Clinical Psychiatry News

Clinical Psychiatry News is a monthly medical and psychiatry tabloid published since 1973 by the International Medical News Group. Subjects for Clinical Psychiatry News include psychology and psychiatry. The executive editor is Denise Fulton, and Gina Henderson is a senior editor.

Articles from Vol. 35, No. 1, January

Absence of Precedent May Limit Use of SPECT
CHICAGO -- Single-photon emission computed tomography may be considered useful in evaluating suspected sequelae from minor traumatic brain injury, but numerous issues must be considered before ordering a SPECT scan in the forensic setting, Dr. Timothy...
Adopting Person-Centered Care in Nursing Homes
Too often, nursing home residents with dementia are inappropriately medicated with antipsychotic drugs, several recent reports have shown. One large study of Medicare beneficiaries showed that more than one-quarter of nursing home residents nationally...
Autonomy Is Critical for Teens with ADHD: Make Adolescents Partners in Terms of Deciding Whether, or When, They Will Take Their Medications
ATLANTA -- Adolescents with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder need to be listened to by their physicians and given a sense of being in control of their lives and their therapy, Dr. Howard Schubiner said at the annual meeting of the American...
Behavioral Therapies Address Factors Underlying Migraine
SCOTTSDALE, ARIZ. -- Misconceptions and other barriers to behavioral therapy limit headache patients' access to potentially beneficial nonpharmacologic treatments, Donald B. Penzien, Ph.D., said at a symposium sponsored by the American Headache Society....
Can the Treatment of Depression Prevent Deaths from Heart Disease?
Without firm evidence that treating depression can improve survival in cardiac patients, Dr. Nancy Frasure-Smith, a CREATE investigator, described the current status of depression as a cardiac risk factor as "very reminiscent of the pre-statin status...
Caring for the Involuntarily Hospitalized Patient: What Is the Best Way to Approach the Delivery of Psychiatric Services to Acutely Ill Patients Who Are under Involuntary Commitment?
Our readers share their approaches: Richard G. Pugliese, M.D., of Middletown, Conn., emphasizes the importance of frank exchange of information with his patient to avoid the need for a hearing. My experiences with involuntary commitment have...
Childhood Apnea May Exact Cognitive Loss
MONTREAL -- Pediatric obstructive sleep apnea may have lifelong physiologic and cognitive consequences even after it is successfully treated, according to Dr. David Gozal, professor of pediatrics at the University of Louisville (Ky.). "Children...
Citalopram Bests Placebo in Depressed CAD Patients
TUCSON, ARIZ. -- A randomized, multicenter Canadian trial testing interpersonal psychotherapy and citalopram in 284 depressed patients with stable coronary artery disease produced mixed results, investigators reported at the annual meeting of the Academy...
Comorbidities Affect Preschoolers' Response to ADHD Therapy
SAN DIEGO -- Preschool children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder who had three or more co-morbid disorders responded less favorably to 5 weeks of methylphenidate treatment, compared with children who had fewer comorbid disorders, according...
Congress Delays Physician Pay Cuts in Last-Minute Fix: Medicare Fees Could Drop 5%-10% in 2008
In one of its last actions, the 109th Congress approved a sweeping tax and health bill that included a 1-year delay in the scheduled cut in physician fees under the federal Medicare program. In 2007, physicians were due to see a 5% reduction in...
Depression Screening Program Saves Money for Employers
For employers, the savings generated by a low-intensity depression screening and management program for workers more than offset the costs, according to Dr. Philip S. Wang of Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, and his associates. The researchers...
Develop Strategy to Halt Overuse of Pain Meds
SCOTTSDALE, ARIZ. -- Withdrawing patients from overused headache medications is long, hard work for them, but it can be accomplished with strong physician support, Dr. Todd D. Rozen told clinicians at a symposium sponsored by the American Headache...
Facial Photo Capture Could Prevent Errors
WASHINGTON -- Electronic bar codes and radiofrequency microchips are all the rage in medical error prevention, but one research team thinks avoiding mistakes may be as easy as snapping a photo. Researchers with the MedStar Health network here are...
FDA Approves Extended-Release Drug for Schizophrenia
NEW YORK -- A new agent for the treatment of schizophrenia, paliperidone extended release, effectively controlled symptoms and improved function among severely ill patients in a post-hoc analysis of data from three double-blind studies. Paliperidone,...
FDA Issues Advisory on Methadone
Reports of deaths, cardiac arrhythmias, respiratory depression, and other serious adverse events in people treated with methadone for pain prompted the Food and Drug Administration to issue a public health advisory and revise its prescribing information...
Genetic Testing Spots Risk for Antipsychotic Adverse Events
NEW YORK--Pharmacogeetic testing for deficiencies in he cytochrome P450-2D6 enyme may be useful in predicting which patients are at increased risk for the development of adverse events during treatment with aripiprazole, according to Dr. Anton A. Subuh...
Group Wants Medicare to Help Reduce Disparities
WASHINGTON -- As one of the biggest and most influential payers in medicine, Medicare should use its clout to help reduce and eliminate the disparities in care for racial and ethnic minorities, according to a report from an independent panel of the...
Harm Reduction Proves Popular with Crack Users
TORONTO -- Harm-reduction programs that use clean needle exchanges and other measures to limit the spread of HIV infection among injection heroin users also can educate crack users about safer crack-smoking materials, according to a Canadian public...
HBOT May Lead to Improved Cognition in Cerebral Palsy
FORT LAUDERDALE, FLA. -- Adjunctive hyperbaric oxygen therapy significantly improves cognition for children with cerebral palsy, compared with standard therapy alone, according to an open, ongoing, observational study. All participants significantly...
Health Concerns Common in Anxiety Disorders
CHICAGO -- Health anxiety is a prominent feature of all types of anxiety disorders, Jonathan S. Abramowitz, Ph.D., reported at the annual meeting of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies. "Health concerns are present across the...
Hyperbaric Oxygen Benefits Children with Brain Injury
FORT LAUDERDALE, FLA. -- Hyperbaric oxygen therapy improves cognitive and social function in children with chronic brain injury, according to a study presented at a symposium on hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Daily living, socialization, communication,...
Medical Schools Just Say No to Drug Reps' Gifts
SACRAMENTO -- Another medical school has joined what could be a growing movement to ban faculty and residents from accepting gifts from drug company representatives. The University of California, Davis, Health System decided in late November to...
Methadone Used for Pain Linked to Sleep Apnea: The Sleep-Disordered Breathing Seen in Baby Boomers Being Treated for Chronic Pain Is Severe
Dr. Amanda A. Beck and her colleagues were puzzled by some of their patients at the University of New Mexico's Sleep Disorders Center in Albuquerque. The patients took methadone, but they did not have histories of drug abuse. They were middle-class...
My New Year's Ethical Resolutions
Editors' Note: Ethical issues are paramount in all medical specialties, but they seem to take on added significance in psychiatry. That's why CLINICAL PSYCHIATRY NEWS is starting a new monthly column, The Ethical Way, which will be written by Dr. H....
Narcissism Affects Many Impaired Physicians
MENDOZA, ARGENTINA -- Physicians with addictions to alcohol, drugs, or gambling--or those charged with sexual misconduct--generally do well in overcoming their problems with good treatment, Dr. Gregory Collins reported at the Sixth World Congress on...
New JCAHO Safety Goal: Identify Suicide Risks
TUCSON, ARIZ. -- As of this month, the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations has made the identification of patients who are at risk for suicide one of its patient safety goals for behavioral health care. Yet little is known...
Ob-la-Di, Ob-la-Da, Life Goes On
"The Up Series" is a British television project that has tracked 14 individuals across the lifespan since 1963, when they were 7 years old. Michael Apted helped select subjects and did research for the first film, "Seven Up!" (1964). There was no plan...
Opinions Vary Widely on Financial Disclosures
Officials in charge of disclosing financial interests in research agree that disclosure is important, but are confused about how to do so effectively and appropriately, Kevin P. Weinfurt, Ph.D., and his colleagues reported. Their survey of 42 such...
Palliative Care to Be Recognized as Subspecialty: Physicians in Psychiatry and Other Specialties May Be Able to Take Certification Examination by 2008
The field of palliative care took a major step forward last year, when members of the American Board of Medical Specialties voted to approve hospice and palliative medicine as a recognized subspecialty. The application to recognize the subspecialty...
Panel Backs Expanding Label on Antidepressants
SILVER SPRING, MD. -- Psychiatrists remain concerned about any additions to the black box warning on antidepressants but hail recommendations made by a Food and Drug Administration advisory panel calling for labeling highlighting the risks and benefits...
Perfectionism Predicts Eating Disorder Risk
CHICAGO -- Self-oriented and socially prescribed perfectionism in female college students who also have body dissatisfaction are important factors putting these women at risk for eating disorders, Christina A. Downey said at the annual meeting of the...
Perspective
In the old days, "neuroleptic" medication was prescribed not only for psychosis, but also for other conditions that required a major tranquilizer, such as delirium and other behavioral disturbances, including affective disorders. Today, we certainly...
Pharmacists Have Misconceptions about Chronic Pain Management
ORLANDO -- Pharmacists who dispense in the community tend to be skeptical about patients who require chronic medication with controlled substances, according to a survey of pharmacists practicing in both urban and rural areas of Alabama. The survey...
Pramipexole Approved for Restless Legs Syndrome: Dopamine Agonists Were Already Considered First-Line Treatment
While misdiagnosis of restless legs syndrome remains common, the Food and Drug Administration has increased the agents available to treat this movement disorder by approving the dopamine agonist pramipexole for moderate to severe cases. Pramipexole...
Prevention Is the Future
Editors' Note: In our continuing effort to serve readers by discussing ideas that will help move the specialty forward, the Editorial Advisory Board members of CLINICAL PSYCHIATRY NEWS will offer their perspectives over the next year on what might...
Primary Care Role Key in Postwar Mental Illness
TUCSON, ARIZ. -- Primary care physicians have a key role to play in screening soldiers and veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars for posttraumatic stress disorder and depression, Col. Charles C. Engel, MC, USA, said at the annual meeting of the...
Protocol Targets Frontal Cortex
NEW YORK -- Researchers at Columbia University and the New York State Psychiatric Institute are using the tools of neuroimaging to modernize electro-convulsive therapy for severe depression and other psychiatric disorders. By applying principles...
Psychiatric Disorders Common in Royal Australian Navy
HOLLYWOOD, CALIF. -- A large study of military recruits has determined that almost half developed a psychiatric disorder after joining military service. In addition, the study suggests that if the serviceman receives mental health and social support...
Rage Linked to Arrhythmias and Shocks from Defibrillators
CHICAGO -- Episodes of extreme anger were linked to ventricular arrhythmias and shocks from implantable cardioverter defibrillators in a study with more than 1,000 patients. Although the findings do not prove that severe anger triggers arrhythmias,...
Schizophrenia, Substance Use Need Integrated Tx: Take into Account the Possible Synergistic Effects between Antipsychotics and Drugs of Abuse
People with schizophrenia are highly likely to have a substance use disorder as well: The lifetime prevalence of nearly 50% is three times the rate in the general population (J. Clin. Psychiatry 2006;67[suppl. 7]:31-5). "It tends to be more abuse...
Sleep Maintenance Problems Predominate in Elderly Insomniacs
PARIS -- Pooled data from two clinical trials of eszopiclone suggest that elderly insomniacs have more difficulty staying asleep than falling asleep, Judy Caron, Ph.D., reported at the annual congress of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology....
State Laws Deficient in Dealing with Predators
CHICAGO -- The confinement of sex offenders using general commitment statutes is eroding the distinction between those who need treatment for mental illness and those needing treatment for sex-offending risk, Dr. Roger M. Harris reported at the annual...
Suboxone for Opiate Withdrawal in the Hospital
Suboxone, a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone, originally was developed for outpatient psychiatric practice. However, the hospital setting just might be ideal for treating inpatients who have opiate addiction with Suboxone. This month, Dr....
Substance Use by Female Sex Offenders: A Peek at Reality
CHICAGO -- Female sex offenders should be evaluated for substance abuse no less rigorously than are male sex offenders, Dr. R. Gregg Dwyer said at a poster session of the annual meeting of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law. "Our search...
Survey Addresses Location, Practice Patterns of Pain Specialists
SAN ANTONIO -- Lack of nearby pain practices helps explain why only about 5% of U.S. adults with chronic pain ever see a pain specialist, Brenda Breuer, Ph.D., said at the annual meeting of the American Pain Society. The finding comes from a survey...
Teens' Illicit Drug Use Down, 2006 Data Show
More U.S. teens are saying no to illicit drugs, cigarettes, and alcohol, but they are abusing prescription drugs at about the same rate they did last year, the 2006 Monitoring the Future Survey shows. The annual assessment of adolescent substance...
The Art of Anthony Ballard
Long before computer graphics became the norm, many designers, illustrators, and draftsmen used Rapidograph pens to draw solid, flowing lines of specified widths. Rapidograph pens are extremely versatile, demand very little hand pressure, and work...
Unipolar Depression May Require Different Tack
MENDOZA, ARGENTINA -- The use of antidepressants may not be effective for long-term treatment of unipolar depression, and may actually be harmful, Dr. Ulrik Malt reported at the 6th World Congress of Depressive Disorders. "There are no good arguments...
Universal HIV Screening May Overload System: One Expert Says That the Current CDC Budget for HIV Prevention Is Already Short by $350 Million
WASHINGTON -- New recommendations to test routinely for HIV in all patients aged 13-64 years would overburden the U.S. health care system with newly diagnosed patients unless additional funding is provided, experts said at a press briefing by the Centers...
Violent Video Games Alter Brain Functioning in Imaging Study
CHICAGO -- Adolescents who play violent video games demonstrate distinct alterations in brain activation on functional magnetic resonance imaging, investigators have shown for the first time. In a study of 44 healthy adolescents, the teenagers who...
Who's Treating Depression?
Depression screening is becoming a mainstay in general medical evaluations, and this is a positive development, considering its prevalence and power. Depression is one of the four leading causes of disabilities and disease throughout the world, and...
Women in Jail Receptive to Substance Abuse Treatment
CHICAGO -- Incarcerated women with substance abuse or dependence disorders are highly receptive to treatment while in jail, according to a poster study presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law. "We were a...
Youngest Recruits Have More Psych Evacuations: Those with Service in Iraq, Afghanistan 'With Not Much Time in Theater' May Need Special Attention
TUCSON, ARIZ. -- A records review of 1,264 consecutive psychiatric evacuees from Iraq and Afghanistan found the youngest members of the armed forces to be at greatest risk of removal for psychiatric causes. Female, Hispanic, and African American...