JOPERD--The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance

The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance (JOPERD) is a monthly journal owned and published since 1896 by the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation & Dance (AAHPERD) headquartered in Reston, Va. JOPERD is AAHPERD's largest, most frequently published, and most wide-ranging periodical. It is AAHPERD's cornerstone journal, reaching 12,000+ members and subscribers, providing information on a variety of health, physical education, recreation and dance issues. Subscribers are professionals supporting those involved in physical education, leisure, fitness, dance, health promotion, sport and education—all specialties related to achieving a healthy lifestyle. The region covered by this journal is the US.Recent issues of JOPERD have included articles on teaching strategies, fitness, legal issues, assessment, dancing, teacher education, adapted physical education, leisure for older adults, the use of technology, and ethics and gender equity in sports and physical education. In January 2002, JOPERD featured an article on the benefits of physical exercise in reducing breast cancer risk. In April 2007, JOPERD ran a series of articles on obesity, including the mental aspects of obesity, early childhood obesity intervention and online sources of information on the epidemic. In October 2009, JOPERD included an article on the gender gap in youth sports, particularly in urban communities. This was based on the results of Go Out and Play: Youth Sports in America, a comprehensive study based on two nationwide surveys of youth sports participation. Michael T. Shoemaker is the Editor, and Laura Stecker is the Associate Editor. Contributing editors are Derrick Mears, Ferman Konukman, Thomas H. Sawyer and Susan F. Ayers.

Articles from Vol. 76, No. 2, February

Assessment of Students with Disabilities in Physical Education: Legal Perspectives and Practices
The former Health and Human Services Secretary, Tommy G. Thompson (2004), recently launched a new program to support good health and physical activity for the six million American children and youths who have disabilities. Called "I Can Do It, You...
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Attending the AAHPERD National Convention: A Guide for Faculty Advisors
Perhaps one of the best teaching tips for HPERD professionals is to attend the annual AAHPERD National Convention and Exposition. It remains one of the most valuable cross-disciplinary forums for the exchange of professional information and ideas and...
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Bicycle Safety: Sport Education Style
Although the benefits of regular physical activity are well-documented and very well known, Americans are still becoming more sedentary and obese. In 1996, the Surgeon General's report emphasized that even moderate amounts of physical activity can...
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Designing Appropriate Learning Tasks: The Environmental Management Model
One inappropriate practice commonly seen in physical education today is the use of static skill practice followed immediately by dynamic game play. For example, children in physical education might spend the first half of a lesson dribbling basketballs...
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Exercise, Diet May Prevent Dementia
The value of exercise for older adults' mental health has been known for some time (see "Aging Brain, Aging Mind: Physical Activity Benefits Both," JOPERD, October and November/December 1998). Now, three studies, published in the September 22 issue...
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Pedometers: Answers to FAQs from Teachers; Pedometers Offer an Attractive Means for Student Motivation and Program Accountability, but as with Any Innovation, Questions Abound
In Japan, pedometers are so popular that most households there now have several. While pedometers have not yet reached this level of popularity in the United States, the media commonly discuss monitoring physical activity with pedometers. This discussion...
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Peer-Grading Passes the Supreme Court Test
Owasso ISD v. Falvo United States Supreme Court 122 S. Ct. 934, 534 U.S. 426 February 19, 2002 It was a common practice in Oklahoma's Owasso Independent School District (ISD) to have students grade one another's daily assignments and announce...
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Perceived Competence, and Its Effect on Curriculum
When building curriculums, it seems that educators always try to fit as much as possible into a one-year span. They often struggle to decide what to include and what to leave out. The question they often ask is "What needs to be taught?" The question...
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Should Physical Educators Make Greater Use of Homework?
For years I have experimented with homework assignments with my elementary students, and aside from the occasional raised eyebrow or groan, the assignments have been worthwhile. As physical educators, we have a tendency to look for ways in which...
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The Landing Phase of a Jump Strategies to Minimize Injuries:"what Goes Up, Must Come Down," According to the Old Saying. the Problem Is That Athletes Often Train for the "Going Up," While Neglecting the "Coming Down"-And All Its Potential for Injury
Most people probably do not remember being coached to jump, or--more important--to land. Yet jump-landing sequences are common in many sports and have been implicated as critical factors in causing certain types of injuries. Research on jumping generally...
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Who Speaks for the Trees?
In Stewards of Access/Custodians of Choice, Dan Dustin tells a story that stirs me. He describes being alone as the sun rises after hiking to the top of Mt. Whitney. With hordes of people arriving, the magic of his experience wanes, and he begins his...
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