Clinical Psychiatry News

Clinical Psychiatry News is a monthly medical and psychiatry tabloid published since 1973 by the International Medical News Group. Subjects for Clinical Psychiatry News include psychology and psychiatry. The executive editor is Denise Fulton, and Gina Henderson is a senior editor.

Articles from Vol. 29, No. 10, October

ADHD Meds May Worsen Adult-Onset Psychoses
ASPEN, COLO. - Small subgroups children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder may well be experiencing long-term harm due to the stimulant medications that are standard therapy for this common condition, Dr. Randal Ross said at a psychiatry...
Adolescent Bipolar Disorder Charts a Troubled Course
PITTSBURGH -- The natural course of adolescent bipolar disorder is far from smooth. The rate of recurrence is high, and the impact on family relationships, economics, and other areas of psychosocial function is severe. As with adults, mixed and...
Alcohol-Induced Hallucinations: Prompt Care IS Key
BERLIN -- Hallucinations may be considerably more common in the alcohol-dependent population than is generally believed, according to a small series reported in a poster presentation at the Seventh World Congress of Biological Psychiatry. Although...
Be Alert for Postterrorism Trauma in Psychiatric Patients
Psychiatrists nationwide are assessing the impact on their patients of America's attack by terrorists, shaken all the while by their own horror at the devastation wrought when hijacked passenger jets screamed into the World Trade Center, the Pentagon,...
Bioterrorism Preparedness Assumes New Urgency
WASHINGTON - The threat of bioterrorism has become much more immediate in the wake of the devastating airliner attacks on New York and Washington. The Sept. 11 assault came just weeks after the Department of Health and Human Services had named a...
CBT Is Best Approach for Teen Substance Abuse
ASPEN, COLO. -- The short list of evidence-based treatments for adolescent substance abuse consists of psychosocial therapies only; there are no empirically supported pharmacotherapies, Dr. Paula Riggs stressed at a psychiatry conference sponsored...
Comorbidity Raises OCD Relapse Risk in Children
PHOENIX, ARIZ. -- Although comorbidity does not generally impair the therapeutic response to a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor in children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder, it does make relapse more likely after treatment is...
Correcting Insomniac Perceptions Cuts Anxiety
VANCOUVER, B.C. - Proving to insomniacs that they're getting more sleep than they think they are improves their perceptions and reduces their anxiety, reported Nicole K.Y. Tang at the World Congress of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies. Previous...
Counseling in Terror's Wake
The deliberate crashing of passenger jets into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, and the apparent thwarting by passengers of another such attack are events so startling, so dramatic, so unknown to anyone's previous experience that they have...
Daytime Naps, Not Depression, Implicated in Sleep Impairment
CHICAGO -- Short rapid-eye-movement latency and reduced slow-wave sleep in depression appear to result from daytime napping rather than from pathophysiologic processes specifically tied to depression, Dr. Daniel Kripke said at the joint annual meeting...
Docs Work Legal System, Recoup Denied Claims
WASHINGTON -- Physicians are getting bolder about challenging insurers over delayed or denied health care claims. Dr. John McMahan, an Illinois ear, nose, and throat physician, sued Employers Health Insurance Co., a subsidiary of Humana Inc., after...
Early-Onset Bipolar Disorder Looks like Severe Adult Form
PITTSBURGH -- Bipolar disorder in children and early adolescents resembles severe adult-onset disease, Dr. Barbara Geller said at an international conference on bipolar disorder sponsored by the Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic. It tends...
Enactments Can Open Door to Sexual Misconduct
NEW ORLEANS - Beware of enactments in the course of psychodynamic therapy, Dr. Eric Plakun warned at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis. While enactments aren't inherently bad, they can be one of the mechanisms through...
How One Doctor Can Help Prepare for a Disaster
Your community is not prepared for a medical response to a terrorist attack. Public health experts interviewed in the aftermath of terrorist bombings in New York and Washington advise civic-minded physicians to take three steps to improve local...
Lithium Displays Impressive Antisuicidal Effects
BERLIN - That lithium carbonate is the only treatment for affective disorders to achieve well-documented reductions in suicide risk should be taken seriously when initiating or discontinuing the drug-even for patients who do not meet standard mood...
Look beyond Classic Symptoms to Spot PTSD in Affected Kids
ASPEN, COLO. -- Manifestations of posttraumatic stress disorder in children are frequently quite different than from that experienced by adults, Dr. John A. Talbott reported at a psychiatry conference sponsored by the University of Colorado. Indeed,...
Mother with Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy Seeks Unneeded Mental Health Care
WASHINGTON - In Munchausen syndrome by proxy an affected child can present for unnecessary psychological treatment rather than for unnecessary medical treatment, Lisa Ware said at the annual meeting of the American Professional Society on the Abuse...
OCD Patients Show Serious Errors in Inductive Reasoning
VANCOUVER, B.C. -- Patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder show significant defects in inductive but not deductive reasoning, Marie-Claude Pelissier reported at the World Congress of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies. This finding lends support...
Opioids May Ease Effects of Compulsive Disorders
NEW YORK - Because the opioid system appears to play a role in a number of psychiatric disorders-especially those with compulsive and impulsive symptoms-opiate agonists and antagonists may prove useful in patient treatment, Dr. Eric Hollander said....
Paroxetine Eases PTSD despite Comorbidities
BERLIN -- Paroxetine appears to be an effective treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder whether or not the condition is accompanied by depression or other Axis I disorders, Dr. DanJ. Stein said at the Seventh World Congress of Biological Psychiatry....
Personality Disorders Tied to Single Lifestyle, City Living
Personality disorders are more prevalent among individuals living without a partner and among individuals living in the city center rather than on the outskirts of the city, according to Svenn Torgersen, Ph.D., of the Center of Research in Clinical...
Physicians Sue to Block HIPAA Privacy Rule
Mounting physician concern about compliance with a new federal privacy regulation has spawned lawsuits by medical professional groups seeking to halt implementation of the rule. The Association of American Physicians and Surgeons has filed a lawsuit...
Psychiatrists Call for Overhaul of Unwieldy DSM
Dr. Paul R. McHugh asserts that the DSM has become unwieldy and outmoded. (See CLINICAL PSYCHIATRY NEWS, August 2001, p. I.) The problem, he says, is that disease states in the DSM are classified largely according to clinical appearance rather than...
Psychiatry Plays Key Role in Relief Effort
When a terrorist attack destroyed New York's World Trade Center, psychiatrists mobilized to deal with widening circles of trauma. Augmenting the efforts of the American Red Cross and city agencies, psychiatric departments in hospitals across Manhattan...
Psychologists See Prescribing Rights as Inevitable
Nonphysician prescribing, drug industry pressure may influence debate's outcome. SAN FRANCISCO - Psychology remains a field divided in the quest for prescribing privileges. In multiple sessions at the annual meeting of the American Psychological...
Quetiapine, the Antipsychotic of Choice for Parkinson's Psychosis
PHILADELPHIA -- If psychosis in patients with Parkinson's disease does not respond to a reduction in anti-Parkinson medication, quetiapine should be the first antipsychotic tried, Dr. Stewart Factor said at the annual meeting of the American Academy...
Researchers Explore New Meds for Mood Disorders
SANTA FE -- Research is underway to identify new classes of drugs for treating mood disorders, Dr. Dennis Charney reported at a symposium on mood disorders sponsored by the University of Arizona. Although there have been refinements to the major...
Resilience May Be Best Defense for Children in Difficult Families
WHITEFISH, MONT. -- Children raised in dysfunctional families can thrive if they learn to be resilient, said Jerry Moe, children's program director at the Betty Ford Center in Rancho Mirage, Calif. This is best accomplished using programs based...
Risks of Recovered Memory Must Be Disclosed
Therapists who conduct recovered memory therapy have a duty to inform their patients that the results of this technique are uncertain and that it also carries the risk of implanting false memories, according to Dr. John Cannell, a forensic psychiatrist...
School Shootings, Although Rare, Are Still A Problem, Survey Says
Although at least 20 students in the average American high school are at high risk for shooting someone, there is a less than one in a million chance that there will be a shooting at a school, Edward Gaughan, Ph.D, told reporters at a briefing. ...
Sertraline, Venlafaxine Offer PMDD Patients Relief
BERLIN -- Although fluoxetine is the only antidepressant approved for the treatment of premenstrual dysphoric disorder, other antidepressants may also be efficacious, according to controlled trial data reported in poster presentations at the Seventh...
Sleep Deprivation May Trigger Insulin Resistance
PHILADELPHIA -- Chronic sleep deprivation was linked to insulin resistance in a preliminary study with 27 adult subjects. This association, which might be mediated by a stress response triggered by sleep deprivation, could play a role in the current...
Surgeon General's Report Spotlights Bias in Care
Cultural sensitivity in research and health care systems is sorely needed to improve access, quality, and delivery of mental health services to racial and ethnic minorities. In his new report, "Mental Health: Culture, Race, and Ethnicity," Surgeon...
Symptom Variety Complicates Asperger's Diagnosis
CAMBRIDGE, MASS. - Asperger's syndrome is difficult to diagnose because symptoms are quite variable, said Dr. Daniel Rosenn, a child and adolescent psychiatrist in private practice in Wellesley, Mass. Physicians may be hard-pressed to know when...
UCSF Creates 'Lesbian-Sensitive' Providers List
Concerns by lesbian employees at one university that they were having difficulty finding health care providers sensitive to lesbian health issues has led to the creation of a list of "lesbian-sensitive" providers. After the complaints arose during...
Use Caution When Combining Antipsychotics
Most everyone would agree that more isn't always better where antipsychotics are concerned and they should be combined only after repeated trials of single agents have failed. The drawbacks of antipsychotic polypharmacy are clear; the benefits are...
Women Often Defy Schizophrenia's Classic Course
ASPEN, COLO. - Schizophrenia in women often has a later onset and more benign course than is appreciated either within or outside psychiatry, Dr. Robert Freedman said at a psychiatry conference sponsored by the University of Colorado. Indeed, 15%...
WTC Attack Ushers in a New Breed of Terrorist
Intelligent, highly skilled, and delusional. The premeditation and calculated planning of the assaults on the World Trade Center and Pentagon suggest that a new type of terrorist has emerged-one who is intelligent, skilled, and committed, long term,...