Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

Journal furnishing social scientific analysis to understand problems of social policy, politics, and welfare.

Articles from Vol. 30, No. 1, March

A Child's Death: Lessons from Health Care Providers' Texts
This article originates from a research study that explores `what happened' to a 10-year-old child with Rett syndrome, who died from "severe malnutrition" according to a Coroners Service inquest jury. The inquest evidence analyzed, using institutional...
"Active Living": Transforming the Organization of Retirement and Housing in the U.S
We examine the transformation of the social institutions of retirement and housing in the US in the latter part of the 20th century. Using institutional ethnography we explicate a woman's experience relocating to an age segregated community. Her relocation...
Antiracism Discourse: The Ideological Circle in a Child World
Antiracism is a dominant discourse in contemporary societies. The understanding of antiracism, however, varies. Government, through its own textually mediated organization of apparatus, tends to homogenize the discourse. This paper is to demonstrate,...
"Are You Beginning to See a Pattern Here?" Family and Medical Discourses Shape the Story of Black Infant Mortality
Postmodern and poststructuralist theorizations of the interrelations of the particular and the universal have identified women's bodies to be the last frontier for scientific discovery leading to and satisfying the modern compulsion to stabilize and...
Chronic Illness and Academic Accommodation: Meeting Disabled Students' "Unique Needs" and Preserving the Institutional Order of the University
People with disabilities are just one of the groups designated for special attention in relation to equity in postsecondary education. This paper explores the way in which policies that provide academic accommodation for students disabled by chronic...
Dorothy Smith and Knowing the World We Live In
The paper presents an account of the scholarly work of Canadian sociologist, feminist, theorist and activist, Dorothy E. Smith, leading up to her development of institutional ethnography as "a sociology for people." Drawing on selected writings, the...
"For the Family": Asian Immigrant Women's Triple Day
This article examines how Asian immigrant women manage the demands of family, job training, and paid work in their new society. Using institutional ethnography, a feminist research strategy developed by Dorothy Smith, the study begins with the women's...
Turning the Kaleidoscope: Telling Stories in Rhetorical Spaces
In this essay, I reflect on the work of Lorraine Code on Rhetorical Spaces and the work of Dorothy Smith on Institutional Ethnography to explore how stories are translated and seen as though looking through the different turns of a kaleidoscope. The...