Education Next

A quarterly scholarly journal of the Hoover Institution that explores issues relating to education policy and K-12 education reform in the United States.

Articles from Vol. 3, No. 3, Summer

Comparable Worth: Salary Data Fail to Account for the Shorter Workday and Work Year in Teaching. Once Adjusted, Teacher Salaries Look about Right. (Forum)
IT IS AN ARTICLE OF FAITH AMONG MANY SUPPORTERS OF public education that teachers are underpaid. As Gayla Hudson, a former National Education Association official, once put it, "Until you start paying teachers at the level that other professions receive,...
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Crowd Control: An International Look at the Relationship between Class Size and Student Achievement. (Research)
REDUCING CLASS SIZES IS ONE OF TODAY'S MOST popular education reform strategies. The Education Commission of the States estimates that such efforts cost states $2.3 billion during the 1999-00 school year alone. The federal government contributed another...
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Facade of Excellence. (Feature)
Stuyvesant High, one of New York City's elite exam schools, enjoys an ultramodern building, influential alumni, and the city's brightest students, If only it could also escape the corrosive rules of the teachers' contract. ON A BITTERLY COLD Saturday...
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Fringe Benefits: There Is More to Compensation Than a Teacher's Salary. (Check the Facts)
Each year, the two national teacher unions, the American Federation of Teachers (AFT) and the National Education Association (NEA), release their surveys of public school teacher salaries across the nation. And each year, they take advantage of this...
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High-Stakes Research: The Campaign against Accountability Has Brought Forth a Tide of Negative Anecdotes and Deeply Flawed Research. Solid Analysis Reveals a Brighter Picture. (Feature)
"MAKE-OR-BREAK EXAMS GROW, BUT BIG Study Doubts Value" intoned a front-page New York Times headline in December 2002. The article continued, "Rigorous testing that decides whether students graduate, teachers win bonuses, and schools are shuttered does...
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Learning to Earn: More Stringent High-School Graduation Requirements May Reduce Students' Chances of Earning a Diploma. but Higher Standards Also Improve Their Ability to Find a Job. (Research)
DURING THE 19705, NEARLY EVERY STATE IN the nation began instituting tests of basic skills for high-school students as the leading edge of the so-called "first wave" of education reforms, These reforms were a response to the widespread impression that...
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Locked Down. (Feature)
THE DEBATE over school choice may be about to take a new turn. For years, reformers of left and right have dueled over whether the best way to shake up poorly performing public schools is to provide parents with the opportunity to switch to private...
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Low Pay, Low Quality: For Decades the Nation Has Been Able to School Its Children on the Cheap by Exploiting a Trapped Workforce of Educated Women. Those Days Are Long Gone. (Forum)
ARE TEACHERS UNDERPAID? As an economist, I find it difficult to question market outcomes. Goods and services generally cost the market price. Only in the event of some kind of "market failure" do we say that goods or services are either over- or...
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Meet Mr. Shannon: At Bronx Prep, a Master Teacher Shares His Expertise. (Education Matters to Me)
At the Bronx Preparatory Charter School we enjoy the talents of a aster teacher, Frederick Shannon. He had been teaching 5th grade in the classroom next door to our principal, Marina Bernard Damiba, when she began her career through Teach for America...
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More Than Just Pay: Higher Salaries Will Accomplish Little without Bolder Reforms. (from the Editors)
Are teachers paid too little? This has been more of an assumption than a question in recent decades. Even raising the issue carries the risk of being labeled anti-education. Nonetheless, a few of our intrepid authors dared to tackle the subject in...
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Philosopher or King? the Ideas and Strategy of Legendary AFT Leader Albert Shanker. (Feature)
THE MOST INFLUENTIAL VOICES IN AMERICAN EDUCATION during the 19th century and the first half of the 20th century were surely Horace Mann and John Dewey, respectively. But who ranks as the most consequential figure of the past 50 years? One of the many...
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Security Detail: An Inside at Safety and Discipline in the Hyperlegalized World of a New York City High School. (Feature)
AT THE HEIGHT OF THE BABY boom, Jamaica High School in Queens, New York, enrolled approximately 5,000 students, who attended school in triple session. Each cohort of students had to start and end school at a different time in order to maximize classroom...
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The Great Unknown: Does the Black-White Test-Score Gap Narrow or Widen through the School Years? It Depends on How You Measure. (Check the Facts)
Educational Achievement and Black-White Inequality By Jonathan Jacobsen, Cara Olsen, Jennifer Kinq Rice, Stephen Sweetland, and John Ralph National Center for Education Statistics, July 2001. Through the 1960s, African-Americans earned much...
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