Nine

Publication covering sports, fitness and history.

Articles from Vol. 13, No. 2, Spring

1972: The Year That Changed Everything
In the ever-revolving kaleidoscope of baseball history, a few individual seasons have been noted as pivotal milestones. The year 1901, when the American League assumed Major League status, is often identified as the birth year of the modern Major Leagues....
A Life of Uncertainty: Trials and Tribulations of a Baseball Family
It's the off-season for my husband, but his work isn't over. The month of October is filled with playoffs, World Series games, and most importantly winter meetings, free agency, and finding a job. It's during this time that big-name players sign with...
Baseball Annies, Jack Johnson, and Kenesaw Mountain Landis: How Groupies Influenced the Lengthy Ban on Blacks in Organized Baseball
Baseball Annies have long been a presence in the shadows of organized baseball. For much of baseball history, however, the consensus among sportswriters, players, and the front office was that one did not publicize this aspect of the game's culture....
From out of Left Field
"Gettin' short, Danny?" "Man, I'm so short I need a stepladder to put my boots on." One of the Delta Company grunts laughs and says, "Stubbs is short. When you gettin' out of 'Nam, short-timer?" "Two days and a wake-up. Is that short, or what?"...
Quoting Baseball: The Intellectual Take on Our National Pastime
F. Scott Fitzgerald claimed that baseball was "a game played by idiots for morons." (1) In this paper I will examine the views of the intelligentsia--erudite, "cultured," but nonbaseball individuals, including prominent artists, historians, scientists,...
Roly and the Alderman: A Small Boy and the Black Sox
In search of his 50th home run, Babe Ruth arrived in Chicago behind a fifty-piece brass band. (1) For three straight days in front of huge crowds, some of whom paid as much as $4 for scalped tickets, Ruth tried his best to get number 50. (2) On a 1-1...
Terence Malley (1937-2004)
Shortly after every issue of NINE was published, Terry Malley would send me a handwritten, often highly critical, capsulated article-by-article review of the issue's contents. Terry, a self-admitted recluse and fervent Mets fan, was a valued member of...
Terrier Town: Summer of '49
David Menary. Terrier Town: Summer of '49. Waterloo ON: Wilfred Laurier University Press, 2003. 407 pp. Paper, $25.95 U.S. In terms of genre David Menary's Terrier Town: Summer of '49 is a curious book. On the one hand it is a history, most specifically...
The Cobb-Speaker Scandal: Exonerated but Probably Guilty
In 2002-2003 David Nathan's Say It Is So: A Cultural History of the Black Sox Scandal appeared. It illustrates anew how much and for how long the 1919 "fixed" World Series scandal has dogged baseball. (1) In the same vein Pete Rose's disbarment from...
The Enemies at the Gate: An Economic Debate about the Denouement of Negro League Baseball
Baseball is a perfect metaphor for hope in a democratic society. Richard Greenberg, Take Me Out Webster's New World Dictionary defines the term democracy as "government by the people, directly or through representatives." However, in the United States,...
"The Girls in Europe Is Nuts over Ball Players": Ring Lardner and Virginia Woolf
Separated by much more than the same language, England and the United States have nevertheless long shared a common fascination with sports in which the most basic component involves a confrontation between two people mediated by a short distance and...
Whatever Happened to Synergy? MLB as Media Product
The years 2003 and 2004 were years of divestiture. In a reversal of the trend since the mid-1990s, the news focused on the unlinking of media and sports ownership. In a short period of time, Major League Baseball owners approved Frank McCourt as the...