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Clinical Psychiatry News

Clinical Psychiatry News is a monthly medical and psychiatry tabloid published since 1973 by the International Medical News Group. Subjects for Clinical Psychiatry News include psychology and psychiatry. The executive editor is Denise Fulton, and Gina Henderson is a senior editor.

Articles from Vol. 32, No. 3, March

A Harmful Obsession?
Once upon a time there was a children's world, as in Mark Twain's "Tom Sawyer," where kids were the bosses who could do what they wanted. Playing fields used to be part of this children's world. Today, many have become places where adults congregate...
Alopecia Nearly Epidemic among Black Women
WASHINGTON -- Alopecia has become almost epidemic among black women, the result of certain hairstyles that pull too tightly on the scalp and harsh chemical treatments that damage the hair shaft and follicles, Dr. Susan C. Taylor said at the annual...
Anorexia Patients Show Emphysema-Like Changes
CHICAGO -- Patients with anorexia nervosa have emphysema-like changes in the lungs that are similar to those seen in elderly smokers, Harvey O. Coxson, Ph.D., reported at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America. In anorexic...
A Ride on the Ferris Wheel
The story of Aileen Carol (Lee) Wuornos is a lurid tale. From her arraignment in Florida in 1990--for killing seven men over a 1-year span--to her trial in 1992, her case fed a national media frenzy. People ballyhooed her as America's first female...
Assessing Obesity Drugs
More than half of Americans are heavy enough to put their health at risk, and overweight is even more prevalent among persons with psychiatric disorders. While the link between psychopathology and obesity is complex--poor nutrition, inactivity,...
Attachment Disorders Can Be Spotted Early
NEW ORLEANS -- Attachment disturbances in very young children can be recognized as early as 7-9 months of age, and are predictive of troubled future relationships, Dr. Charles H. Zeanah Jr. said at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Pediatrics....
Avoid New Practice Pitfalls
Before accepting that first job in medicine or buying into a practice, young physicians should realize how important it is to do their research. Too often, a physician fresh out of residency will sign a contract without knowing the details about...
Behavioral Therapies Help Infidelity Couples: Findings in This Randomized, Controlled Trial Can Be Useful to Therapists Working with Couples Premaritally or in a Prevention Capacity
BOSTON -- Existing behavioral marital therapies are effective for couples dealing with infidelity, Donald Baucom, Ph.D., said at the annual meeting of the Association for Advancement of Behavior Therapy. These findings are based on the results of...
Body Piercing, Tattoo Prevalence Survey Underway
WASHINGTON -- A survey underway could provide the first prevalence data on body piercing in the United States, as well as an update on tattoo prevalence, Dr. Anne Laumann and Dr. Amy Farmer said during a joint presentation at the annual meeting of...
Botox Stops Headache Pain in Recalcitrant Cases
CHICAGO -- A new study, the largest to date, adds to the evidence that botulinum toxin type A alleviates and prevents headache pain. Botulinum toxin type A (Botox) is an effective preventive therapy for headache pain in a variety of patients with...
Bupropion and Schizophrenia
The Patient You have a patient who suffers from schizophrenia. Positive symptoms have been well controlled with an antipsychotic for several months. He requests alleviation of his nicotine habit. You consider bupropion, but, knowing the mechanism...
Careful Differential Diagnosis Is Crucial in Cluster Headache
CANCUN, MEXICO -- A careful differential diagnosis will help distinguish patients with cluster headache from those with other short-lasting headaches--a crucial step, because the treatments for these disorders differ greatly, Dr. Richard B. Lipton...
CBT Can Help At-Risk Nursing Home Residents
BOSTON -- Brief, group-based cognitive-behavioral therapy can reduce symptom severity in nursing home residents who are at risk for depression but who do not yet meet criteria for major depression, a randomized trial has shown. The results suggest...
CBT Less Effective in the Trenches Than the Lab
MIAMI -- A disparity exists between the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy for depressed youth in clinical trials and community settings. Most controlled trials assessing youth with depression support the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral...
Coalition Mounts Aggressive Campaign for Liability Reform
SAN ANTONIO -- A new and rapidly growing specialty society coalition called Doctors for Medical Liability Reform is poised to wrest the helm of the tort reform campaign from the American Medical Association. With $10 million in its coffers so far,...
Complementary Therapies Gaining Scientific Clout
SAN DIEGO -- Considerable evidence exists that alternative therapies such as relaxation training, acupuncture, massage, and even herbs have a place in modern medical practice, Dr. Brian Berman said at a meeting on alternative medicine sponsored by...
Controlling Chronic Pain-Part I
As psychiatrists, not unlike other specialists in medicine, we desperately want to help patients with chronic pain, but we often get as frustrated as they do in coping with this difficult syndrome. When a patient has been in pain for 2-3 weeks,...
Daily Sunscreen Use, Avoidance of Triggers Critical for Rosacea Control
WASHINGTON -- Daily, year-round use of sunscreen and avoidance of spicy or hot foods and alcohol are critical for controlling rosacea, Dr. Marianne N. O'Donoghue said at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology. "Sunburn is absolutely...
Daily Topiramate Effective for Migraine Prevention
BOSTON -- For migraine prophylaxis, 100 mg/day of topiramate significantly reduced migraine frequency compared with both 50 mg/day and placebo, and was as effective as 200 mg/day in a large cohort of patients with chronic migraine. Those findings...
Data Show Weather Changes Really May Affect Arthritis
BERLIN -- The old bit of folk wisdom that patients with arthritis can predict weather changes by the aches and pains in their joints may be legitimate after all. The perennial claim by patients was put to the test in a study of 147 people, whose...
Depression in FP Faculty Tied to Time, Program Concerns
ATLANTA -- Time constraints and concerns about unstable residency programs emerged as the leading contributors to depression among family medicine faculty in the first national study to examine the prevalence of depression in this population, Dr. Anthony...
Disruption of EEG Synchronization Also Seen in Manic Phase of Bipolar Disorder
CHICAGO -- Disturbances of EEG synchronization aren't specific to schizophrenia: They're also present during the manic phase of bipolar disorder, Brian O'Donnell, Ph.D., reported at the annual meeting of the Society for Psychophysiological Research....
Doctors as Politicians: Different Spin on Service
Former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean may be the best-known physician-politician in the United States, but he's far from the only one. From the halls of Congress to governor's mansions to state legislatures and local councils, doctors frequently scale...
DSM Criticized for Failure to Focus on Etiology
SAN DIEGO -- The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders should avoid simplistic diagnoses based on the politics of influential groups in favor of a system based on etiology, according to Dr. Eric Caine. In the DSM-II and -III, diagnoses...
Early Fitness Cuts Risk of Heart Disease Later
Regular activity to improve fitness over the long term probably has a bigger effect on metabolic-related cardiovascular risk factors than it does on cholesterol or blood pressure, according to a longitudinal study that followed its subjects for 15...
Easy Hypnosis Flags Dissociation Risk, Type
CHICAGO -- Hypnotizability is associated not only with both acute and chronic dissociation, it also appears to shape the type of disorder that develops, Lisa Butler, Ph.D., said at the annual conference of the International Society for the Study of...
Eletriptan Shown More Effective Than Sumatriptan for Treating Acute Migraines
CHICAGO -- Eletriptan, at both 40 mg and 80 mg dosages, provides superior relief of acute migraine than sumatriptan at 100 mg, according to a poster presentation at the annual meeting of the American Headache Society. Data were pooled from three...
Enthusiasm for Cancer Screening: Unhealthy?
A large majority of Americans desire to be screened for the early detection of cancer and seem to view it not as a choice, but as an obligation, according to a survey of 500 randomly selected U.S. residents. But such a commitment to screening is...
Ephedra Substitute Poses Similar Risks to Dieters
Rapidly proliferating "ephedra-free" weight loss supplements containing bitter orange are not a safe alternative to ephedrine-based products, experts say. A compound present in Citrus aurantium, synephrine, is chemically similar to ephedrine and...
Evidence Helps Clarify Alternative Med Options
LA JOLLA, CALIF. -- Vitamins, soy protein, chondroitin, and other dietary supplements once thought to be of dubious therapeutic value are playing a growing role in medical practice, thanks to evidence supporting their use, speakers said at a meeting...
Exercise Intervention May Help High-Risk Youth
FORT LAUDERDALE, FLA. -- More children and adolescents are obese than ever, but vigorous exercise could help them trim their fat and reduce their risk for chronic diseases, Bernard Gutin, Ph.D., said at the annual meeting of the North American Association...
FDA Panel Recommends Pairing Folic acid/OCs
GAITHERSBURG, MD. -- The Food and Drug Administration's Advisory Committee for Reproductive Health Drugs voted unanimously that an oral contraceptive pill is a reasonable delivery vehicle for folic acid supplementation. The 19-member panel debated...
Fever, Skin Disorders Top Worldwide Travel Illness List
PHILADELPHIA -- Fever and skin disorders were two of the most common symptoms of illness in returned travelers in a large, worldwide registry of travel-related illness. The GeoSentinel surveillance network, a collaboration of 27 travel and tropical...
Few Gay HIV-Positive Men Are Likely to Return to Their Jobs
Most HIV-positive gay men who are unemployed don't return to work, so physicians shouldn't recommend that those patients leave their jobs unless it is medically necessary, Judith G. Rabkin, Ph.D., of the New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York,...
First-Line Atypicals Have Similar Efficacy in Schizophrenia
HARRIMAN, N. Y. -- All atypical antipsychotics have a broader spectrum of efficacy in schizophrenia than conventional neuroleptics, but only clozapine is clearly superior for treatment-resistant patients, Dr. Rajiv Tandon said at a meeting on psychopharmacology...
Focus on Front-Office Issues to Improve Efficiency
LAS VEGAS -- A fresh approach to front-office issues ranging from time clocks to employee perks can help you run a more efficient practice, Dr. Scott Dine-hart said at the Fall Clinical Dermatology Conference. Dr. Dinehart offered some pearls he's...
For Comorbid PTSD, Drug TX May Surpass CBT
CHICAGO -- Depressed women with comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder saw significant improvement in their PTSD symptoms if they were treated with an antidepressant, but not if they received therapy instead of medication, reported Bonnie Green, Ph.D.,...
Future of Early Breast Ca Tx: Minimal Effective Therapy
SAN ANTONIO -- Treatment of early breast cancer is in the midst of a revolution characterized by a "less is more" philosophy, according to Dr. Umberto Veronesi. The traditional paradigm in early-stage breast cancer has been to attack it using maximal...
Gay Men at Increased Risk for Depression, Distress
Gay men are significantly more likely than adult U.S. men in general to be clinically depressed or distressed, reported Dr. Thomas C. Mills and his colleagues at the University of California, San Francisco. Based on an analysis of interviews with...
Green Tea Boosts Metabolism without Increasing Heart Rate
LONDON -- Green tea consumption may play a role in stemming the world-wide tide of obesity, Dr. Mary L. Hardy said at a symposium on alternative and complementary therapies sponsored by the universities of Exeter and Plymouth. One area of current...
Helping Patients Who Rage
One of our biggest challenges is finding ways to help patients who have problems with rage. What nonpharmacologic approaches have you used to help these patients gain control of their emotions? Children May Feel Helpless To help patients in psychotherapy,...
High-Alert Meds Tied to Errors
WASHINGTON -- Five "high-alert" medications--insulin, morphine, potassium chloride, heparin, and warfarin--were associated with the highest number of medical errors in 2002, according to the U.S. Pharmacopeia's latest MedMARx report. "High-alert"...
High DHA Intake Linked to Less Alzheimer's, Other Dementia
ORLANDO, FLA. -- People who ate an average of 180 mg or more a day of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a fatty acid found in fish oil, had about 40% less Alzheimer's disease and other dementia, compared with people who consumed less DHA. This level of...
Hype and Hope of Psoriasis Biologics Examined
NEW YORK -- Collectively hailed as the biggest breakthrough for psoriasis therapy in decades, infliximab, etanercept, alefacept, and the other "targeted biologics" seem poised to revolutionize how dermatologists treat moderate to severe psoriasis....
Hypertriglyceridemic Waist' Touted as Easy Measure of Metabolic Syndrome
NEW YORK -- The "hypertriglyceridemic waist" is a simple screening approach to identify individuals who are at increased risk for coronary heart disease, according to Jean-Pierre Despres, Ph.D. The hypertriglyceridemic waist phenotype--comprising...
Indomethacin Can Relieve Short-Lasting Headaches
CANCUN, MEXICO -- Indomethacin is the treatment of choice in a number of different types of short-lasting headache, Dr. Richard B. Lipton said at a symposium sponsored by the American Headache Society. Dr. Lipton of Albert Einstein College of Medicine,...
Integrative Medicine Is Gaining Popularity
SAN DIEGO -- Dr. Erminia Guarneri is an interventional cardiologist who, despite the apparent narrowness of her calling, decided a few years back that her patients needed more than balloons and stents. She persuaded the Scripps Clinic, San Diego, to...
Key Clues Differentiate Alzheimer's from Lewy Body Dementia
NEW YORK -- Specific changes in alertness and cognition provide a key diagnostic clue for clinicians faced with distinguishing Alzheimer's disease from dementia with Lewy bodies and the normal effects of aging, Tanis Ferman, Ph.D., reported at an American...
Let's Get Honest about Fibromyalgia
It's time for rheumatologists to recognize and act on the fact that what we have been doing so far to manage fibromyalgia patients has not worked well. We are not the best equipped to care for patients with this complex disorder. Fibromyalgia requires...
Levetiracetam Controls Epilepsy in Most Adults
BOSTON -- Monotherapy with levetiracetam for new-onset and hard-to-control epilepsy is effective and well tolerated in adult patients, including elderly patients, three retrospective studies have shown. One of the newest broad-spectrum antiepileptic...
Lifestyle Changes, SSRIs Favored for Hot Flashes
The first alternative to hormone therapy for treating hot flashes should be a lifestyle approach, such as instituting an exercise regimen or practicing controlled breathing techniques, according to a statement released in January by the North American...
Low-Fat Foods Helped Fuel Obesity Epidemic
CHICAGO -- It's time to end the national obsession with low-fat foods and develop a more evidence-based approach to dietary recommendations, according to Dr. Walter C. Willett. Toward that end, he is urging an overhaul of the Food Guide Pyramid...
Make Pain Resolution a Key Issue in Depression TX
NASHVILLE, TENN. -- Resolution of pain should be a goal in the pharmacotherapy of depression, especially in light of the current emphasis on treatment of the mood disorder to remission, Dr. Vladimir Maletic said at the annual meeting of the Southern...
Maternal Alcohol Counseling Boosts Development in Siblings
NEW ORLEANS -- A brief intervention designed to reduce drinking during a second pregnancy not only improved developmental outcomes for those infants, but for their older siblings as well, Janet R. Hankin, Ph.D., said in a poster presentation at the...
Medicare Enrollment Form to Be Simplified
WASHINGTON -- Medicare plans to revise its proposed enrollment form to make it more user friendly for physicians, Robert Loyal said at a meeting of the Medicare Practicing Physicians Advisory Council. "Some of the language in the form could be softened,"...
Methadone Death Spike Linked to Outpatient Prescriptions
Methadone prescriptions for outpatient pain management, not its use in opioid treatment programs, have been linked to an observed increase in deaths related to use of the drug in recent years, according to a federal government report. Given that...
Methamphetamine Withdrawal Changes the Brain; Brain Abnormalities Are Similar to Those Observed in Patients with Depression and Those with Anxiety
The brains of methamphetamine abusers who stop using the potent psychostimulant have abnormalities similar to those seen in people with depression and anxiety disorders, a study has shown. The findings suggest that adding therapy for those mood...
Mindfulness Training Boosts CBT in Social Phobia
BOSTON -- Mindfulness training was shown to enhance cognitive-behavioral task-concentration techniques used to treat social phobia, Susan M. Bogels, Ph.D., reported at the annual meeting of the Association for Advancement of Behavior Therapy. Dr....
Misfire in Brain Tied to Auditory Hallucinations
CHICAGO -- A miscommunication between the frontal and temporal lobes may account for auditory hallucinations in patients with schizophrenia, Judith M. Ford, Ph.D., said at the annual meeting of the Society for Psychophysiological Research. Communication...
Modest Exercise Maintains Weight in Mildly Obese
About 30 minutes of brisk walking each day can help maintain weight in over-weight and mildly, obese people who continue their normal eating pattern, reported Cris A. Slentz, Ph.D., and colleagues at Duke University, Durham, N.C. A total of 120...
Monotherapy May Be Best for Resistant Epilepsy
BOSTON -- Reduction of polypharmacy to monotherapy may reduce seizure frequency and improve quality of life in some patients with medically refractory epilepsy, according to results of a retrospective study. The 35 patients in the study had been...
More Studies on Bipolar Disorder Sorely Needed
CAMBRIDGE, MASS. -- Despite the presence of manic symptoms and evidence of mixed, rapid cycling, bipolar disorder was initially misdiagnosed in 12 out of 24 youths in a small outpatient study. A chart review of 24 bipolar children and adolescents...
Mortality Rate of Obesity Surgery May Be Higher Than Believed: Patient Survival 1 Year after Procedure Does Exceed That of Obese People Who Do Not Undergo Surgery
CHICAGO -- The chance of a patient dying as a result of bariatric surgery is actually about 1 in 50, not 1 in 200 or 1 in 500, as obese patients are often told, Dr. David R. Flum reported at the annual clinical congress of the American College of Surgeons....
Neuropathic Pain: Guidelines Simplify Management
Chronic neuropathic pain is common and debilitating, but new evidence-based guidelines promise to simplify the management of this type of pain by offering specific treatment recommendations. Chronic neuropathic pain--caused by lesions in the peripheral...
New Fragile X Often Misdiagnosed as Parkinson's
SACRAMENTO -- Men who are carriers of fragile X syndrome but not affected can develop a pseudo-Parkinson's disease when they reach their 50s, according to a published report from the University of California, Davis. Previously, it was thought that...
New Jersey to Open MD Records to the Public
New Jersey physicians have more to fear these days than toxic dump sites and bad jokes about exit signs. Recent court-ordered and legislative measures take aggressive actions to expose a physician's malpractice track record, a trend that medical organizations...
NIH Examines Conflict of Interest Policy
WASHINGTON -- A blue-ribbon panel will spend the next few months examining how the National Institutes of Health oversees the outside consulting activities of its scientists. Dr. Elias Zerhouni, the NIH director, formed the panel in January in response...
Opioid Dependence Likely Plays Role in Drug Co-Use Patterns
Sequential co-use of heroin and cocaine was more common than both heroin use alone and simultaneous use of the two drugs, and less common than cocaine use alone in a cohort of intravenous drug users in Montreal not receiving methadone treatment for...
Overall Teen Drug Use Falls for 2nd Year in Row: Inhalant Use in Grade 8 a 'Warning Sign.'
Overall drug use among 8th, 10th, and 12th graders dropped in 2003 for the second straight year, according to the most recent report on the Monitoring the Future survey. The annual report of the drug-use habits of nearly 50,000 adolescents in 392...
Pain and Alcohol Intake Not Linked in Older Male Drinkers
SAN DIEGO -- Pain and alcohol consumption were not associated in a study of older male war veterans receiving primary care. The finding is surprising because the link between pain and alcohol consumption among younger adults is well known, Dr. M....
Physicians Encouraged to Note Patients' Stress
SAN DIEGO -- Physicians are not paying enough attention to the psychosocial distress of their patients, and they would be more effective if they did, Dr. David S. Sobel said at a meeting on alternative medicine sponsored by the American Hospital Association....
Possible Predictor of Stimulant Abuse Identified
NEW ORLEANS -- The dopamine transporter genotype appears to be predictive of amphetamine response, Dr. David C. Lott reported at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry. The dopamine transporter is the primary site of...
Postmenopausal Mental Function Unchanged with Hormone Therapy
SAN ANTONIO -- Postmenopausal hormone therapy with either estrogen or progesterone alone or in combination has no effect on cognitive function, according to new research. "There's been a fair amount of suggestion that progesterone might negatively...
President's Proposed Cuts to Education, Research Draw Criticism
WASHINGTON -- The president's fiscal year 2005 budget request for the Department of Health and Human Services once again threatens to weaken key health professions' education programs and important clinical research, medical groups claim. The proposed...
Project Tests Ways to Change Health Behavior
The best way for physicians to counsel patients about losing weight and leading a healthy lifestyle may be to lead by example, said Dr. Wilson Pace, a professor of family medicine at the University of Colorado in Denver. At least that's what he...
Psychiatric Adverse Events Reported to FDA
BETHESDA, MD. -- Most of the pediatric adverse events in patients on paroxetine reported to the Food and Drug Administration during a recent 1-year period were psychiatric, Dr. Solomon Iyasu said at a meeting of the FDA's Psychopharmacology Drugs Advisory...
Republicans, Democrats Say Medicare Bill Needs Fixing
WASHINGTON -- The new Medicare reform law has some significant holes that need to be fixed, several experts and Congressional staff members said at a health policy conference sponsored by Academy Health and Health Affairs. Overall, the prescription...
Screen Teens for Use of Performance Enhancers
Anabolic steroids, ephedra, and creatine are top choices for teens who want to grow stronger or look better, said Dr. Reginald Washington, a pediatric cardiologist in Denver. More than 1 million 12- to 17-year-olds have taken potentially dangerous...
Self-Inflicted Skin Disorders: New Classification Proposed
WASHINGTON -- A proposed classification system for self-inflicted psychodermatoses that groups diagnoses by severity and course of the behavior may be more useful to primary care physicians than existing approaches in the dermatology literature, Anna...
Should Physicians Conduct Spiritual Histories of Their Patients?
YES There is growing research that religion makes a difference in physical and psychological health, prevention, and recovery. It also gives patients a more optimistic view of death and illness, and is a powerful source of meaning and purpose. But...
Social Phobia Eased by Cognitive-Behavioral TX
BOSTON -- Cognitive-behavioral therapy was shown superior to self-exposure instructions combined with fluoxetine or placebo for treating social phobia, Dr. David M. Clark said at the annual meeting of the Association for Advancement of Behavioral Therapy....
Some Cognitive Deficits May Signal Future Stroke Risk: Study of 1,011 Men and 1,164 Women Points to Importance of Intervention
NEW YORK -- Up to 10 years before they have a stroke, certain individuals show deficits in specific areas of cognitive performance that could suggest an elevated stroke risk, Merrill F. Elias, Ph.D.,reported at an American Medical Association briefing...
SSRI-Induced Hyponatremia Underrecognized
Hyponatremia is an underrecognized and potentially lethal complication in elderly patients treated with paroxetine and other selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, reported Tanya J. Fabian, Pharm.D., of the departments of pharmaceutical sciences...
Stress, Panic, Depression, Drugs Bring on Depersonalization Disorder
CHICAGO -- Patients with depersonalization disorder cited severe stress, panic, depression, and drug use as the most common triggers of symptoms, Dr. Daphne Sime-on of Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, told the annual conference of the International...
Study Explores Semantic Processing; Deficits Seen in Patients with Antisocial Disorder Differ from Those of Alcoholics
CHICAGO -- Subjects with antisocial personality disorder exhibit deficits in semantic processing that are different from those seen in alcoholics, although the two conditions frequently coexist. A study of 327 adults from the Collaborative Study...
Synthetic Peptides May Prevent Some Fas Injury: Small Amounts of These Compounds Might Avert Brain Damage Caused by Fetal Alcohol Syndrome
NEW ORLEANS -- In a mouse model of fetal alcohol syndrome, two synthetic peptides have been shown to prevent learning problems in young adults who were prenatally exposed to alcohol. The findings of this research are far from clinical application,...
Task Force Backs Obesity Counseling
A new recommendation from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force may help physicians help their patients tackle obesity. The task force now recommends that physicians screen their adult patients for obesity and offer intensive counseling, or refer...
Tell Patients in Trials of Research's Benefits
PITTSBURGH -- Patients willing to participate in clinical trials need to be informed about potential risks as well as potential benefits not only to themselves but to society as a whole, Dr. Matcheri Keshavan said in a panel discussion at a conference...
The Art of Aaron Holliday
The artwork of Aaron Holliday can range from the surreal to the startlingly realistic. His pencil drawings are lush and intricately detailed; and his oil paintings employ the same attention to detail combined with a riot of color and depth. By the...
TMAP Guidelines Gaining Ground
When Dr. Steven P. Shon, medical director of the Texas Department of Mental Health and Mental Retardation, attended a series of public hearings across his state about treatment of mental illness in 1995, he kept hearing frustration from patients and...
To Build Attachment and Foster Self-Regulation with Child, Heed Nonverbal Cues
SAN FRANCISCO -- Teach parents to be good "nonverbal detectives" to promote attachment with their child and to help the child "self-regulate" behavior. Marti Glenn, Ph.D., said at the 11th International Congress of the Association for Pre- and Perinatal...
Topiramate Shows Promise for Alcohol Dependence TX
NEW ORLEANS -- Topiramate appears to be an effective treatment for alcoholism. The anticonvulsant, approved in the United States for a wide range of epileptic disorders, was shown in a recent randomized, controlled study to significantly reduce...
Try 'I VOTE' in Psychocutaneous Disorders
WASHINGTON -- Patients with psychocutaneous disorders are miserable at the time they present to their dermatologist and deserve intervention to improve both their symptoms and the quality of life, Stephen R. Rapp, Ph.D., said at the annual meeting...
Unique Identifiers to Simplify Claims Processing
WASHINGTON -- A new, simplified system for identifying providers should make claims processing easier for physicians. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in January issued a final rule that announced its adoption of National Provider...
Vitamin C, E Combo May Lower Risk of Alzheimer's
Combined use of vitamin C and E supplements appears to help protect the brain from development of Alzheimer's disease, researchers report. "Our findings are promising," said lead investigator Peter P. Zandi, Ph.D., of Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore....
Women Crave Cocaine with a Different Brain Region Than Men
Findings from positron emission tomography suggest that crack cocaine cravings activate different parts of the brain in women than in men, reported Clinton D. Kilts, Ph.D., and his associates at Emory University, Atlanta. Those differences in cerebral...