Clinical Psychiatry News

Clinical Psychiatry News is a monthly medical and psychiatry tabloid published since 1973 by the International Medical News Group. Subjects for Clinical Psychiatry News include psychology and psychiatry. The executive editor is Denise Fulton, and Gina Henderson is a senior editor.

Articles from Vol. 38, No. 2, February

Antidepressants Beat Placebo Only for Very Severe Disease
The efficacy of antidepressant treatment over placebo for major depressive disorder "varies considerably," depending on symptom severity. Only patients whose depression is classified as "very severe" appear to have a greater benefit from antidepressants...
Antipsychotics' Onset of Action May Show Up after 2 Weeks
ISTANBUL, TURKEY -- The symptomatic response to risperidone after 2 weeks of treatment proved predictive of the later response--or lack of it--at 12 weeks in a randomized trial involving patients with schizophrenia. Results of this study support...
Can Nostalgia Lead to Clinical Depression?
By definition, nostalgia is a wistful desire to return in thought or fact to a former time in one's life--to one's home or homeland, or to one's family and friends. It is a sentimental yearning for the happiness of a former place or time. Perhaps...
CBT Alone Effective in ADHD/substance Abuse Trial
LOS ANGELES -- Psychostimulant treatment did not outperform placebo when structured cognitive-behavioral therapy was integrated into the treatment of adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and substance use disorders. In a 16-week,...
Changes in Brain May Herald Dementia in PD: A Decrease in the Volume of the Hippocampus Could Predict Which Patients Will Progress to Dementia
MIAMI BEACH -- Changes in brain volume and networks could someday predict which patients with Parkinson's disease are at highest risk to develop dementia, according to recent studies. It has been known for some time that hippocampal atrophy, for...
Combat Tied to New-Onset PTSD, Comorbidities
ATLANTA -- Combat deployments are difficult and stressful, and might be the primary driver of postdeployment mental health symptoms, including new-onset posttraumatic stress disorder, suggests an ongoing study of more than 55,000 military personnel....
Cravings Complicate Withdrawal from Methamphetamine
LOS ANGELES -- Persistent cravings, as opposed to a difficult struggle with withdrawal, are likely responsible for the grip of methamphetamine on addicted individuals who want to quit, according to results of an inpatient study presented at the annual...
Daily Headache Occurs in 20% after Blasts
PHILADELPHIA -- About 20% of soldiers who return from deployment in Iraq or Afghanistan develop chronic daily headache after blast exposure or concussion, according to data from a preliminary study. Dr. Brett Theeler and his colleagues found that...
Data Weak on Noncancer Opioid Use
One of the first systematic reviews of data on long-term use of opioids found weak evidence to support the idea that adults who can take chronic opioids get chronic pain relief, though effects on function or quality of life are unclear. In a Cochrane...
Dissociation after Cardiac Surgery
Recently, several articles have been published in CLINICAL PSYCHIATRY NEWS and in other publications about expectations for significant changes in the DSM-V Some of these discussions have focused on dissociative disorders. During my clinical experience...
Early Use of Morphine for Trauma May Offset PTSD
Soldiers who are given morphine soon after being injured were significantly less likely to later develop posttraumatic stress disorder than those who did not receive the drug as part of routine trauma care. This finding suggests that the use of...
Fink! Still at Large: Patients with Families Who Have Histories of Disease Face Unique Psychological Challenges. How Can Psychiatrists Help Patients Deal with Family Legacies of Disease?
Many people worry about getting the diseases of their parents or other family members, especially if those diseases are serious or deadly. It's natural to think about these things but not to worry or panic about them. Yet, that's what many people do....
Gaps Found in Depression Causes, Treatment
Two recently published papers highlight racial and ethnic disparities in the origin of depression and its treatment in adults and adolescents in the United States. In one study, Hector M. Gonzalez, Ph.D., of Wayne State University, Detroit, and...
Ginkgo's Ability to Boost Cognition Comes Up Short-Again
Ginkgo biloba shows no notable effect in reducing the incidence of dementia caused by Alzheimer's disease or dementia overall in older adults when compared with placebo, results of a recent study of more than 3,000 older adults show. The latest...
Going beyond 'Doing the Meds'
Dr. Richard Gottlieb has experienced the worst of times and the best of times in collaborative practice. Also known as the "split care model" or, less formally, "doing the meds," the approach encompasses a range of formal or informal arrangements...
Implant Short-Circuits Some Epileptic Seizures
BOSTON -- Patients with treatment-resistant epilepsy can significantly reduce their frequency of seizures with the use of an implantable device that detects preseizure electrical activity and preemptively aborts seizures. In 191 patients with medically...
Informed Consent: One Size Does Not Fit All
All of us who have been involved in clinical research at one time or another have had to deal with institutional review boards and informed consent. I am sure that most of you, just as I did, find the process demanding, challenging, and sometimes arbitrary....
IOM Calls for Continuing Education Institute
A public-private institution launched by the Department of Health and Human Services would be the best way to raise standards and quality for continuing health education, according to a report issued by the Institute of Medicine. Serious flaws exist...
IPS Model Integrates Intervention, Treatment
Mental illness and gainful employment should not be mutually exclusive. In fact, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 demands that they not be. The legislation and its subsequent amendments sought to eliminate unfair treatment of and discrimination...
Look for Alcohol Misuse in Vets with PTSD
ATLANTA -- Increased vigilance for alcohol and substance misuse might be warranted for people with posttraumatic stress disorder, according to a study of 379 recent U.S. veterans. Significantly higher hazardous or harmful drinking was reported among...
Major Genetic Risk Factor Is Discovered for Parkinson's
Mutations in the gene encoding the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase confer the single strongest risk for developing Parkinson's disease of any gene that has been discovered, according to a multicenter analysis of patients from around the world....
Marijuana Self-Medication Might Prompt Mood Disorders, Stress
SAN FRANCISCO -- The "medical" use of marijuana, which is common among patients diagnosed with illnesses such as HIV or cancer, might lead to depression or anxiety disorders. However, data suggesting that marijuana use is a risk factor for throat and...
Metabolic Testing with Antipsychotics Still Lags
Clinicians reduced prescriptions for one second-generation antipsychotic medication associated with metabolic problems after the Food and Drug Administration required warnings in 2003 about increased risk for diabetes and hyperlipidemia with that class...
Monitor HIV Patients for Anxiety, Depression
SAN FRANCISCO -- Substance abuse is such a common cause of anxiety or depression in HIV-infected patients that Dr. Robert B. Daroff Jr. advises getting a toxicology screen in every patient with HIV and a mood disorder. "It's one of the only objective...
Obesity, Diabetes Trends Portend AD Wave: Most Effective Method of Treating Cognitive Impairment Might Be Preventing Insulin Resistance
VIENNA -- If current trends in child and adolescent obesity continue, by 2040, one-third of the 81 million expected Alzheimer's cases worldwide may be a direct result of obesity-driven diabetes, according to researchers at the International Conference...
Panel Finds Poor Evidence for Autism Diets
There's no good evidence that children with autism have unique gastrointestinal disorders, nor is there convincing evidence that gluten-free or casein-free diets help these children, according to an expert panel. The panel, which was convened by...
Personality Disorders Raise Substance Abuse Risk
LOS ANGELES -- A nationwide study has begun to shed light on the complex relationship between personality disorders, and substance use onset and dependence. The odds of alcohol dependence, drug abuse/dependence, and nicotine dependence were elevated...
Perspective
Having a job is an important source of support and self-esteem for most people. It provides structure and offers a sense of purpose; it enables and encourages social connectedness and helps hone social skills; and the realization that one's contribution...
Providing Comfort after Suicide
More than 33,000 suicides occur in the United States each year, and 4.47 million people in this country have lost a family member or friend to suicide. Considering these compelling statistics, it is incumbent upon us as mental health professionals...
Psychiatric Diagnoses Higher in Wives of Deployed Soldiers
Wives of U.S. soldiers deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan for prolonged periods are at increased risk for receiving mental health diagnoses, compared with wives of nondeployed personnel. The higher risk was most apparent for depressive, anxiety, sleep,...
PTSD May Flag Suicidality Risk among Recent Veterans
ATLANTA--Assessment of suicidality might be warranted when treating recent combat veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder, according to a study. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depressive disorder (MDD), and a history of one or more...
Schizophrenia in Older Adults: There Is Hope
A confluence of demographic and clinical trends makes this a good time to reconsider the outcome of older adults with early-onset schizo phrenia. Over the next 2 decades, the doubling of the number of people with schizophrenia aged 55 years and...
Stimulant May Affect Adolescents' CV Systems
HONOLULU -- High-dose OROS methylphenidate was associated with small but statistically significant increases in systolic, blood pressure and heart rate in a 6-month, open-label study in adolescents. The study found that there were no significant...
Tamoxifen Shows Promise for Acute Mania
ISTANBUL, TURKEY -- Tamoxifen, long a workhorse for the treatment and prevention of breast cancer, continues to show promise as a novel antimanic agent. Findings from two separate, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials have shown tamoxifen...
Target 'Cellular-Level' Activity in Dependence
BETHESDA, MD. -- Chemical dependence as a result of drug abuse occurs at the cellular level because of neurochemical dysregulation, and an evidence-based understanding of these chemical dynamics and of the circumstances that drive a person to abuse...
Teen Cannabis Use Predicts Depression
LOS ANGELES -- Cannabis use in adolescence is associated with the subsequent development of depression--not the reverse, a large longitudinal study shows. Dr. Hon Ho and his associates from the department of psychiatry at the University of Colorado,...
Temperament, Polarity Point to Bipolar Type
Identifying the predominant polarity and affective temperament of inpatients with bipolar disorder could help to determine their diagnostic subtype and clinical course more precisely, the results of a prospective, cross-sectional study of Italian patients...
U.S. Releases Health Plan for Emergencies
The U.S. government has released its plan to deal with the health consequences associated with major national emergencies such as disease outbreaks, natural disasters, and terrorist attacks. The National Health Security Strategy, available at www.hhs.gov/disasters,...
Visions from outside the Box
Links between art and mental illness never cease to tease one's imagination, and psychiatrists hardly stand alone in their fascination with this theme. Sometime before the mid-century, the French surrealist painter and sculptor Jean Dubuffet began...
Watch for OCD in Children with Tourette
COLORADO SPRINGS -- Most children with Tourette syndrome don't need tic suppression medication, according to Dr. Samuel H. Zinner. "I tend to be a person who veers away from medications. I'm 1 of 15 physicians on the medical advisory board of the...