Melbourne Journal of International Law

Melbourne Journal of International Law is a magazine specializing in law topics.

Articles from Vol. 11, No. 2, October

Feminist Reflections on the 'End' of the War on Terror
This article examines the range of arguments articulated to justify the use of force under the 'War on Terror'. The three key justifications for unilateral force directed against terrorist actors, pre-emptive force, implied authorisation and the use...
New Publications in International Law
I GENERAL INTERNATIONAL LAW James Crawford, Alain Pellet and Simon Olleson (eds), The Law of International Responsibility (Oxford University Press, 2010) ISBN 9780199296972. Duncan French, Matthew Saul and Nigel D White (eds), International Law...
Protecting Endangered Marine Species: Collaboration between the Food and Agriculture Organization and the CITES Regime
Multiple laws and institutions seek to address the increasing vulnerability of marine species. The separate treatment of species protection under the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species ('CITES'), and fisheries management and...
Protection of Cultural Property under International Criminal Law
One means by which states seek to protect both immovable and movable cultural property is through international criminal law. A detailed corpus of war crimes exists to safeguard such property from destruction and plunder in armed conflict. Some acts...
Redesigning the Architecture of the Global Financial System
During the great period of globalisation before the First World War, the international economy was based on global trade and global finance with monetary policy largely fixed under the gold standard. After the Second World War, a new international...
Secessions, Coups and the International Rule of Law: Assessing the Decline of the Effective Control Doctrine
Attempted secessions (for example, Kosovo and Somaliland) and coups d'etat (for example, Madagascar and Honduras in 2009) prompt contestation over whether or not legal status is to be conferred on local exercises of de facto authority. International...
Service Jurisdiction under International Law
The extraterritorial criminal jurisdiction that a state exercises over members of its armed forces and various civilians associated with the forces cannot be easily explained in terms of the traditional principles of state jurisdiction under international...
The (Re)turn to 'Soft Law' in Reconciling the Antinomies in WTO Law
This article seeks to broaden our understanding of how World Trade Organization member governments have turned once again to 'soft law' in the WTO. as they did under the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, in order to regulate difficult and complex...
UN Special Procedures - Reflections on the Office of UN Special Representative for Human Rights in Cambodia
This feature describes the experiences of the writer when serving (1993-96) as Special Representative of the Secretary-General of the United Nations for Human Rights in Cambodia. It responds to a public lecture by Professor Hilary Charlesworth critical...