Clinical Psychiatry News

Clinical Psychiatry News is a monthly medical and psychiatry tabloid published since 1973 by the International Medical News Group. Subjects for Clinical Psychiatry News include psychology and psychiatry. The executive editor is Denise Fulton, and Gina Henderson is a senior editor.

Articles from Vol. 34, No. 6, June

ADHD Treatment Less Risky Than Nontreatment: The Risk for Substance Abuse in Untreated Patients Is 75%, Compared with 25% in Treated Patients
MIAMI BEACH -- The risks of not treating attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder are far greater than the risks involved in treating the disorder, Dr. David Goodman reported at the annual meeting of the American Society for Adolescent Psychiatry....
Amnesia, Stress Disorder Common after ICU Stays: A Metaanalysis Revealed That about 30% of Patients Have at Least Some Amnesia for Their ICU Experience
SAN FRANCISCO -- A surprisingly large number of patients suffer from amnesia or posttraumatic stress disorder following a stay in the intensive care unit, Dr. Craig Weinert said at the annual congress of the Society of Critical Care Medicine. A...
Antibiotic Prescribing Patterns Vary by Specialty: Penicillins Were Dispensed Most Frequently, Followed by Macrolides, Cephalosporins, and Fluoroquinolones
NICE, FRANCE -- Family practitioners prescribe penicillins most often, whereas surgeons prescribe fluoroquinolones more frequently than any other specialty. These are some of the findings from a 3-year study examining prescribing patterns of oral...
Ask about Pain in Initial Evaluations
Pain is a frequent concomitant of psychiatric disorders--depression, anxiety, and somatoform disorders in particular--and psychiatric difficulties are common among the estimated 86 million Americans who suffer from chronic pain. "In many cases,...
Be Culturally Sensitive in Screening
SANTA ANA PUEBLO, N.M. -- Different populations may require different screening instruments for depression, according to investigators who compared the accuracy of methods for detecting depression in 209 terminally ill cancer patients in Japan. ...
Bipolar Diagnosis Elusive in Elderly
SAN FRANCISCO -- A diagnosis of bipolar disorder can be missed in any patient, but this appears to be a particular problem in the elderly population, Dr. Josepha A. Cheong said at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Clinical Psychiatrists....
Community Health Centers Face Increased Understaffing
Community health centers are currently clinically understaffed and will likely face increasing shortages that may limit their expansion, according to a study by the rural health research centers of both the University of Washington, Seattle, and the...
Compulsive Hoarders Reveal Comorbidities: A Study of 75 Self-Reported Hoarders Showed Fewer Axis II Diagnoses Than Were Expected
MIAMI -- Compulsive hoarding occurs across disorders, according to a community-solicited study of people who reported hoarding behaviors and a wide range of comorbidities. Traditionally, researchers assess a group of people with obsessive-compulsive...
Depression and Diabetes
Depression is common in patients with diabetes and may require long-term treatment, a recent study shows. The study found that depressed, diabetic patients who responded to treatment with sertraline (Zoloft) were much less likely to have a relapse...
Disability Rate Declines among Older Americans
Americans age 65 and older are living longer with fewer disabling health problems, according to a report from the U.S. Census Bureau. The decline in disability is partly due to increased education levels among seniors, better treatments for cardiovascular...
Don't Misdiagnose Hydrocephalus as Dementia
GRAPEVINE, TEX. -- At least 6% of patients diagnosed with dementia are actually suffering from normal pressure hydrocephalus, which often can be treated, Dr. Mark S. Maxwell said at the annual meeting of the American College of Osteopathic Family Physicians....
Elevated Risk of MI Seen in Men Who Are Anxious: A 10-Year Study of 740 Initially Healthy Men Found That Anxiety Independently Predicted Chances of MI
MIAMI -- Anxiety in men may be a robust and independent predictor of the 10-year incidence of myocardial infarction, according to a study presented at the annual conference of the Anxiety Disorders Association of America. "This is kind of exciting...
Emergency Physicians Question Droperidol Black Box Warning
SOUTH LAKE TAHOE, CALIF. -- Emergency physicians should not let the black box warning on droperidol discourage their use of the drug in agitated patients, Dr. John R. Richards said at an emergency medicine conference sponsored by the University of...
Emotional Toll of Atopic Dermatitis Highlighted
KOLOA, HAWAII -- Atopic dermatitis exerts enormous and underappreciated adverse impacts upon personality development, psychological functioning, and family relationships, Dr. Sarah L. Chamlin said at the annual Hawaii dermatology seminar sponsored...
Episodic Nature Key to Dx of Seizures in Older Adults
SAN JUAN, P.R. -- Seizures in older adults have a different presentation than they do in younger patients, with these events resembling many other conditions and making diagnosis difficult, but there are a few keys that can help make the right diagnosis,...
Federal Plan Boosts Donor Organs for Transplant
MADRID -- A federal program has succeeded in boosting the number of donor organs available for transplantation in the United States. The next step is to also boost the rate at which available organs are actually transplanted into recipients. During...
Feeling the Burnout?
Dr. Darrell A. Campbell Jr. followed in his father's footsteps and became a surgeon. But the young Dr. Campbell is careful not to follow in his father's footsteps of letting his work consume him to the point of burnout. "I saw it firsthand when...
Four New Parkinson's Disease Guidelines Hailed: Review Finds Insufficient Evidence to Show That Alternative Therapies Benefit Parkinson's Patients
SAN DIEGO -- Use of alternative therapies in the management of Parkinson's disease is supported only by weak data, according to one of four new practice parameters issued by the American Academy of Neurology at its annual meeting. Considering that...
Hoarding Behavior Associated with Traumatic Life Events
MIAMI -- An association exists between traumatic life events and hoarding behaviors, according to a study of adults with obsessive-compulsive disorder presented at the annual conference of the Anxiety Disorders Association of America. "There appears...
Hospital May Spur Alcohol Counseling
SAN FRANCISCO -- Hospitalization may provide a unique opportunity to offer counseling to patients with alcohol problems. "As a result of an acute medical event, many patients have a high motivation to change their drinking behavior," Jennis Freyer,...
Initial Focus on OCD May Ease Defiant Disorder: Results Show Patients Must Be Open to Engaging in Exposure Therapy for Treatment to Be Effective
MIAMI -- Children with comorbid oppositional-defiant and obsessive-compulsive disorders may be more likely to engage in and benefit from cognitive-behavioral therapy if the oppositional defiant disorder is treated first, according to preliminary findings...
IOM: It's Time to Wake Up to Sleep Disorders
It's time for physicians and the public alike to wake up to the staggering impact of sleep disorders, a new report from the Institute of Medicine charges. An estimated 50-70 million Americans suffer from chronic sleep disorders such as insomnia,...
Liver Enzyme Seems to Influence Ability to Quit Smoking
BETHESDA, MD. -- Variations in the activity of the primary enzyme involved in nicotine metabolism may largely explain lower smoking levels and lung cancer rates found in slow metabolizers, Rachel F. Tyndale, Ph.D., said at the annual meeting of the...
Meth's Cognitive Effects May Short-Circuit Therapy
SAN DIEGO -- Methamphetamine abuse may injure the brain, according to new evidence and the experience of clinicians who treat recovering users. For some, the damage could be permanent. For many, there is an impairment that may be temporary but that...
Naltrexone Favored over Acamprosate in Alcoholism Trial: Therapy Did Not Improve Drug Treatment
SAN DIEGO -- A study that is perhaps the most important conducted on alcohol dependence treatment in recent years has found that use of the opiate antagonist naltrexone reduces drinking, but use of acamprosate does not. The COMBINE (Effect of Combined...
Neurologic Dysfunction, Cued by 'Soft Signs,' May Predate PTSD
People with posttraumatic stress disorder often show "soft signs" that signal subtle neurologic dysfunction, said Dr. Tamara V. Gurvits of the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Manchester, N.H., and her associates. The results of their twin study...
New Alcohol Test Appears Fallible: Several Medical Professionals Who Say They Did Not Touch a Drink Are Testing Positive; Losing Their Jobs
SAN DIEGO -- Nancy Clark, a registered nurse, had been drug free and sober for 3 years when she tested positive for alcohol on the new ethyl glucuronide test, the same one used for many chemically dependent physicians who are entered into monitoring...
Nonhormonal Therapies Show Limited Efficacy for Hot Flashes
Despite the avid interest in finding nonhormonal therapies for menopausal hot flashes, most of the alternative treatments have demonstrated only limited efficacy, and their safety remains in question, according to a systematic review of the literature....
One-Third of U.S. Girls Sexually Active by Age 15, CDC Says
BOSTON -- By age 15, more than a third of American girls say they are sexually active, according to a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention survey. About 26% have had oral sex, 26% have had vaginal intercourse, and another 8% have had oral sex...
Oral Appliances, Surgery Falling Short for Apnea
KEYSTONE, COLO. -- Oral appliances and surgery are widely perceived as effective alternatives to nasal continuous positive airway pressure for treatment of obstructive sleep apnea. But the evidence suggests otherwise, Dr. Robert Ballard asserted at...
Organizational Psychiatry: Does the Company Want to Change?
CHICAGO -- An important key to the success of an organizational psychiatry consultation lies within the consultant, Dr. C. Donald Williams said at the annual meeting of the Academy of Organizational and Occupational Psychiatry. "The consultant can...
Panel Cites Potential for Severe Rash; Stalls Modafinil for Children
GAITHERSBURG, MD. -- A Food and Drug Administration advisory committee said modafinil is not safe for treating ADHD in children and adolescents by a 12-1 vote, although committee members unanimously agreed the drug was effective for that indication....
Patient Adherence to CPAP Therapy Elusive despite New Methods
DENVER -- Continuous positive airway pressure is widely viewed as the treatment of choice for obstructive sleep apnea. When used correctly, it results in multiple benefits, including salutary changes in cognitive function, quality of life, blood pressure,...
Paxil Label to Warn of Suicide Risk
Paroxetine may increase the risk of suicidal behavior in adults, particularly in young adults, findings from a recent metaanalysis suggest. "It is therefore important that all patients, especially young adults and those who are improving, receive...
Perspective
It has been my experience that many, but not all, of the want-to-be jocks who use vitamins, power shakes, protein bodybuilding aids, and steroids in an effort to enhance their performance or appearance have low self-esteem and are insecure about with...
Physician Programs Inspiring Substance Abuse Treatment Efforts
SAN DIEGO -- Drug abuse treatment has a fairly dismal success rate among most groups, with one notable exception: physicians. Now, a group of experts wants to find out what it is about doctors or the assistance they receive that is so helpful so...
Play, Stress Management Combat Childhood PTSD
SAN FRANCISCO -- A behavioral medicine program of play combined with stress reduction and management techniques significantly reduced symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder in a group of children whose community had been decimated by two consecutive...
Postop Neurocognitive Dip Tied to High Inflammatory Markers
SAN DIEGO -- Increased levels of C-reactive protein and other markers of perioperative inflammatory response are associated with neurocognitive decline following cardiac surgery, Dr. Basel Ramlawi said at a congress sponsored by the Association for...
Preventive Measures Can Break Molestation Cycle
ATLANTA -- The general perception is that society is at the mercy of sexual abusers and molesters, with little recourse besides knowing where they live. But that view is not shared by experts and professionals in the field. Prevention probably...
Rape Associated with Increases in Headaches, Pain, GI Disorders
SAN FRANCISCO -- Rape appears to initiate a host of neuroinflammatory changes that could predispose the victim to later inflammatory disease, Maureen Groer, Ph.D., said at the annual meeting of the Society of Behavioral Medicine. "Victims of rape...
Skip Meds First in Treating Agitation
SAN FRANCISCO -- At least 80% of patients with dementia will experience agitation, Dr. Josepha A. Cheong said at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Clinical Psychiatrists. The temptation, especially at in-patient facilities, is to go immediately...
States Plan Med Schools to Bolster Workforce: With Physician Shortages Expected, New Schools Are Being Proposed in Florida and California
Several states are in the process of adding new medical schools to shore up expected shortfalls in the physician workforce. The United States could see physician shortages run as high as 85,000 physicians by 2020, according to government estimates....
Stroke History Raises Risk of Vascular Dementia
PORTO, PORTUGAL -- Stroke was associated with a nearly 20-fold increase in risk for vascular dementia in a univariate, retrospective, case-control analysis presented at the Fourth International Congress on Vascular Dementia. Among 205 people with...
Strong Link Seen between Depression, Inflammation
SAN JUAN, P.R. -- Growing evidence points to an association between inflammation and depression, according to a presentation at the annual meeting of the American College of Psychiatrists. For example, depressed patients have elevated inflammatory...
Studies Allay Fears of Iraq War Syndrome among Brits
British armed forces who were deployed to Iraq right before and during the 2003 invasion did not report significantly worse physical or mental health than British military personnel who served during the same period but who were not deployed to Iraq,...
Study Strongly Links Adenotonsillectomy with Improved ADHD
Half of all children undergoing adenotonsillectomy who were found to have attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder before the surgery no longer met the diagnostic criteria a year later, according to a prospective, controlled study. The study strengthens...
Suicide Experts Linking Mnemonic to Prevention
SEATTLE -- An American Association of Suicidology expert consensus panel has developed the first evidence-based list of warning signs for suicide--and fashioned a mnemonic designed to help get out the message. The mnemonic, which AAS officials hope...
Surprising Distress Level Seen in Asian Americans
MIAMI -- Asian Americans may experience distress after a traumatic event that manifests in psychiatric symptoms beyond posttraumatic stress disorder, according to a study presented at the annual conference of the Anxiety Disorders Association of America....
Survey Eyes Cycle of Sexual Abusers and Victims
ATLANTA -- Current data on sexually abusive adolescents who molest others are consistent with those of previous studies, which showed that they tend to have been molested before the age of 9 years, two researchers said at a meeting of the National...
Survey: Teens Use Inhalants More, Worry about Risks Less
Inhalant abuse, known as "sniffing" or "huffing," appears to be increasing among teens, and shifting attitudes about the practice are cause for alarm, according to the Partnership for a Drug-Free America. In a new survey of 7,200 7th-12th graders,...
Teens and Steroids: A Dangerous Mix
Any mention of teen drug abuse inevitably evokes images of troubled adolescents from dysfunctional families using cocaine, ecstasy, heroin--whatever they can get their hands by whatever means--to get high. The picture is accurate to some degree, but...
Testosterone Shows Mixed Results as Alzheimer's Treatment
Testosterone replacement therapy may improve overall quality of life in patients with Alzheimer's disease but cognitive effects appear to be minimal, judging from the findings of a small, preliminary study. "Testosterone-treated patients with [Alzheimer's...
The Allure of Amnesia
In the new documentary, "Unknown White Male," director Rupert Murray tells the story of Doug Bruce, a former stock broker turned photographer, living alone in New York City, who, one evening in July 2003, apparently experienced a dissociative fugue...
The Art of Martin Cohen
A few years ago, Martin Cohen was near a lumberyard and spotted something that would later become part of his body of work. "They had these amazing hollow doors," said Mr. Cohen, who is a prolific painter of abstract art. "They're great structures....
The Global Workforce Challenge
The fact that a physician shortage is occurring and is expected to worsen in the next decade has been acknowledged by the Council on Graduate Medical Education (COGME) and the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). By 2016, when the first...
The How-To of Relaxation Techniques
In many "Toolbox" columns, I have discussed assisting patients via the learning, philosophizing, and action technique I have developed over the last 25 years. The LPA technique is my integration of various kinds of cognitive-behavioral therapy into...
The Psychological Toll of Layoffs
In "The Disposable American: Layoffs and Their Consequences," author Louis Uchitelle says widespread layoffs among U.S. companies are taking a hidden psychological toll on Americans, resulting in what he calls an "anxious class." These workers suffer...
Trial Data Awaited on PFO Closure for Migraine Relief
SCOTTSDALE, ARIZ. -- Existing data suggest that a subset of migraine patients may benefit from closure of their patent foramen ovale, Dr. David W. Dodick said during a symposium sponsored by the American Headache Society. However, any clinical decision...
Value of Peer Support Regaining Attention: Studies Show Method Improves Symptoms and Social Functioning While Reducing Hospitalizations
An old idea--using peers to facilitate recovery--is gaining new attention from public mental health specialists as they search for ways to help the mentally ill get care in an overstretched system and return to productivity. Peer counseling is the...
Varenicline Gets Fast-Track Nod for Smoking Cessation
The newly approved drug varenicline may help a significantly higher percentage of patients quit smoking than bupropion, according to Food and Drug Administration officials and others. The drug was judged from early trials to show such promise that...
Veterans, PTSD, and Blood Pressure
Veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder feel angrier but show less cardiovascular reactivity when relating an angry memory than do those without the disorder. The seeming paradox hints that they may have reduced physiologic flexibility to strong...
Weighing New Evidence on SSRI Use
Until fairly recently, studies and reviews of global teratovigilance data have been relatively reassuring that SSRIs were particularly safe, especially with regard to their teratogenicity. In fact, there are more reproductive safety data available...
Writing Wrongs: Treating Graphomotor Problems
VANCOUVER, B.C. -- Graphomotor dysfunction--a disconnect between a child's thoughts and his or her ability to write them down--is becoming increasingly common in elementary school children, Dr. Melvin D. Levine said at a conference sponsored by the...