School Psychology Review

School Psychology Review is a quarterly journal covering mental health and education. It is published by the National Association of School Psychologists. Editorial headquarters are based in Bethesda, Md.

Articles from Vol. 32, No. 1, Winter

Adolescent Suicide Prevention: School Psychologists' Acceptability of School-Based Programs. (General Articles)
Abstract. From a random sample of members of the 1996-1997 membership directory of the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP), school psychologists' acceptability ratings of three school-based programs for the prevention of adolescent...
Commentary: Addressing the Gap between Science and Practice in Children's Mental Health
In the mid 1700s, a British naval surgeon discovered the cure for scurvy, which would often so decimate the crews of sailing vessels that they would have to terminate their voyages and return to port in order to re-outfit their ships in human resources....
Commentary: Advancing Mental Health Science and Practice through Authentic Collaboration
As the article by Fantuzzo, McWayne, and Bulotsky (2003) indicates, it increasingly is recognized that research in the mental health field must include enhanced efforts to conduct work outside the laboratory and in collaboration with major stakeholders...
Commentary: Challenges of Forging Partnerships to Advance Mental Health Science and Practice
The article by Fantuzzo, McWayne, and Bulotsky (2003) describes a model for addressing the former U.S. Surgeon General's (USDHHS, 1999) priorities for improving mental health service delivery to our nation's children. The authors identify several elements...
Commentary: Participatory Action Research Leads to Sustainable School and Community Improvement
Fantuzzo, McWayne, and Bulotsky (2003) describe a collaborative community research program that aims to decrease the population incidence of child maltreatment and build preschool children's competencies. This university-community collaborative has...
Ethical and Professional Issues with Computer-Related Technology
Abstract. School psychologists have an ethical imperative to determine the ways computers can facilitate practice because of the potential to improve effectiveness and efficiency. At the same time, psychologists have a parallel imperative to consider...
Forging Strategic Partnerships to Advance Mental Health Science and Practice for Vulnerable Children
Abstract. The purpose of this article is to present a conceptual framework for advancing mental health science and practice for vulnerable children that is in accord with the Surgeon General's priorities for change. Three elements distinguish the framework...
Importance Ratings of Socially Supportive Behaviors by Children and Adolescents
Abstract. The frequency of students' social support has been investigated in the literature, but little research has examined the social validity or social importance of supportive behaviors for children and adolescents. In the present study, data...
Increasing Independent Seatwork: Breaking Large Assignments into Smaller Assignments and Teaching a Student with Retardation to Recruit Reinforcement. (Research into Practice)
Abstract. A withdrawal design was used to evaluate the effects of a multicomponent intervention on independent seatwork and student-teacher interactions in a student with mild mental retardation. During the intervention phase, long assignments were...
Promoting Children's Mental Health: Reform through Interdisciplinary and Community Partnerships
Abstract. Reforms that have been undertaken in the mental health system have significant implications for psychologists working in and with schools. This article introduces the special series in School Psychology Review on "Emerging models for promoting...
The Validity of the Penn Interactive Peer Play Scale with Urban, Low-Income Kindergarten Children
Abstract. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the Penn Interactive Peer Play Scale (PIPPS), a teacher-rating instrument of interactive play behaviors for early childhood, was valid for urban, low-income children in kindergarten. The...