Chicago Review

An international journal of literature, interviews, and reviews. For academic audiences.

Articles from Summer-Fall

An Interview with Richard Stern
Richard Stern was born in New York City in 1928, and led a peripatetic existence until his early thirties; he studied at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, Harvard, and the University of Iowa, lived in Europe, taught at the University...
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A Note on Peter Blegvad
The American artist Peter Blegvad was born in New York City in 1951 and now lives in London. His book of short stories and poems, Head Cheese, was published with Atlas Press in 1994; but he may be more familiar to audiences on both sides of the Atlantic...
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A Note on Robert Walser and the Robber (1925)
Robert Walser (1878--1956), the Swiss-German master of high modernist prose, was once so well known that Robert Musil, reviewing Franz Kafka's first book of stories, described Kafka as a "special case of the Walser type." Kafka was among Walser's contemporary...
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Astrud Guggenheim
Astrud Guggenheim managed to spend an hour or two at the In Company exhibition in the New York Public Library before the building was closed due to imminent inclement weather from Hurricane Floyd. While waiting among the wet pigeons for her lunch date...
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Claire Bateman's Poetry of Matter and Spirit
Claire Bateman published her second and third books of poetry almost simultaneously in 1998: Friction (Portland, Oregon: Eighth Mountain Press) and At the Funeral of the Ether (Greenville, South Carolina: Ninety-Six Press). Like most of us, Bateman...
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Cones
Lightly as the land is laid down is what a story was told of no footprints and nothing marring the surface of the earth was the story told, it was so light as the wind skimming over the surface of water, over barely rustled carrot tops or ferns barely...
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Inventing Carson: An Interview
Ciaran Carson is the author of seven books of poetry, most recently The Alexandrine Plan, translations from the sonnets of Rimbaud, Baudelaire, and Mallarme, and The Twelfth of Never. An accomplished musician, he has written a pamphlet on traditional...
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Living Dangerously: George De Huszar
I see him still: long angular face, curved aristocratic nose, ascot tucked into his shirt. Uncle George enters our house and pauses to kiss my hand. He is nearing forty, I am in pigtails. At dinner he places a silver cigarette case and an enameled...
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New York School
With a renewed focus on the New York School poets in recent years, and the poetry of the 1950s and 1960s more generally, there seems to have been a corresponding resurgence of interest in artistic collaborations. One might think of the collaboration...
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Synopses of Stories
* "The Belt of Power" not only keeps a guy's pants up, it transforms even a nobody into a raving egomaniac. * "The New Man" retires to a monastery where he so mortifies his flesh in penance for his sins that his body dematerializes & he becomes...
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