Afro-Americans in New York Life and History

A scholarly journal that presents original research on the life and history of African Americans in New York State. Issues such as race relations and racial attitudes are addressed. Includes reviews of books in the subject area. For students and academici

Articles from Vol. 33, No. 2, July

A Transnational Sense of "Home": Twentieth-Century West Indian Immigration and Institution Building in the Bronx
Caribbean immigration remains central to New York City's history, as more than a million migrants from various Caribbean territories have settled the city's neighborhoods from the turn of the twentieth century to the present. Furthermore, Caribbean...
Desegregating the Jim Crow North: Racial Discrimination in the Postwar Bronx and the Fight to Integrate the Castle Hill Beach Club (1953-1973)
On a brisk, bright afternoon in late March 1953, Anita Brown, a thirty-one year old housewife, left her apartment in the Bronx River Houses, boarded a city bus and traveled three miles southeast to the Castle Hill Beach Club (CHBC). She went to apply...
Developing Their Minds without Losing Their Soul: Black and Latino Student Coalition-Building in New York, 1965-1969
This essay focuses on late-1960s African American and Latino student coalition-building on two New York City campuses: Lehman College in the Bronx and City College of New York in Harlem. Based on oral histories, archival documents and printed sources,...
Histories and "Her Stories" from the Bronx: Excavating Hidden Hip Hop Narratives
Popular and academic understandings of the cultural production of hip hop tend to focus on the music as a site of misogyny, aggressive masculinity and rampant consumerism. Historical accounts of hip hop have privileged male narratives, stifling women's...
Introduction: The Bronx African American History Project (BAAHP) and Approaches to Scholarship About/for Black Communities
"I think that part of the (the black scholar's) responsibility is to help the people to see themselves in a new light, to see themselves not primarily as victims of America but as co-creators of the past, as co-creators of the present, and as...