 33, No. 6, November/December

Around the Nation
A Roundup of Activities Sponsored by the State Humanities CouncilsALABAMAMarty Olliff delivers a lecture on visual war propaganda in World War I at Tuscumbia's Tennessee Valley Museum of Art on Nov. 11. The presentation, a supplement to the museum's...
Bushwhackers and Jayhawkers
KANSAS OUTSIDE THE WATKINS COMMUNITY MUSEUM of History in Lawrence, crowds throng Massachusetts Street, the city's downtown thoroughfare, for a night of museumand gallery-hopping during the Final Friday art walk. A band plays in a parking lot across...
Calendar
Endowment-Supported EventsNovember/DecemberDuring the Great Depression, with World's Fairs in six American cities over the span of a decade, the U.S. became a fairgoing nation. The public encountered visions of the future as conceived by leading designers...
Celebrating FREEDOM
AS HE STOOD before hundreds of rapt listeners at the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, Congressman John Lewis took a moment to reflect on the opening passage of the Declaration of Independence. Echoing others who have spoken from the steps, he recited Thomas...
Children of the Dust
THE SOUTHERN PLAINS COULD HAVE STAYED WHAT they always had been: an expanse of grass - one hundred million acres of buffalo grass, western wheatgrass, blue grama, and hundreds of other species. That was what the environment could support, flora-wise....
Curio
CAGEY CAGE"I was afraid that my making a piece that had no sounds in it," said John Cage in an interview in 1973, "would appear as if I were making a joke." Continuing, he said, "I think perhaps my own best piece, at least the one I like the most, is...
Editor's Note
The architect Louis I. Kahn once pretended to ask a brick what it wanted to be. The answer came back, "an arch." Had the brick been more specific, it might have said, "a vaulted arch: like the ones Guastavino made." An immigrant from Barcelona, Rafael...
Fractures of 1812
MASSACHUSETTS "AT LEAST PEOPLE KNOW WHEN THE War of 1812 was fought," Peter Drummey jokes. A librarian at Boston's venerable Massachusetts Historical Society, Drummey is all too familiar with the limits of public awareness about the conflict: He spent...
Humboldt in the New World
ALEXANDER von HUMBOLDT'S JOURNEY to becoming the preeminent scientist of his day had many possible starting points. But July 16, 1799, the day that he, a Prussian naturalist, and his friend Aimé Bonpland, a French botanist, disembarked from the Pizarro...
Impertinent Questions
WITH RICHARD SI OTKINFor this edition of IQ, we're camping with the Army of the Potomac in Maryland and pacing the halls of the White House. Richard Slotkin's The Long Road to Antietam: How the Civil War Became a Revolution surveys the political and...
Oregon's Cara Ungar
In 1999, while completing work on her dissertation in cultural studies and rhetoric in Portland, Oregon, Cara Ungar decided to leave academia. She applied for a position as development director at Oregon Council for the Humanities. After a fascinating,...
Remarkable Radical: Thaddeus Stevens
STEVENS CARRIED THE RESOLUTELY DETERMINED SPIRIT OF A FIGHTER WITH HIM THROUGHOUT HIS LIFE.IN 1813, A YOUNG THADDEUS STEVENS WAS ATTENDING A SMALL COLLEGE IN Vermont. This was well before the time when good fences made good neighbors. Free-roaming cows...
The Evolution of Ole Miss
MISSISSIPPI "THE LAST TIME I WAS AT OLE MISS WAS IN 1962 and I will tell you I was more afraid at Ole Miss than I had been in Vietnam," Bob Schieffer once said.As a young reporter, Schieffer covered the matriculation of James Meredith, the first black...
The Image of a Writer
EARLY IN 1851, HERMAN MELVILLE'S FRIEND AND PUBLISHER Evert Duyckinck asked the author for a daguerreotype to publish in his magazine, The Literary World. Melville, then in the midst of writing a massive, rumbustious novel that would become MobyDick,...
Vaulting Ambition
IN 1904, the first line of the New York City subway system opened, built by the Interborough Rapid Transit (IRT) Company. The line's southernmost terminus was City Hall Station, an architectural showpiece intended to attract riders to the new subway....
Voyage to Freedom
SOUTH CAROLINA TWO LONG PULLS AND A JERK AT THE whistle cord: That produced the sound echoing in the dark salty air on May 13, 1862, as the CSS Planter stealthily glided against the tide of Charleston Harbor, passing Fort Sumter. This signal indicated...
When Bram Met Walt
Ever since Bram Stoker unleashed Dracula on readers in 1897, the undead have been stalking literary and pop culture with abandon. At first it was a slow trickle, as others imitated Stoker on the page, but once Hollywood sank its teeth into vampire mythology,...