Nine

Publication covering sports, fitness and history.

Articles from Vol. 15, No. 2, Spring

1919: Eight Myths Out
I started researching down "the B-Sox trail" in September 2002 with the question, "Who deserves the credit for bringing 'the Black Sox scandal' to light?" While Woodward and Bernstein became household names for their role in uncovering the Watergate...
All-American Girls
In the fall of 2005, the Winthrop University Archives in Rock Hill, South Carolina, acquired the papers of Elizabeth "Lib" Mahon, a 1942 graduate of the college and one of only two South Carolinians to play in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball...
Attitudes of Citizens Fifty-Five Years and Older with Regard to Major League Baseball
Three thousand questionnaires and response forms were sent out in 2003 to senior citizens, and an additional three thousand questionnaires were mailed to seniors in 2004. Senior citizen addresses were randomly selected from lists provided by senior...
Bill Schlesinger: An Oral History
Bill Schlesinger, who still lives in his native Cincinnati, is one of those cup-of-coffee players who had but a sip--he appeared in one Major League ballgame on May 4, 1965. One at-bat, without a hit. He's in the record books as Rudy Schlesinger. ...
Blackout: The Untold Story of Jackie Robinson's First Spring Training
Chris Lamb. Blackout: The Untold Story of Jackie Robinson's First Spring Training. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2004. 226 pp. Cloth, $24.95. According to Jules Tygiel, "The Jackie Robinson story is to Americans what the Passover story...
Fandom, Failure, and Despair: An Introspective Look at Professional Baseball in Cleveland
Long ago, when mankind was young and wit was fresh, if someone in an audience called out, "Say something funny," Mort Sahl, the comic, would say: "John Foster Dulles." Today's last-gasp, laugh-getter for desperate comics is some reference to Cleveland. George...
From First Baseman to Primo Basso: The Odd Saga of the Original Pirate King (Tra La!)
After Brooklyn captured the 1899 National League pennant, it seemed only right that the team's most devoted supporters be part of the official tribute to Ned Hanlon's men. Instead of a fancy banquet, the Trolley Dodgers were accorded a testimonial...
Italy in the 2006 World Baseball Classic
Before boarding my flight from Milwaukee to Orlando, where I would serve as the interpreter for Team Italy in the World Baseball Classic, I purchased a copy of USA Today Sports Weekly. There on the cover--beneath a photo of Albert Pujols of the Dominican...
Judge Landis Takes a Different Approach: The 1917 Fixing Scandal between the Detroit Tigers and the Chicago White Sox
The early twenty-first century witnessed the arrival of a new major headache for baseball, namely, evidence that some players had turned to steroids as performance enhancers. Nearly a century earlier, baseball had to deal with scandals concerning the...
Major League Baseball and Myth Making: Roland Barthes's Semiology and the Maintenance of Image
INTRODUCTION It was found in a dusty trunk in a farmhouse attic in Fly Creek, New York, three miles from Cooperstown. It was "undersized, misshapen and obviously homemade" and unlike any other of its kind. (1) It became known as the "Doubleday Baseball"...
Paul Richards: The Wizard of Waxahachie
Paul Richards isn't in baseball's Hall of Fame, but his career had a scope and impact that has taken others there. One of the most intelligent and accomplished baseball men of all time, more competent than many Hall of Famers, Richards is largely forgotten...
Taking the Measure of Baseball Broadcasters: What It Takes to Be a Five-Tool Announcer
"The Giants win the pennant! The Giants win the pennant! The Giants win the pennant!" ... "That ball is high, it is far, it is GONE!" ... "This is Fred Haney, rounding third and heading for home...." From our earliest years, radio broadcasters inform...
The Art and Artifice of Early Radio Baseball Re-Creations
Banished by bedtime to my second floor room, I lay beneath the blankets, a transistor wedged beside my ear. I turned to baseball like heliotrope turns toward the sun. Curt Smith, Voices of the Game How many of us fell asleep at night with the radio...
The Baseball Dreams of Eberhard "Zip" Fuhr and the Reality of Internment Baseball, 1942-1947
He had more nicknames than he could remember. At home his mother called him "Abie," the German contraction for his given name Eberhard. Because he had coal black hair and a dark complexion, a few of his friends called him "Dago," as if he were a thin...