Social Education

Official journal of the National Council for the Social Studies.

Articles from Vol. 64, No. 6, October

California Dreams in Southeast Baltimore: Using Technology in a Challenging School Setting
AN ARGUMENT EXISTS that the primary purpose of public schools is to serve as a mechanism of socialization for the dominant culture.(1) Through this mechanism, students are apprenticed in the expectations of the "real world," and classrooms function...
"Dismantling the Wall, One Brick at a Time": Overcoming Barriers to Parochialism in Social Studies Classrooms
VETERAN EIGHTH GRADE social studies educator Geri Collins teaches children whose lives are, for the most part, reasonably sheltered, comfortable, and insular. The educational context she encounters differs greatly from that found in school districts...
Editor's Notebook
WITH THE RIGHT teaching methods, it is possible to engage and educate students in social studies classes that they will remember long after they leave school. Many articles in this issue show that this can be as true in schools where teachers face...
ELECTION 2000: The Keys Point to Gore
TO UNDERSTAND what is really going on in the presidential election of 2000 it is first necessary to ignore the ubiquitous polls and the day-to-day coverage of the campaign. Presidential elections are not decided by how well candidates perform on the...
On Display: Preservice Teachers in the Museum
Students at Baylor University, a private Southern Baptist school, are occasionally accused of "living in a bubble" far removed from the real world. In an effort to make social studies education authentic and innovative, our field-based methods practicum...
The E-Citizen
THE CITIZENSHIP RATIONALE for teaching social studies was well articulated by NCSS in 1992, when it defined social studies as "the integrated study of the social sciences and humanities to promote civic competence:" Teaching for civic competence requires...
The Geography of Connection: Bringing the World to Students
"THAT'S DUMB, MISS!" Teachers who hear this comment from their students often wonder how to make any lesson interesting and engaging. A special challenge faces geography teachers in low-income urban areas or rural communities where poverty and/or isolation...
Thoughts on Wise Practice in the Teaching of Social Studies
RESEARCHERS have sometimes noted the lack of a rich "history of practice" in teaching--including the teaching of social studies. Lee Shulman, for one, has pointed to the rarity of well-developed portrayals of how teachers manage ideas, and not simply...
Transforming the Spirit of Teaching through Wise Practice: Observations of Two Alabama Social Studies Teachers
DEFINING WISE PRACTICE in teaching can be elusive. One glance through an academic database is enough to convince anyone that wise practice is a concept claimed by any number of individuals and/or institutions. In most case studies of wise practice...
U.S. Supreme Court Trends
THE 73 CASES decided by the Supreme Court during the 1999-2000 term included more headline-grabbing decisions than any term in recent memory. Yet, as the following selections suggest, the sum total of the Court's work--especially in the perennially...
Victory at Home and Abroad: The Tuskegee Airmen Research Project and Seminar
I will always remember the day when high school sophomore Drew Brashaw gave a noontime address to the Rotary Club in Dubuque, Iowa. There he stood at the podium, resplendent in his black hobnailed boots and jeans, a black Rage Against the Machine T-shirt,...
Writing about Immigration: Authentic Assessment for U.S. History Students
LIKE MOST URBAN SCHOOLS, Roosevelt Senior High School in Minneapolis faces many challenges--a high rate of absenteeism, a large number of students living in poverty, and an increasing number of students who take English as a Second Language. The faculty...