Clinical Psychiatry News

Clinical Psychiatry News is a monthly medical and psychiatry tabloid published since 1973 by the International Medical News Group. Subjects for Clinical Psychiatry News include psychology and psychiatry. The executive editor is Denise Fulton, and Gina Henderson is a senior editor.

Articles from Vol. 36, No. 12, December

Children in Need Less Likely to Get Samples
Free drug samples not only do little to equalize medication access in the pediatric population, but they also may pose safety concerns in young patients, results of a recent study show. The practice of providing free drug samples to children in...
Conflict-of-Interest Issues Are Stirring Up Psychiatry
The debate about conflict of interest in psychiatry is being pushed out into the open, driven by the seemingly relentless pursuit of Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa), coverage in major national newspapers, and the overall move in medicine to address...
Consider Behavioral Therapies First for ASD
BALTIMORE -- Medication is not a surefire solution for the symptoms associated with autism spectrum disorders, according to Dr. Kenneth E. Towbin. "Many people seek medication for children with autism spectrum disorders, imagining that there is...
DBS Effective in Early-Onset Form of Dystonia
CHICAGO -- The efficacy of deep brain stimulation can be maintained for up to 10 years in DYT1 dystonia, according to data from a study in 26 consecutive patients. This prospective study is the first to report on more than 3 years of follow-up...
Exercise Improves Outcomes in Heart Failure
NEW ORLEANS -- In the largest study of exercise training as part of the management of heart failure to date, a guided exercise program was safe and modestly effective, although investigators acknowledged that patients found it hard to keep up the...
Federal Panel Recognizes Gulf War Syndrome
It's been a long time coming for veterans whose health complaints have been met with skepticism, but a federal committee has determined that Gulf War syndrome is not only real, it is tied to two causes: exposure to pyridostigmine bromide and certain...
Fink! Still at Large: A Study Shows Increased Activity in the Brains of Aggressive Boys Who Watched a Video Clip of One Person Inflicting Pain on Another. Are These Findings Surprising?
I am stunned by these results. Until now, I had thought that behavior was developmental and learned. The study, conducted by researchers at the University of Chicago, showed that there is a genuine biologic component to the aggression in adolescents...
Guideline Issued on Newer Antidepressants
Second-generation antidepressants are similarly effective in the treatment of major depression in adults, thus drug selection should be driven by adverse event profile, cost, and patient preference, according to a clinical practice guideline issued...
Health Reform '09: Major Overhaul-Or Not
WASHINGTON -- Can President-elect Barack Obama really shepherd through major health reform? Not until the Medicare physician payment system gets fixed, according to Robert Laszewski. "How do you plan a health care budget in Medicare and the private...
Hospitalists Urged to Act as 'Agents of Change'
VANCOUVER, B.C. -- Hospitalists are ideally qualified and positioned to drive hospital quality improvement initiatives, Dr. Larry Wellikson said at the annual Canadian Hospitalist Conference. "We are owners, not renters," he said, contrasting...
How about a Bailout for Our Patients?
As I write this column, congressional committees have been holding hearings with chief executives of the Big Three automakers about the pros and cons of bailing out that ailing industry. At this point, the debate is whether a $25 billion bridge...
Keeping Youth Safe: It Takes a Neighborhood
It may take a village to raise a child, but it takes a neighborhood to keep one safe. That's the message from new research looking at the impact of neighborhood-level factors on aggressive and delinquent behavior among urban adolescents. This...
Knowledge Gap Exists on Best Practices for PTSD
CHICAGO -- Two studies suggest that community-level mental health professionals are likely to assist active military personnel, veterans, and their families, but many feel unequipped to do so effectively. Responses to a 38-item online survey of...
Many Medical Practices Ill Prepared for Disasters
SAN DIEGO -- About one-third of medical practices have no emergency medical preparedness plan to deal with disasters such as hurricanes, floods, wildfires, and terrorist attacks, results from a national survey demonstrated. In fact, more than...
May-December Loves: Mind the Gap?
Spring-winter romance and marriage are nothing new. In Chaucer's "Merchant's Tale," 60-year-old "January" takes late teenager "May" as his bride, extolling the appeal of a young woman who can be molded "like warm wax." In a letter written in 1745,...
Menopausal Status Affects Depression's Presentation
LAKE BUENA VISTA, FLA. -- Use of hormone therapy and menopausal status can influence the presentation and treatment of major depression, Dr. Susan G. Kornstein said at the annual meeting of the North American Menopause Society. "There is increasing...
Nurture Relationships with Referring Physicians
SAN DIEGO -- Any plan for marketing a medical practice should include a strategy for nurturing relationships with physicians who refer to you, Andrea T. Eliscu, R.N., advised at the annual conference of the Medical Group Management Association....
P4P Is Just One of Many Tools
Health care policy makers' enthusiastic embrace of pay for performance as the dominant strategy to improve quality and rein in health care costs needs to be weighed against significant questions about the program's cost-effectiveness and likely...
Patch Improves Sexual Function in Postmenopausal Women
The testosterone patch improves sexual function and decreases emotional distress in postmenopausal women who have hypoactive sexual desire disorder, but the patch's long-term safety needs to be studied, according to a report. "The increase in...
Policy & Practice
Army and NIMH to Study Suicides The National Institute of Mental Health has signed a memorandum of understanding with the U.S. Army to study suicide and suicidal behavior among active-duty soldiers, National Guard members, and Army Reservists....
Prevalence of Autism in Three States Linked to Precipitation
Autism prevalence in three Western states has been linked to precipitation there, so that the heavier the precipitation, the higher the prevalence of the disorder among genetically vulnerable children, a report in the Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent...
Providers Sought to Offer Free Mental Health Care to Veterans
A volunteer organization is seeking psychiatrists and other mental health professionals to join its network of providers who are helping to meet the demand for services among military personnel returning from Iraq and Afghanistan and their families....
Report Sounds Alarm on Obesity
CHICAGO -- America's state mental health program directors are muscling up to tackle the obesity crisis in persons with serious mental illness. "It's an epidemic within an epidemic," according to Dr. Alan Q. Radke, coeditor of a new, report from...
Returning Vets, Families in Need of Interventions: Substance Abuse Emerging as Top Concern
WASHINGTON -- Combat conditions in Iraq and Afghanistan that foster posttraumatic stress disorder are creating a need for interventions among returning veterans to prevent substance abuse that can emerge as a coping mechanism, according to mental...
St. John's Wort for Depression
The Problem You have a patient who suffers with depression. He is not interested in taking synthetic antidepressants, but asks you about St. John's wort. The Question Is St. John's wort efficacious for the treatment of depression? The...
Traditional Acupuncture Improves PTSD Symptoms in Veterans
CHICAGO -- Brief exposure to acupuncture significantly improved the symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder when this treatment was compared with usual care in a randomized controlled trial in 55 veterans. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM)...
Using Stairs at Work Cuts Cardiovascular Risk
MUNICH -- "No thanks, I'll take the stairs instead." This was the cry that rang through the corridors of University Hospital, Geneva, last year as physicians and nurses participating in the Geneva stair study eschewed elevators in favor of foot...
Yes, We Can (Ethically Change)
As I loosen my American flag tie, and press on to finish this column on the day of our national presidential election, it's hard not to think about change. Once the theme solely of Sen. Barack Obama's campaign ("Change We Can Believe In"), it was so...