Social Education

Official journal of the National Council for the Social Studies.

Articles from Vol. 69, No. 5, September

An Internet Guide to Teaching the Constitution
In 2004, Congress passed and President Bush signed legislation designating every September 17 as Constitution Day and suggesting that all schools teach about the Constitution on that day. Since September 17 falls on a Saturday this year, Friday, September...
Casting Freedom, 1860-1862
Thomas Crawford, an American Sculptor, created the full-size figure of Freedom in clay. Molds were made, from which a full-size positive plaster model was cast in five main sections. This model is on view today in the basement rotunda of the Russell...
Connecting with Our Pioneer Past: Letters from the Homestead
When elementary students collaborate in active learning projects that integrate the social studies they greatly advance their literacy skills and civic awareness. They can improve their analysis and ability to solve social problems by using reading...
Editor's Notebook
The best kind of social studies education provides students with imaginative projects, lesson plans and class experiences that stimulate their desire to learn. This issue of Social Education, the first of the new school year, offers articles, lesson...
Enduring Lessons of Justice from the World War II Japanese American Internment
We supported our families; we honored our culture; we believed in our country. We never thought to display any civil disobedience. The U.S.A. was our home too. --Reflections from an 80-year-old Japanese American internment camp detainee In the...
No Time for Tea (Grade Level: Elementary Grades, 3-5)
Introduction Students will learn how the Constitution of the United States provided the framework for the country's democratic form of government. Students also will learn how the Constitution provided for representation within the government. A...
Philip Reid and the Statue of Freedom
The Statue of Freedom stands at the very top of the dome of the Capitol, where Congress meets in Washington, D.C. The dome, with its statue, is a symbol recognized all over the world. This statue was designed in the mid-1850s, as arguments between...
Private V. Public Rights (Grade Level: High School, 9-12)
Introduction Students will learn how the Fifth Amendment to the Constitution relates to private property and how the power of eminent domain was defined in a recent Supreme Court case. Students will review summaries from Kelo v. New London to gain...
Resolution and Letter to Congress from the Constitutional Convention
The United States Constitution is the longest-lasting written national constitution in the world. Its four parchment pages serve as the blueprint for a government under which more than 290 million Americans live. Its brevity and eloquence have inspired...
Social Studies and the Social Order: Transmission or Transformation?
"Research & Practice," established early in 2001. features educational research that is directly relevant to the work of classroom teachers. Here, I invited William Stanley to bring a historical perspective to the perennial question, "Should social...
"Telling Tales": The Teaching of American History through Storytelling
The late novelist Walker Percy once argued that literature, especially fictional stories, has portrayed a clearer and far more cohesive picture of the human condition than any of the social sciences, including history. (1) His ideas hint at the possibility...
The Kingdom of Heaven: Teaching the Crusades
The attacks of September 11th, followed by U.S. military actions in Afghanistan and Iraq, have brought greater attention to the simmering conflict between Islam and the West-a conflict most brutally played out historically during the Crusades. The...
The Shadow War
"There is always a possibility that a secret police may become a menace to flee government and free institutions because it carries with it the possibility of abuses of power which are not always quickly apprehended or understood." --The Church...