Clinical Psychiatry News

Clinical Psychiatry News is a monthly medical and psychiatry tabloid published since 1973 by the International Medical News Group. Subjects for Clinical Psychiatry News include psychology and psychiatry. The executive editor is Denise Fulton, and Gina Henderson is a senior editor.

Articles from Vol. 35, No. 10, October

Adolescent Surveys Broaden Thinking about Bullying
SAN FRANCISCO -- Bullying that was experienced or witnessed by 185 high school students went beyond the more commonly acknowledged forms of bullying to include racial/ethnic harassment, sexual harassment, and homophobic epithets, Sandra Cortina, Ph.D.,...
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Alter Environment to Stem Stimulant Misuse on Campus
MIAMI -- Some general principles of substance abuse prevention are suitable for targeting college students who misuse stimulants to enhance performance, Dr. Theodore V Parran Jr. said at the annual conference of the American Society of Addiction Medicine....
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Antidepressant Warnings May Have Caused Drop in New Rx
New prescriptions for antidepressants in children and adolescents dropped by 33% in Tennessee after regulatory agencies issued warnings about increased risks for suicide, according to Dr. Benji T. Kurian and his associates at Vanderbilt University...
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A Survey Shows That Religious Physicians More Often Refer to Clergy Members Than to Psychiatrists. What Explains These Practices, and How Can They Be Changed?
Religion should be a private matter. Unfortunately for those physicians who are deeply religious, it is often difficult or impossible for them to separate their public physician role from their private belief system. We see this phenomenon in the case...
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Back to the Future: Tricyclic Overdoses Are Increasing
DALLAS -- Tricyclic antidepressant overdoses are making a comeback in parallel with the medications' increasing use for indications other than depression. In the pre-SSRI era, when tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) ruled antidepressant therapy, TCA...
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CBT's Role in Treatment of Schizophrenia Is Growing
SACRAMENTO -- Cognitive-behavioral therapy is playing an increasingly important role in schizophrenia treatment, Dr. Jesse H. Wright said at a meeting on psychotic disorders sponsored by the University of California, Davis. "The medications we currently...
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Cigarette Smoking Reduces Parkinson's Risk
A pooled analysis of 11 clinical studies has confirmed that cigarette smoking protects against Parkinson's disease in a dose-dependent manner. Many studies have suggested that smoking may play a protective role in PD, but most have been too small...
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Civilian TBI Data Show Dire Long-Term Outcomes
WASHINGTON -- Long-term data from a registry of civilians with traumatic brain injury may yield information that is relevant to the care of injured veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan, said Jean A. Langlois, Sc.D., at a meeting on traumatic...
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Combine Behavioral Therapies to Stop Marijuana Abuse
MIAMI -- A triple combination of behavioral therapies yields the best abstinence rates among heavy users of marijuana, Dr. Ahmed M. Elkashef said at the annual conference of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. This optimal combination of...
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Cultural Competence Is Not Optional
Increasingly, we are becoming aware of the prevalence of mental health problems around the globe. Depression--a major public health issue--has reached alarming proportions, and other mental illnesses are taking a toll on our patients in terms of morbidity...
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Depression Affects Heart Rate Variability
Depression severely impairs the recovery of heart rate variability after acute coronary syndrome, reported Dr. Alexander H. Glassman of Columbia University, New York, and his associates. In addition, heart rate variability (HRV) continues to decline...
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Do Physician Bloggers Compromise Patient Privacy?
Sophisticated bloggers can conceal patient identity. I write a doctor's blog, and I post in the open (www.talesfromthewomb.blogspot.com). I write fictionalized medical events, discuss studies relevant to neonatal outcomes, and, on occasion, muddy...
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Dr. Ellis Helped Change Our Field for the Better
Three years ago, at the age of 90, Albert Ellis, Ph.D., told a reporter that he planned to continue working and teaching as long as he could. "While I'm alive, I want to keep doing what I want to do," he said. "See people. Give workshops. Write, and...
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Dual Treatment Best in Co-Occurring Disorders: Optimal Approach Is for Addiction Psychiatrists to Focus on Treatment, Leave Monitoring to Primary Care
MIAMI -- In people with co-occurring substance use and mental health disorders, optimal treatment consists of brief screening and ongoing monitoring by primary care physicians, coupled with addiction psychiatry assessment and treatment, according to...
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Experts Dubious about Bipolar Study
Experts say the recent study reporting a huge increase in bipolar diagnoses in youths was not surprising, but it did leave some wishing that they had more information on how often those diagnoses might be correct. "We know that more and more kids...
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Federal Study to Look at ADHD Drugs, Possible Heart Risks
Officials at the Food and Drug Administration and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality are launching a largescale study aimed at determining whether the medications used to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder expose patients to...
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Few Migraineurs Use Emergency Department
CHICAGO -- Headache is the fifth most common emergency department complaint, but only a small percentage of migraineurs use emergency care for treatment, according to an analysis of the American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention study presented at...
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Global Mental Health Burden Underestimated
Mental health and other neuropsychiatric conditions create nearly 14% of the global burden of disease and frequently go untreated in many poor countries because of a lack of financial and human resources, according to authors of a Lancet series on...
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Healthful Living May Slow Alzheimer's Disease
CHICAGO -- A concerted effort to take better care of the brain with more healthful behaviors is likely to reduce the future incidence of Alzheimer's disease and may even slow disease progression in those who already have the disease, Dr. Nancy Emerson...
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How Much Training Is Best for Residents?
The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has reduced the amount of inpatient training necessary for psychiatry residents from a minimum of 9 months to a minimum of 6 months. At least two psychiatrists who supervise residents say...
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Insomnia in Elderly: Medicate with Care; Many Clinicians Prefer Nonbenzodiazepines over Benzodiazepines Because They Carry Less Risk of Falls
More than half of older adults have one or more chronic sleep complaints, according to data reported by the National Institute on Aging (Sleep 1995;18:425-32). The reasons are multiple: medical and psychiatric illnesses and the medications used...
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Migraine Often Improves over Long Term
CHICAGO -- Migraine appears to have a favorable long-term prognosis in many patients, with more than a third experiencing cessation of headache and the vast majority of persistent migraineurs reporting symptom improvement over 12 years. "These data...
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Military to Focus on Improving Mental Health Care: Services Aim to 'Create Culture of Support.'
ROCKVILLE, MD. -- The recent release of a Department of Defense task force report on the state of mental health care in the armed services may mark an important change in the way the military approaches the mental health of active and former service...
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More Adolescents Getting Drug TX
SAN FRANCISCO -- Adolescent admissions for substance abuse increased 61% between 1993 and 2003, from about 95,000 admissions to 153,000, Dr. H. Westley Clark said at the annual meeting of the American Psychological Association. Of those, 88% were treated...
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National Drug Use Survey Reveals Ups and Downs
WASHINGTON -- There's good and bad news from the 2006 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Overall drug use among adolescents has declined since 2002, but prescription drug misuse among young adults has skyrocketed. In the federally funded annual...
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New Cardiac Alert Added to Haloperidol Label
Awarning about the risks of sudden death, QT prolongation, and torsades de pointes in people treated with haloperidol--especially with off-label intravenous use--has been added to the drug's label, the Food and Drug Administration has announced. ...
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Number of Uninsured Americans Continues to Increase
The number of Americans without health insurance reached 47 million last year, up from 44.8 million in 2005, according to new data released by the U.S. Census Bureau. The percentage of individuals without health insurance also rose from 15.3% in...
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Obesity Rate Rises in More Than Half of States
Adult obesity is on the rise in 31 states, and no states have experienced a drop in obesity, according to a study from Trust for America's Health. Mississippi topped the list of the fattest states, with the highest adult obesity rates for the third...
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Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Borderline Personality Disorder
The Problem You have a patient with borderline personality disorder who is enrolled in dialectical behavior therapy and a regular exercise program. He is receiving treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, an antipsychotic, an antianxiolytic,...
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Online Game Playing Can Be Helpful, Hurtful
SAN FRANCISCO -- More patients than ever who seek mental health care are living at least part of their time in fantasy worlds--and they're not alone there. Millions of people around the world play online games that immerse them in a virtual world...
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Perspective
Many people think of violent kids as junior psychopaths who get gratification from committing violent acts. Instead, they should be seen as children whose behavior represents an absence of the prosocial family and community protective factors needed...
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PET Scans Show Depressed Dopamine Activity in ADHD
Adults with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder showed depressed dopamine activity in the caudate area of the brain on positron emission tomography, reported Dr. Nora D. Volkow of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, Bethesda, Md., and her associates....
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Physicians Deliver Street Medicine to the Homeless
Dr. Jim Withers is a familiar sight on the nighttime streets of Pittsburgh. That's because for the last 15 years he's been leaving the hospital behind to seek out unsheltered homeless people in need of medical attention. When he started in 1992,...
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Preteen Alcohol Use, Suicidal Behavior Linked
Adolescents who first drank alcohol before 13 years of age were significantly more likely to exhibit suicidal behavior than their peers who didn't drink alcohol, based on results from the 2005 Youth Risk Behavior Survey of 13,639 U.S. students in grades...
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Preventive Measures Could Save 100,000 Lives Each Year
Increasing the use of aspirin, influenza immunizations, and a few other preventive measures would save more than 100,000 lives annually in the United States, a new study shows. Aspirin proved to be the biggest lifesaver. Researchers found that an...
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Psychiatrists Encouraged to Stop Underprescribing Clozapine
SACRAMENTO -- The Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Interventional Effectiveness clearly showed the effectiveness of clozapine, but the drug is seldom prescribed by psychiatrists, Dr. Stephen R. Marder said at a meeting on psychotic disorders sponsored...
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Residency Duty-Hour Changes Tied to Mortality Reductions
TORONTO -- In the second year after the new Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education duty-hours rules became effective, mortality in patients hospitalized for four common medical conditions--acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, gastrointestinal...
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School-Based Violence Prevention Can Work
The spate of high-profile school shootings in recent years has brought youth violence to the forefront of the nation's consciousness. According to the results of a nationwide survey of high school students conducted by the Centers for Disease Control...
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Self-Referral Rule Marks Return to Earlier Policy
In issuing the third phase of the final regulations implementing the physician self-referral rule, also known as the Stark law, the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services has returned to a stance it held in the first phase. The Stark law governs...
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Statins May Slow Dementia in Alzheimer's Disease
Statin drugs may have a potential role in slowing the neurodegenerative processes involved in Alzheimer's disease, according to new evidence reported by Dr. Gail Li of the University of Washington, Seattle, and her colleagues. Dr. Samuel E. Gandy...
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Study Affirms Impact of Depression
Depression is more disabling than four other chronic conditions--angina, arthritis, asthma, and diabetes, researchers reported. And when depression is comorbid with any one of these chronic physical conditions, it impairs patients more than any...
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Study Elucidates Menopause-Related Sleep Issues
MINNEAPOLIS -- Women with no history of sleep disorders often report sleep problems--especially difficulty falling asleep--as they undergo menopause. Their complaints were validated by a sleep study of more than 700 women presented at the annual meeting...
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Suicide Rates Spike in Youth and Young Adults
Suicide among youth and young adults is again on the rise after a 13-year decline, according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. An analysis of annual data from the CDC's National Vital Statistic System (NVSS) identified...
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Suicides High among Rochester, N.Y., Home Care Seniors
NEW ORLEANS -- Rates of suicide are highest, proportionately, among the elderly, and seem to be very high among seniors who receive home care in the Rochester, N.Y., area, according to a poster presented at the annual meeting of the American Association...
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Technique May Reduce Auditory Hallucinations: Improvement Brought by Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Appears Short Lived
SACRAMENTO -- Transcranial magnetic stimulation has much promise for the treatment of auditory hallucinations, but the improvement that patients experience often is short lived and the techniques used need some improvement, Dr. Ralph E. Hoffman said...
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The Art of Debbie Kizer
Debbie Kizer likes to create art on small and unusual surfaces--like wooden ice cream spoons. She is in the process of painting one wooden spoon each day for the next year. "I enjoy painting on really tiny things," says Ms. Kizer, who is self-taught...
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To Drive or Not to Drive? That Is The
Do you routinely ask about a new patient's driving record--past and present? Is there anything on your intake form related to driving? Have you ever tried to get a driver's license removed from a patient? Are you familiar with the literature on mental...
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Worker Disability System Criticized as Destructive
CHICAGO -- The fundamental cause of most lost workdays and lost jobs attributed to medical conditions is not really medical necessity. Instead, it's uncoordinated, nonmedical decision making that distorts the stay-at-work/return-to-work process employed...
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