Nine

Publication covering sports, fitness and history.

Articles from Vol. 18, No. 1, Fall

A Biography of the Hall of Fame Tigers Second Baseman
Detroit Tigers great Charlie Gehringer was notorious for having nothing to say about himself. His contemporaries didn't have a great deal to say about him either. Yankee pitcher Lefty Gomez, the most voluble of Gehringer's opponents, summed it up:...
Abner Cartwright
Abner Cartwright, Alexander Doubleday ... these composite names stand for an exceedingly odd couple whose identities have been stolen, accomplishments merged, and stories intertwined for more than a century now. In truth, Abner Doubleday and Alexander...
A Tale of Two Teams; A Comparison of the Cubs and White Sox in Chicago
The White Sox's appearance in the 2005 World Series reminded Chicago baseball enthusiasts about "the other drought." The White Sox's previous World Series championship was 1917, a level of futility eclipsed only by their cross-town rival Cubs, who...
Babe's Bats: Headin' Home to Everyone's Hero
It is appropriate that Babe Ruth, the "Sultan of Swat," who transformed baseball from the deadball era to the big-bang era, often was depicted in various photos and films following through after a prodigious swing, cradling a few bats prior to choosing...
Baseball's Whitewash: Sportswriter Wendell Smith Exposes Major League Baseball's Big Lie
On the morning of Sunday, February 19, 1939, Wendell Smith, the assistant sports editor of the Pittsburgh Courier, sat down with National League president Ford Frick in the lobby of the William Penn Hotel in Pittsburgh. Smith wanted to find out for...
Complicated Shadows: Ty Cobb and the Public Imagination
INTRODUCTION Few figures in recent history have been as poorly suited to modern sensibilities as Ty Cobb. Often violent, racist, misogynistic, and misanthropic, he was, in many respects, the antithesis of the egalitarian virtues that American society...
Going South; Professional Baseball's Contraction in Canada
Historically, Canada is second only to the United States as a baseball nation. The League Alliance, recognized by many as the first minor league, had the Tecumseh club of London, Ontario, as a charter member in 1877. The Ontario and Canadian Leagues...
Home Field (Dis)advantage and the "Last-Ups" Effect
INTRODUCTION The rules of baseball have an intriguing quirk that other major-league sports do not have, namely, the sequential order of play which always affords the last at-bat to the home team. We became interested in exploring the strategic effects...
Michael T. Lynch, Jr., Harry Frazee, Ban Johnson and the Feud That Nearly Destroyed the American League
Michael T. Lynch, Jr. Harry Frazee, Ban Johnson and the Feud That Nearly Destroyed the American league Myths die slowly, especially in baseball. If you don't try hard enough to peer through the haze of misinformation, you can still see Abner Doubleday...
"Personally, I Have Nothing against Smoking": The Lethal Alliance between Baseball and the Cigarette
The best-known collision between cigarettes and the national pastime occurred when the American Tobacco Company attempted to use the image of Pittsburgh Pirates great Honus Wagner on a cigarette trading card. As the story is usually told, Wagner expressed...
Player Pay and Productivity in the Reserve Clause and Collusion Eras
INTRODUCTION Professional athletes are among the highest paid workers in the American economy. Their minimum salaries are several times that of the average American salary, and the average wages are an even greater multiple. Among professional athletes,...
Realizing a Kid's Dream of Computerized Baseball
Growing up in the 1950s, we did not have PlayStations, Nintendos, or Xboxes--no video games at all. We did not have 150 channels on cable or satellite TV or VHS movies or DVDs. We had no surround sound or CDs, no cell phones, no personal computers,...