Communication Studies

Publication covering communication, language and linguistics.

Articles from Vol. 57, No. 1, March

A House Divided against Itself Cannot Stand: Problematizing Public and Private in Organized Religion
In this article, I present an ethnographic account of a group of people who formed a housechurch organization, in large part, because they could no longer identify with discourses of mainstream churches. Throughout its history, the arena of American...
(De)centering and (Re)envisioning the Secular Hegemony of Organizational Communication Theory and Research
This special issue provides a forum for organizational communication theory and research that recognizes and seeks to disrupt "secular hegemony." Secular hegemony, or the subjugation of the spiritual, privileges particular worldviews that dominate...
Framing the Work of Art: Spirituality and Career Discourse in the Nonprofit Arts Sector
Members of American culture generally value prestige, material comfort, convenience, accumulation, and ownership (Stewart & Cash, 2006). Many employees believe that these can be earned through a successful career and therefore seek to climb the...
Living Our Mission: A Study of University Mission Building
Over 725,000 students attend Catholic colleges and universities (Steinfels, 2003), comprising the largest private educational system in the United States. Over the past 20 years, they have engaged the question of what makes Catholic institutions of...
Seeking the Spirit: Communication and the (Re)development of a "Spiritual" Organization
An enduring question in organizational research is how member attitudes and beliefs that fall outside of traditional work boundaries are regarded by the institution. Although scholars increasingly incorporate the lived experience of employees in their...
The Jesuit Difference (?): Narratives of Negotiating Spiritual Values and Secular Practices
[Scene 1: Walking to get lunch at the Bistro.] Erika: Chad, how's that reflection on what it means to teach at a Jesuit institution going? Chad: Well, I'm not really sure anyone has ever explained to me what the Jesuit educational value of magis...