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Clinical Psychiatry News

Clinical Psychiatry News is a monthly medical and psychiatry tabloid published since 1973 by the International Medical News Group. Subjects for Clinical Psychiatry News include psychology and psychiatry. The executive editor is Denise Fulton, and Gina Henderson is a senior editor.

Articles from Vol. 35, No. 8, August

A Case for Gender-Responsive Drug Treatment
Today, females represent 51% of the general population and a substantial portion of those in substance abuse treatment. Yet they are often not considered when it comes to designing treatment services. Many programs are still providing women with the...
ACE Inhibitors May Protect against Mental Decline
SEATTLE -- Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors that cross the blood-brain barrier slow mental decline by about 50% relative to the decline seen in patients on other antihypertensives, an observational study of 1,074 hypertensive subjects followed...
Adding Safinamide to Dopamine Agonists Eases Parkinson's
BOSTON -- The addition of safinamide to ongoing dopamine agonist monotherapy lessened motor and cognitive symptoms in a group of patients with Parkinson's disease, according to the results of a randomized, placebo-controlled, multinational Phase III...
Alcohol Appears to Be Neuroprotective in TBI
CHICAGO -- Alcohol may actually protect the cognitive health of some patients who sustain a head injury while intoxicated, Rael Lange, Ph.D., said at the annual meeting of the Research Society of Alcoholism. His conclusion stands in stark contrast...
Alzheimer's Is Poised for Exponential Increase
The prevalence of Alzheimer's disease is expected to quadruple over the next 40 years, affecting almost 107 million people--1 in 85--worldwide by 2050. This projected exponential increase points up even more sharply the need for advances in both...
A New Study Shows That Propranolol, a [Beta]-Adrenergic Blocker, Can Suppress Physiologic Responses to Traumatic Memories. Might There Be a Role for This Drug in Treating PTSD?
Clinical judgment is hard to define. As a psychodynamic therapist, rarely have I felt that suppressing memories is a good idea. After all, the basic premise of psychoanalysis is to uncover repressed memories and to deal with those ideas and feelings...
Awareness Needed on Opioid Prescribing Rules
NEW ORLEANS -- Get educated about state and federal regulations and policies on the prescription of controlled substances, advised David Joranson, director of the Pain and Policy Studies Group at the University of Wisconsin Paul P. Carbone Comprehensive...
Brain Changes Evident in Autism
STANFORD, CALIF. -- Increasing evidence suggests that children with autism have a normal head circumference at birth, but that many develop macroen-cephaly in childhood, Dr. Antonio Y. Hardan said at a recent pediatric update sponsored by Stanford...
British Parliament Expands Powers to Detain Mentally Ill for Treatment
British lawmakers have passed mental health legislation that would expand government authority to detain patients to ensure they comply with treatment. In the first revision to mental health law since 1983, the Parliament authorized the use of supervised...
Cannabis Use Linked to Increased Risk of Psychosis
Ever having used marijuana was associated with a 40% increase in the risk of psychotic outcomes, and the risk for those who use the most cannabis was more than twice that of never-users, according to a group of studies analyzed in a systematic review....
CATIE Results Show Overlap of Schizophrenia, Metabolic Disorder
SAN DIEGO -- The most important information to come out of the CATIE trial may not be the data on which antipsychotic to prescribe for schizophrenia, speakers said at the annual meeting of the American Psychiatric Association. The results of the...
CDC Urges Meningitis Vaccine for All Adolescents
ATLANTA -- The tetravalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine is now recommended for all 11- to 18-year-olds instead of select age groups, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. The...
Choosing to Tune out Dr. House
I have never watched Fox TV's "House." This is a choice I have made for myself. The show, of course, is a hit and its star, Hugh Laurie, has received praise for his acting skill. Laurie portrays a flawed doctor who is a genius and a gifted diagnostician....
CMS Projects 9.9% Cut in Medicare Payments
Physicians will face a nearly 10% cut in Medicare payments in 2008 if Congress does not act to reverse it in the next few months. Officials at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services published a proposed rule outlining the projected 9.9%...
Collaboration Needed to Help Anxious Children
ST. LOUIS -- In the 1946 movie "It's a Wonderful Life," a highly stressed George Bailey berates his sick daughter's teacher for sending the tyke home without her overcoat on when, in fact, the teacher was blameless. Bailey's erroneous assumption...
Combo TX Shows Advantages in Panic Disorder
SAN DIEGO -- A trial that combined a benzodiazepine with a second-generation antidepressant demonstrated no overall decrease in the time that it took patients with panic disorder to obtain a full anxiolytic response. But the study did suggest that...
Consider CBT in Cases of Secondary Insomnia
SCOTTSDALE, ARIZ. -- Cognitive-behavioral treatments can help people overcome chronic insomnia, even when a medical or psychiatric disorder appears to be the primary cause of sleeplessness, Edward J. Stepanski, Ph.D., said at a meeting on sleep medicine...
Cultural Factors Affect Use of Psychiatric Medications in Developing Countries
Multiple factors influence the use of new psychiatric drugs in the developing world, Dr. Siu-Wa Tang said at an international congress sponsored by the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry in Santiago, Chile. The cost of drugs is...
Depression Lowers Clinical Response to Arthritis Therapy
BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND -- Rheumatologists should screen or refer patients for depression assessment before prescribing anti-tumor necrosis factor-[alpha] therapy, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the British Society for Rheumatology....
Diagnosis Pattern Different for Bipolar Adults, Children
PITTSBURGH -- The pattern of psychiatric diagnoses preceding the diagnosis of bipolar disorder differs between adults and children, Pandurang M. Kulkarni, Ph.D., and associates reported in a poster at the Seventh International Conference on Bipolar...
Discrepancies Found in Pregnant Women's Reports about Drug Use
AUSTIN, TEX. -- A significant percentage of pregnant women are not accurately reporting their use of alcohol, cigarettes, or illegal drugs to their physicians, Dr. Mary Ellen Lynch said in a poster presented at the annual meeting of the Society for...
Does OSA Raise Gestational Diabetes Risk
SAN FRANCISCO -- Pregnant women who have obstructive sleep apnea have a 2.3-fold increased risk of gestational diabetes and a 4.2-fold increased risk of pregnancy-induced hypertension, compared with women without the sleep disorder, according to a...
Donepezil May Improve Some Autism Symptoms
STANFORD, CALIF. -- A preliminary analysis of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of donepezil suggests that the Alzheimer's drug may slightly improve some neuropsychologic functions in children with autism, Dr. Antonio Hardan said...
Drug TX for Borderline Personality Disorder
The Problem You have a patient who meets the criteria for borderline personality disorder. Despite engaging in dialectical behavior therapy, he continues to experience some paranoia, impulsivity, and reactivity to emotional stimulation. His self-injurious...
Early Detection of Schizophrenia Getting Results
SAN DIEGO -- Evidence has shown that the longer people with schizophrenia go without treatment the worse they do over the long term, even when they do eventually get treatment. Now, data from a very large public education project being conducted...
EMR Adoption Continues to Be the Exception
SEATTLE -- Only a quarter of physicians keep medical records electronically, and only 11% of hospitals have fully implemented them, according to Dr. Karen M. Bell, director of the federal government's Office of Health IT Adoption. In addition, of...
Ethnic Differences Seen in Drug Metabolism
SAN DIEGO -- Although racial minorities have tended to be overlooked in psychiatry research, it is now becoming clear that members of minority groups may metabolize drugs differently, and that may explain why they tend not to do as well with drug treatment,...
Expert Warns of Ominous Signs in AIDS Fight
LOS ANGELES -- The number of Americans diagnosed with AIDS is now approaching the 1 million mark, with more than a half-million deaths since the epidemic began and 17,000 more people dying of the disease each year, Dr. Harold Jaffe said during a plenary...
First Psychotic Episode Merits Special Approach
The first episode of schizophrenia represents a therapeutic opportunity. The disorder is usually as responsive as it will ever be, and effective treatment may limit the disability that characteristically worsens with repeated episodes. What happens...
Forensic Experts Urged to Monitor Own Bias against Mentally Ill
SANTA FE, N.M. -- Mental health experts who testify in insanity cases are not immune to a pervasive prejudice against the mentally ill in the justice system, Michael L. Perlin told forensic experts at the annual meeting of the American College of Forensic...
Gene Therapy Helps Parkinson's in Phase I Trial
Gene therapy for Parkinson's disease was safe and well tolerated by 11 patients, who also showed significant improvement in motor function at 1-year follow-up in an open-label phase I trial. The 11 patients were treated at New York-Presbyterian...
Guidelines Issued on Evaluating Kidney Donors
SAN FRANCISCO -- A panel of 70 transplant professionals has published a consensus document on the psychosocial evaluation of living unrelated kidney donors, Dr. Francis L. Delmonico reported at the American Transplant Congress. The guidelines are...
Heavy Alcohol Use Hastens Death by Up to 25 Years: Neuropsychiatric Patients at Great Risk
CHICAGO -- A history of heavy drinking cuts the life span by up to 25 years across all major chronic diseases, Hsiao-ye Yi, Ph.D., reported at the annual meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism. The effect seems particularly pronounced in...
Hydroxychloroquine for Arthritis Also Reduces Risk of Diabetes
Patients who take hydroxychloroquine for their rheumatoid arthritis symptoms also show a dose-dependent reduction in their risk for developing diabetes, results of a large study suggest. Diabetes risk decreased by as much as 77% in patients who...
Imaging Studies Detect Very Early Brain Changes in HIV
LOS ANGELES -- A combination of noninvasive neuroimaging studies were able to detect changes in oxidative stress, inflammation, and blood flow in the brains of patients with HIV before any changes could be identified through neuropsychological testing,...
Immigrants with Alzheimer's Face Big Hurdles
CHICAGO -- Patients with Alzheimer's disease face many challenges, including proper diagnosis, ongoing care, and burdened families. But older people who have immigrated to the United States from non-English speaking countries and may have Alzheimer's...
Incentives Yield Quality Gains in Medicare Demo
Preliminary results of a demonstration project that allows physician groups to share in savings they earn for the Medicare program has also resulted in quality gains, according to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The Medicare Physician...
Interventions Stop High-Risk College Drinking
CHICAGO -- Behavioral interventions can bring problem drinking to a halt, before it becomes an established pattern of college campus life, researchers said at the annual meeting of the Research Society for Alcoholism. Freshmen are especially susceptible...
Involuntary Commitment and Medical Patients
Involuntary civil commitment to a psychiatric unit or hospital is a well-established legal principle. But what should happen when a medical patient wants to leave the hospital against medical advice but might be harmed by doing so? Consultant psychiatrists...
Iron Accumulation in Gray Matter of MS Patients Is Quantified
CHICAGO -- With the use of a new method that provides objective and specific measurement of iron deposition in brain tissue in vivo, investigators have been able to quantify the increased iron accumulation in the deep gray matter of patients with multiple...
Link between Antipsychotics, Type 2 Diabetes Risk Unclear
BARCELONA -- It remains unclear whether psychiatric patients taking atypical antipsychotics develop diabetes more frequently than do other people, according to results of a systematic evidence review presented at an international congress on prediabetes...
Look for Depression, PTSD in Iraq War Vets with Migraines
BOSTON -- In soldiers returning from combat in Iraq, a self-reported history of migraine headaches was associated with at least twice the risk of symptoms of depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and anxiety as was seen in similar soldiers without...
Marketing on Hold for Medicare Advantage Plans
Several Medicare Advantage fee-for-service plan sponsors have agreed to voluntarily suspend marketing of their plans until officials at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services can verify that they are in compliance with certain management controls....
Migraine Patients May Benefit from Magnesium or CoQ10
RANCHO MIRAGE, CALIF. -- Alternative therapies are not a replacement for prescription drugs in migraine treatment, but they can reduce the severity of the attacks and help ease symptoms, reported Dr. Alexander Mauskop. In fact, "anyone suffering...
More Minority Participation in Research Sought
TORONTO -- Offering training to community-based physicians on how to conduct clinical trials is one of many steps the federal government can take to increase minority participation in research, according to recommendations unveiled by the Endocrine...
More Patients Seeking Medical Care outside U.S
WASHINGTON -- The emergence of medical centers in Asia, Latin America, and Eastern Europe that provide state-of-the-art procedures with a human touch and a gentle price tag has many U.S. citizens flying abroad to seek care they might have gotten at...
Most Interventions Ineffective for PTSD Prevention
HOLLYWOOD, CALIF. -- Administering individual debriefing, group debriefing, or pharmacologic interventions immediately after a traumatic event appears to offer little benefit in preventing posttraumatic stress disorder, Dr. Jonathan I. Bisson said...
Motivational Interviewing Helps Women Lose Weight
Motivational interviewing can help overweight and obese women with type 2 diabetes lose weight, though it is less effective in African American women than in white women, according to Delia Smith West, Ph.D., of the University of Arkansas in Little...
Myoclonus, Fever May Signal Serotonin Syndrome
NEW YORK -- A patient who presents with acute changes in behavior, myoclonus, hyperreflexia, fever, and sweating may be exhibiting symptoms of the serotonin syndrome, which is one of the highest-risk adverse drug reactions emergency physicians are...
Nearly Half of Diabetes Patients Are Not Reaching Hb[A.Sub.1c] Target
CHICAGO -- Despite significant gains in disease control over the last 6 years, nearly half of patients with diabetes failed to reach national treatment goals in 2006. An analysis of 22.7 million hemoglobin [A.sub.1c] tests performed on 4.8 million...
Neurologic Sequelae Tied to Gastric Bypass Surgery
A review of 26 patients presenting with disabling neurologic symptoms weeks to years after undergoing bariatric surgery illustrates the breadth of the potential neurologic sequelae and the lifelong risk of nutritional deficiencies in these patients....
Parkinson's Risk Increases with Greater Pesticide Exposure
Exposure to pesticides is associated with a significantly increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease and other degenerative parkinsonian syndromes, a large European multicenter study shows. Moreover, the risk of Parkinson's increased, depending...
Perspective
Ours is a greedy society. Where there is a profit to be made, there is no shortage of people scheming to make it--and there is a profit to be made in promoting gambling. So, it is not surprising that society not only does little to warn young people...
Physicians as Killers?
The failed car bomb attacks in London and Glasgow have startled many. One of the biggest surprises is that the alleged would-be terrorists are physicians or medical students--people who take an oath to save lives. But throughout human history, those...
Pilot Project Aims to Address Shortage in Child Psychiatry
Starting next summer, a plan aimed at increasing the child psychiatry workforce will be underway. That's when pediatricians who have completed residency programs approved by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) will be...
Placebo Response Likely Explains 'Poop-Out' of Antidepressants
SAN DIEGO -- If a patient with depression comes into the office and says that his antidepressant has stopped working, the drug you gave him probably was never working at all, Dr. Mark Zimmerman said at the annual meeting of the American Psychiatric...
Post-CABG Smoking Cessation Adds 3 Years to Life
NEW ORLEANS -- Patients who quit smoking within a year after undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery prolong their life expectancy by an average of 3 years, Dr. Don Poldermans said at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology....
Pregabalin Is First Drug Approved for Fibromyalgia
Pregabalin has become the first drug to win approval by the Food and Drug Administration for the management of fibromyalgia. The FDA based the approval on two double-blind, controlled trials of approximately 1,800 patients. Data from the studies...
Psych Disorders Affect Postbariatric Results
SAN DIEGO -- Patients with a lifetime history of mood and anxiety disorders lost less weight 6 months after bariatric surgery, compared with patients who did not have a history of such disorders, results from a single-center study demonstrated. ...
Psychotropics Benefit Moderate to Severe IBS
BOSTON -- Judicious use of antidepressants can ameliorate the psychiatric stressors that exacerbate moderate to severe irritable bowel syndrome symptoms, Dr. Douglas A. Drossman said at a meeting on neurogastroenterology and motility. These agents...
Rate of Alcohol Use Problems in U.S. at 30%
Thirty percent of Americans experience an alcohol use problem at some point in their lives. But to a large extent, physicians are not intervening--perhaps because they are not optimistic about making a difference, a report from one of the largest surveys...
Recurrent Abdominal Pain May Indicate Anxiety Disorder
BETHESDA, MD. -- Recurrent abdominal pain appears to be part of a larger syndrome of somatization and anxiety, Lynette Dufton reported at a meeting sponsored by the National Institutes of Health Pain Consortium. Physiologic factors may contribute...
Rivastigmine Patch Approved for Dementia
Atransdermal formulation of the cholinesterase inhibitor rivastigmine has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for treating mild to moderate dementia in people with Alzheimer's disease and in people with Parkinson's disease. Rivastigmine,...
Sentor Outlines Vision for Health Care Reform
WASHINGTON -- With the introduction of the Healthy Americans Act last January, Oregon Sen. Ron Wyden (D) became the first major political player to launch a proposal for significant health care reform since the early days of the Clinton administration....
SSRI Use in Pregnancy, Teratogenicity Assessed
Two large-scale studies of the possible teratogenic effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have concluded that the absolute risk of birth defects related to the drugs is small. Neither study could confirm previously reported associations...
Studies Show Physical Activity Delays Onset of Dementia
SEATTLE -- Evidence is beginning to suggest that exercise can at least forestall Alzheimer's disease, Dr. Eric B. Larson said at the annual scientific meeting of the American Geriatrics Society. "We now see association studies of physical activity...
Taking the Temperature on Global Warming
Even though summer in my neck of the woods can get fairly hot and humid, not too many people are thinking about global warming right now. We are just grateful to be far away from winter. In fact, this past winter was so long and cold that I was thinking...
Team Approach Is Used to Tackle Elder Abuse: Prosecutions for Elder Abuse and Neglect Are Up from 4 per Year to 70 per Year since Center Opened in 2003
In 2004, Dr. Solomon Liao made a house call he won't forget anytime soon. As one of three physicians who volunteer at the Santa Ana, Calif.-based Elder Abuse Forensic Center, he was asked to perform a medical evaluation of an elderly woman who was...
The Art of Nancy West
For painter Nancy West, finding creative ways to nurture art in children is a passion. For example, she would like to construct what she calls "public art puzzles," or large sculptures for young people. One of the programs she has developed uses...
Treating the Dependent Personality
Recently, I was running errands across town in Manhattan with Daniel, one of my adult sons. I had to use the cell phone and suggested that he drive. He jumped behind the wheel and asked, "How should I go?" After reminding him that he regularly travels...
Two ADHD Drugs Continue to Show Benefit in Trials
SAN DIEGO -- Lisdexamfetamine, the recently approved once-daily medication for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder that appears to have low abuse potential, was safe and effective when given for a full year, and guanfacine, an investigational...
Undiagnosed Anxiety Worsens Major Depression
ST. LOUIS -- Patients with major depressive disorders should be screened for comorbid anxiety disorders, including panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, social phobia, posttraumatic stress disorder, and general anxiety disorder, Dr. Naomi...
Youth Gambling: Beating the Odds
For teenagers, the warnings must seem endless. They are warned not to drink and drive, to say "no" to drugs, and to avoid unprotected sex. But they are not told to avoid using lottery scratch cards or to shun playing poker with their friends. Unlike...