The George Washington Journal of International Law and Economics

Articles from Vol. 32, No. 3, 2000

Does the World Need a New International Environmental Court?
In recent years, the limited success of enforcing rules of international environmental law against deviant states has led to calls for the creation of an international environmental court or tribunal (IEC) capable of issuing binding and enforceable decisions...
Environmental Justice without Borders: The Need for an International Court of the Environment to Protect Fundamental Environmental Rights
I. THE GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL CRISIS Over the five decades since the signing of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights,' the scope of fundamental human rights recognized under international law has evolved, and the traditional scope of genocide, war...
India's Right to Reclaim Cultural and Art Treasures from Britain under International Law
I. INTRODUCTION The fiftieth anniversary of Indian independence from British rule was marked by parades, goodwill visits, and celebrations throughout India and the rest of the world. This general good cheer, however, was accompanied by calls from Indians...
Regulation of the International Trade of Endangered Species by the World Trade Organization
I. INTRODUCTION The past decade has brought heightened awareness of the tension between free international trade and the protection of endangered species.1 The timing of this conflict can be attributed to two trends. In the international trade arena,...
The George Washington University Law School Conference on International Environmental Dispute Resolutions (April 15-17, 1999)
I. INTRODUCTION On April 15-17, 1999, the Third Annual Environmental Law Conference at The George Washington University (GWU) Law School brought together an extraordinary group of international environmental experts and interested parties to discuss...