Clinical Psychiatry News

Clinical Psychiatry News is a monthly medical and psychiatry tabloid published since 1973 by the International Medical News Group. Subjects for Clinical Psychiatry News include psychology and psychiatry. The executive editor is Denise Fulton, and Gina Henderson is a senior editor.

Articles from Vol. 35, No. 7, July

Acne Care: First Assess Teen's Level of Concern
MIAMI BEACH -- Most teenagers believe that acne can be cured, but fewer than 10% of teens with acne see a dermatologist. That puts pediatricians and other primary care physicians on the front lines of acne treatment, Dr. Lawrence A. Schachner said...
Addiction Medicine Seeks ABMS Specialty Status
MIAMI -- The field of addiction medicine is preparing to take a major step to enhance its authority and expand its professional ranks. The American Society of Addiction Medicine plans to form a certification board and seek official recognition from...
Alliances with Patients Help Foster Adherence
NEW ORLEANS -- Adherence with medication regimens is poor among the mentally ill and tends to worsen as those patients age, but there are ways to help patients stick to their regimens, several speakers said at the annual meeting of the American Association...
Antidepressants May Lift Metabolic Syndrome Risk
SAN DIEGO -- Antidepressant use could be associated with an increased risk of metabolic syndrome among adult psychiatric inpatients, Stephen B. Woolley, D.Sc., reported at the annual meeting of the American Psychiatric Association. Dr. Woolley and...
Antioxidants Studied for Bipolar Disorder, Schizophrenia
PITTSBURGH -- Antioxidant treatment may represent a novel therapeutic approach for bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, Dr. Michael Berk said at the Seventh International Conference on Bipolar Disorder. Studies have suggested that oxidative stress...
Are Features of Schizotypal Disorder Protective?
SANTIAGO, CHILE -- Several pathophysiologic features of schizotypal personality disorder appear to protect against the emergence of the psychotic features of schizophrenia, according to Dr. Larry Siever, professor of psychiatry at Mount Sinai School...
Are Warnings on Antidepressants Backfiring?
Our ability to recognize and effectively treat mental health conditions has improved over the last 20 years. As a result, suicide rates across all age groups had been on a steady decline since the early 1990s. But recent data show a disturbing reversal...
Biomarker Could Track Alzheimer's Progression
SALZBURG, AUSTRIA -- The investigational Pittsburgh B compound that binds to cerebral [beta]-amyloid and is visible on positron emission tomography maintains its promise as a way to distinguish the elderly patients presenting with memory problems who...
Brain Enzyme May Help to Flag Severity of Traumatic Injuries
CHICAGO -- An enzyme found in brain cells may become the first bedside biomarker for assessing the severity of traumatic brain injury, according to Dr. Linda Papa. In a multicenter trial, levels of the enzyme ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase (UCH-L1)...
Brain Injuries Difficult to Diagnose in U.S. Troops
CAMP PENDLETON, CALIF. -- Brain injuries may be the most common wounds suffered by American troops in Iraq, but they can also be the most difficult to diagnose, Mark McDonough, Ph.D., said at an international conference on civilian and military combat...
Brief Scales Can Measure Dementia, Mental Illness: Each Battery Should Measure Patient's Memory, Executive Function, and Activities of Daily Living
NEW ORLEANS -- The dizzying array of scales available for measuring dementia and mental illness in the elderly can be whittled down to create an essential picture of an individual patient. Most importantly, these scales can be used to establish a baseline...
Build on Basic Strategies to Treat Trauma-Exposed Kids
HOLLYWOOD, CALIF. -- In treating children exposed to trauma, think about the DEFs once the ABCs are taken care of. That's the message Nancy Kassam-Adams, Ph.D., delivered at the annual meeting of the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies....
Cardiologists Err on Side of Caution in Stable CAD
WASHINGTON -- When it comes to recommending angioplasty for stable coronary artery disease, evidence can take a backseat to worry, guilt, and the fear of legal liability. "It appears that both cardiologists and primary care physicians [PCPs] have...
Child Psychiatrists, Others Seek Tobacco Tax to Fund SCHIP Expansion
Federal lawmakers have been called upon to approve a tobacco tax increase of 61 cents to fund an expansion of the State Children's Health Insurance Program by the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, the American Academy of Pediatrics,...
Chronic Headache Linked to Depression, Not Obesity
BOSTON -- Chronic daily headache was not associated with obesity but was significantly associated with depression in a study of more than 300 neurology patients in Brazil. The lack of an association between obesity and headache in the Brazilian...
CMS Proposes Medicare Advantage Changes
Officials at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services are proposing changes to the Medicare Part D prescription drug plans and Medicare Advantage plans in an effort to strengthen oversight of the programs. The proposal includes mandatory self-reporting...
Collaborative, Evidence-Based Approach Encouraged for Depression
CHICAGO -- The development of guidelines to treat depression in the elderly using evidence-based research is important, said a panel of experts at a joint conference of the American Society on Aging and the National Council on Aging. However, inadequate...
Co-Occurring Mental Illness: Early Intervention Matters
MIAMI -- Co-occurrence of mental health and substance use disorders is a substantial problem among American adolescents, Jorielle R. Brown, Ph.D., said at the annual conference of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. Many teenagers go untreated...
Criteria Inadequate for Postconcussional Disorder
SANTA FE, N.M. -- The suggestions for diagnosing postconcussional disorder that appear in the text revision of the DSM-IV are inadequate for the assessment of mild traumatic brain injury, Dr. Stephen D. Anderson said at the annual meeting of the American...
Cultural Competency Key in End-of-Life Care
SAN DIEGO -- Counseling patients about end-of-life care is often a difficult task, but it can be more complicated when the patient has an ethnic or cultural background that differs from your own. Asking open-ended questions about the patient's concerns...
Dealers, Friends, Family Are Key Drug Sources for Opioid Abusers
NEW ORLEANS -- Most opioid abusers report that they get their drugs from dealers, friends, and relatives, according to a survey of individuals entering methadone maintenance treatment programs. But prescriptions from physicians still rank third...
Depression, Anxiety Take Toll on Cardiac Rehab
WASHINGTON -- Depressed or anxious patients who are referred to cardiac rehabilitation programs are significantly more likely to comply poorly or have a poorer outcome than are patients without the conditions, Angele McGrady, Ph.D., reported at the...
Depression Rates May Reach 30% in Transformed Migraine
CHICAGO -- Depression prevalence may be as high as 30% in transformed migraine, according to a preliminary analysis of the American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention study presented on June 8 at the American Headache Society meeting. By contrast,...
Depression Tied to 36% Increased Risk of MI
NEW ORLEANS -- Depression is common among patients with heart failure and is independently associated with poor outcomes, Dr. Aldo P. Maggioni said at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology. He presented a retrospective study involving...
Dissociation Alters Neural Activation Patterns in Borderline
SANTIAGO, CHILE -- People with borderline personality disorder show altered neural activation in response to aversive stress, Dr. Christian Schmahl said at an international congress sponsored by the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry....
Don't Overlook Infrequent Adolescent Smokers for Cessation Counseling
AUSTIN, TEX. -- Adolescents who smoke infrequently or occasionally are prime candidates for smoking cessation counseling, Kathleen A. Kealey said in a poster presentation at the annual meeting of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. ...
Drug Use, Sexual Behavior Surveyed
More than one in five of U.S. adults aged between 20 and 59 years have experimented with cocaine or other street drugs during their lifetime, according to a new study released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for...
Evidence-Based Medicine Does Not Support Cholinesterase Inhibitor Use
CARMEL, CALIF. -- The evidence for using cholinesterase inhibitors in patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease "is pretty darned poor," Dr. Laura Mosqueda said at the Western regional meeting of the American Federation for Medical Research. She...
Factor in Triglyceride When Assessing Patients' Visceral Fat
BARCELONA -- Combining waist circumference with fasting triglyceride measurements can help physicians tell whether their patients are carrying visceral fat--which increases diabetes risk--or subcutaneous fat, which does not, Dr. Jean-Pierre Despres,...
FDA Proposes New Limits on Advisers with Conflicts
The Food and Drug Administration is proposing to beef up its conflict-of-interest guidelines for experts who serve on its advisory committees, the agency announced in a teleconference. Proposed guidelines would bar experts with stock or other financial...
First Transdermal Drug OK'd for Parkinson's
For the first time, a transdermal drug delivery system is available for treating Parkinson's disease patients, a treatment option that provides both practical and theoretical benefits for this population, according to experts not involved in clinical...
For Anxiety, Look beyond Status Quo Drugs: Augmentation Most Commonly Involves Atypicals; Benzodiazepines or Buspirone; and Anticonvulsants
Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are first-line pharmacotherapy for most patients with generalized anxiety disorder and social anxiety disorder, but a substantial number of patients need more....
For Patients, Parent Advocacy Matters
Many people believe that the most daunting tasks in navigating the mental health system are the fights for access to care and to get insurance companies to pay. I readily admit those fights are formidable, but in my opinion, the hardest thing of all...
Four Reinforcers Predict School Refusal Behavior
ST. LOUIS -- Problematic family functioning merges with children's perceptions of positive and negative reinforcements to produce school refusal behavior, according to research presented at the annual conference of the Anxiety Disorders Association...
Genes May Explain Some Depression after Fracture
NEW ORLEANS -- New-onset depression after hip fracture is fairly common and may be explained in part by certain polymorphisms of the serotonin 1A and 2A receptors, Dr. Eric J. Lenze said in a poster presented at the annual meeting of the American Association...
Health Care Challenges Similar around World
WASHINGTON -- The globalization of health care is creating challenges for health care systems worldwide. Though the systems themselves may be very different in terms of financing and administration, the problems they must address--aging populations,...
Helping Female Inmates Heal from the Inside
Most women incarcerated in the United States are in trouble long before the door on their prison cell slams shut. According to the U.S. Department of Justice's Bureau of Justice Statistics, at year end 2005, 107,518 women were in U.S. federal or...
Helping OCPD Patients Break Free
Making a breakthrough with a patient with obsessive-compulsive personality disorder can be daunting. But once you begin to evaluate the patient's anxiety or depressive symptoms and the patient begins to describe in exquisite detail the events of...
In a New Book, Dr. Jerome Groopman Argues That the Way Doctors Think Undermines Medical Education. Is He Right? What Steps Can Be Taken to Improve Medical Education?
The book, "How Doctors Think" (New York: Houghton Mifflin Co., 2007), made me think about the great difficulty that medical education has in conveying the process side of diagnosis and treatment, which are seriously wrapped up in the doctor/patient...
Industry and Psychiatry: Physician, Heal Thyself
The current relationship between the pharmaceutical industry, medical researchers, and clinicians is driven by a combustible mix of professional values and market incentives. As the business side of medicine becomes exposed both in the popular media...
In Pursuit of an Ethical State of Mind
What do Billy Joel, Maimonides, Hillel, Kenny Rogers, and Mother Teresa have in common? Besides being immensely well known and popular in their time, they are all part of a ritual I use to get into an ethical state of mind. You may be familiar with...
Intervention Helps Smokers with Psychotic Disorders
AUSTIN, TEX. -- Despite a generally low rate of participation in smoking-cessation programs among persons with psychotic disorders, cessation intervention is effective in this population, at least in the short term, Amanda Baker, Ph.D., said at the...
Irritability, Aggression Rule in Early Bipolar
NEW YORK -- Significant differences are apparent in the rates of mania and types of externalizing comorbidity between children, adolescents, and adults with bipolar disorder, Dr. Gabrielle A. Carlson reported at a psychopharmacology update sponsored...
Lamotrigine, Lithium Effective-For a While
PITTSBURGH -- Lamotrigine and lithium perform similarly well in preventing depressive or manic episodes in patients with bipolar disorder, but neither drug remains effective as monotherapy beyond 5 years, Dr. Rasmus W Licht reported at the Seventh...
Maker of Weight-Loss Drug Pulls Application
Soon after the Food and Drug Administration's Endocrinologic and Metabolic Drugs Advisory Committee voted unanimously against recommending approval of the weight-loss drug Zimulti, Sanofi-Aventis withdrew its new drug application, saying it needed...
Many at Risk for Undiagnosed Bipolar Disorder
PITTSBURGH -- About one out of seven of patients who are diagnosed with unipolar depression have experienced manic symptoms within the last year and are likely to actually have bipolar disorder, Kevin Nanry of GlaxoSmithKline and coauthors reported...
Maternal Depression Predicts ADHD in Kids
BOSTON -- A diagnosis of maternal depression any time between 1 year before and 9 years after giving birth is a risk factor for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in school-age children, according to a study presented at a meeting of the Society...
Medical Leaders Double as Corporate Directors
TORONTO -- If accepting free pens or lunches from industry represents a potential conflict of interest for physicians, what do you call it when a medical school dean is also the corporate director of a large, for-profit health care company? "An...
Melanoma Cases Dip, but Other Data 'Alarming'
SANTA ANA PUEBLO, N.M. -- For the first time in about 25 years, the number of malignant melanoma cases in the United States has dropped, Dr. Darrell S. Rigel said at a meeting of the American Society for Mohs Surgery. According to data from the...
Metabolic Assessments Should Precede Atypicals
NEW YORK -- With increased use of atypical antipsychotics like olanzapine in managing bipolar disorder has come an increase in insulin resistance, weight gain, and elevated cardiovascular risk. Over the last decade, it has become clear that antipsychotics...
Migraine Associated with Psychiatric Disorders
CHICAGO -- Major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, panic disorder, and social phobia were diagnosed twice as often in those with migraine as in those without headache in a major Canadian population survey, Dr. Nathalie Jette said at the American...
Moderate Levels of Activity Benefit Overweight Postmenopausal Women
Even as little as 72 minutes of moderate physical activity per week--half the amount recommended by various national health groups--significantly improves cardiorespiratory fitness in previously sedentary overweight postmenopausal women. This finding...
Most College Students Use Stimulants on Occasion
MIAMI -- College is "ground zero" for nonmedical use of prescription stimulants. But most college students who use stimulants do so only on occasion to enhance studying or boost concentration. More frequent users are at increased risk for abusing...
Most Neuropathic Pain Patients on Combo See Improved VAS Scores
NEW ORLEANS -- Antidepressants and antiepileptics are both effective in treating neuropathic pain, but a combination performs best, according to Dr. Damon Robinson. Dr. Robinson and colleagues found that nearly 80% of patients who took a combination...
Neuroimaging as Tool for Diagnosis, Treatment in Sight: Identifying Bipolar Disorder Is a Priority
PITTSBURGH -- Neuroimaging may soon become an important clinical tool for the diagnosis and treatment of mood disorders, Dr. Mary L. Phillips said at the Seventh International Conference on Bipolar Disorder. Emerging data suggest that functional...
Obesity and Obstructive Sleep Apnea
The Question Last month, we examined the neurocognitive effects of obstructive sleep apnea in a patient with an elevated body mass index that was not to the result of muscle hypertrophy. What does the evidence show regarding the link between obesity...
One to Three Is a Critical Age Range for Obesity Development
TORONTO -- A critical period for the development of obesity in early childhood appears to be between the ages of 1 and 3 years, according to a study of inner-city youth presented at the annual meeting of the Pediatric Academic Societies. "Based...
Pain Called a Major Sign of Depression in Older Patients
SEATTLE -- Pain complaints are so common in older patients with depression, and vice versa, that pain can be used as a signal to pick up depression that would otherwise be missed, Dr. Sumer Verma said at the annual scientific meeting of the American...
Patients Surgically Assigned as Women May Face Depression
ORLANDO -- Genetic females with congenital adrenal hyperplasia and ambiguous genitalia who, as infants, were surgically corrected to a female phenotype had a lower feminine sexual role and a tendency toward depression as adults, based on extensive...
Perspective
The best way to deliver correctional health care is to have standards that spell out the relevant issues and include position statements that call attention to the unique needs of population subgroups, such as women and adolescents. The special...
Phenol-Rich Cocoa Beats Tea for Reducing Blood Pressure
Cocoa--but not tea--consumption appears to be associated with blood pressure reductions comparable with those achieved with a [beta]-blocker or an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor. That conclusion comes from a meta-analysis of 10 randomized,...
Preventing Gun Violence: We Must Act
Working in a trauma center at Loyola, I see gunshot victims often--I see the devastation that guns cause. As I was working with a medical student on a Grand Rounds presentation on gunshot violence, I came across some of the following information....
Psilocybin Results Inspire Researchers
SAN DIEGO -- A cadre of academics has begun conducting new research into the use of psychedelic drugs for mental illness; initial results are intriguing enough to warrant further exploration, several of the researchers said at a symposium at the annual...
Psychiatry Can Help Businesses Counter Toxic Leadership
CHICAGO -- The high-profile corporate scandals of the past decade have brought renewed interest in destructive and dysfunctional leadership and how it can be identified and mitigated, Dr. Vineeth P. John said at the annual conference of the Academy...
Psychological Injury Does Not Equal Disability
SANTA FE, N.M. -- Forensic assessment of psychological injuries must go beyond diagnosis and consider the effect on a person's ability to function, William J. Koch, Ph.D., said at the annual meeting of the American College of Forensic Psychiatry. ...
Severe Asthma Exacerbations Are Possible in Mild Disease
TORONTO -- Current classifications of pediatric asthma fail to capture the potential for severe exacerbations in patients with mild disease, according to Dr. Christopher Carroll of Connecticut Children's Medical Center in Hartford. In a study of...
Sexual Activity Continues into Old Age for Many
SEATTLE -- Sex remains an important part of life for seniors, with almost one-third of persons between the ages of 65 and 74 years continuing to have sex at least once a week, according to a survey of sexual behavior in seniors. "We hope that population-representative...
Small-Fiber Dysfunction May Underlie Pain
BETHESDA, MD. -- A growing body of research suggests that dysfunction of the small-fiber axons that mediate pain sensation and autonomic function underlies complex regional pain syndrome, Dr. Anne Louise Oaklander said at a meeting sponsored by the...
Suicide Attempts Linked to Dating Violence, Sexual Assault
Urban adolescent girls who have been hit or physically hurt by a boyfriend in the past year are 60% more likely to attempt suicide than those who have not, reported Dr. Elyse Olshen of Columbia University, New York, and her associates. For urban...
Suicide Bombers Don't Fit Psychological Profile
SANTA FE, N.M. -- Psychological profiling of suicide bombers will not work because they are a heterogeneous population and do not fit any diagnostic criteria for mental illness, Dr. Jamshid A. Marvasti said at the annual meeting of the American College...
Tamoxifen Reduces Mania in Bipolar Patients
PITTSBURGH -- Tamoxifen alleviated the symptoms of acute mania in patients with bipolar disorder in a small study, Dr. Carlos A. Zarate Jr. reported at the Seventh International Conference on Bipolar Disorder. The finding provides proof of concept...
Th1/Th2 Imbalance Affects Kynurenine in Schizophrenia
SANTIAGO, CHILE -- A Th1/Th2 immune imbalance affecting kynurenine metabolism may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia, Dr. Markus J. Schwarz said at an international conference sponsored by the World Federation of Societies...
The Art of Suzanne Edmiston Worrell
Suzanne Edmiston Worrell's creativity became apparent early. As a very young child, she made a stop-motion animated film, made flip books and clay sculptures, and carpeted--and even wallpapered--her Barbie's dollhouse. Today, Ms. Worrell's first...
Treating 'Invisible' Symptoms May Be Beneficial in Parkinson's
BOSTON -- Depression, anxiety, and sleep problems rather than disease explain why some patients with Parkinson's disease call their physicians more frequently than others, according to results of a study presented by Dr. Melissa J. Nirenberg in a poster...
Treating Obstructive Sleep Apnea Surgically May Improve ADHD
Surgical treatment of mild obstructive sleep apnea in school-aged children diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and mild obstructive sleep apnea resulted in big improvements in ADHD symptoms, compared with those treated with methylphenidate...
Using EMRs in the Inpatient Setting
The benefits of centralized electronic medical records are many: easy access, improved continuity of patient care, efficiency, legibility, and security. Yet there are roadblocks to widespread implementation of electronic medical records (EMRs)....
Video/EEG 'Test' Can Diagnose Pseudoseizures
SANTA FE, N.M. -- When a patient appears resistant to antiepileptic drugs and continues to have seizures, Dr. Alexander E. Obolsky recommends a pseudotest for pseudoseizures. Use real video/electroencephalography to record changes in brain activity,...
Video Training Tool Improves ADHD Symptoms in Teenagers
BOSTON -- Working memory training can significantly improve symptoms in adolescents receiving medical treatment for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, Dr. Bradley S. Gibson said in a poster presentation at a meeting of the Society for Research...
Waistline Can Predict Health Problems in Men
ANAHEIM, CALIF. -- A tape measure may be one of the most useful tools to predict whether male patients have diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, coronary artery disease, a large prostate, a high prostate-specific-antigen level, erectile dysfunction,...
Watch for Hypogonadism in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes
BARCELONA -- Consider measuring testosterone levels in all male type 2 diabetes patients with symptoms of hypogonadism, Dr. Eric Meuleman of the Free University Medical Center, Amsterdam, advised at an international congress on prediabetes and metabolic...
When Treating Insomnia, Consider Comorbidities
WASHINGTON -- Insomnia is a disorder of hyperarousal rather than one of sleep deprivation, Thomas Roth, Ph.D., said at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Clinical Psychiatrists. "Mothers of newborn babies don't have insomnia; they simply...
Work-Life Balance Essential to Staying Effective: One Powerful Risk Factor for Burnout Is an Organizational Culture That Reinforces Saying Yes
CHICAGO -- American physicians and their patients face a common enemy: work-related stress and burnout resulting from a conflict between work and everything else that's important, including family, friends, personal health, and spouses, Lt. Col. Steven...