Education Next

A quarterly scholarly journal of the Hoover Institution that explores issues relating to education policy and K-12 education reform in the United States.

Articles from Vol. 11, No. 2, Spring

Blocked, Diluted, and Co-Opted
As education policy churns through fad after fad, merit pay is really hot right now. The U. S. Department of Education asked states to include proposals for implementing teacher merit pay--pay based on classroom performance--in their 2010 applications...
Catholic Ethos, Public Education: How the Christian Brothers Came to Start Two Charter Schools in Chicago
Train a child in the way he should go, and when he is old he will not turn from it. --Proverbs 22:6 It wasn't exactly a marriage made in heaven. In fact, the idea that one of the Catholic Church's most respected religious orders might run...
Cell Phones Are Ringing: Will Educators Answer?
Teachers often participate in professional development programs to stay on top of technology they could use to teach their students. Rarely, however, do they look at potential roles for technology their students are already using. The cell phone is...
Challenging the Gifted: Nuclear Chemistry and Sartre Draw the Best and Brightest to Reno
Alex Wade's field is linguistics. In his search for the perfect language-and "annoyed," he says, with Esperanto-he has created 10 languages and 30 or 40 alphabets, including one language without verbs, just for the challenge. He's taking courses at...
Does Whole - School Performance Pay Improve Student Learning?
Merit pay proponents argue that monetary incentives for better teaching can improve the quality of instruction in our nation's classrooms. Yet only a handful of studies have evaluated the impact of teacher merit pay on student achievement. These studies...
Happy 10th Anniversary, Education Next!
Ten years ago we launched Education Next. When Laura Bush made the occasion her premier speaking appearance as first lady, we realized we had a chance to make an impact. On that cold, wintry day in February 2001, at the Willard Hotel, some 200 people...
Lessons for Online Learning: Charter Schools' Successes and Mistakes Have a Lot to Teach Virtual Educators
Advocates for virtual education say that it has the power to transform an archaic K-12 system of schooling. Instead of blackboards, schoolhouses, and a six-hour school day, interactive technology will personalize learning to meet each student's needs,...
Lights, Camera, Action! Using Video Recordings to Evaluate Teachers
Way back in 1989, James Q. Wilson defined "coping organizations" as those in which managers can neither observe the activities of frontline workers nor measure their results. Police departments were perfect examples, as supervisors could not watch...
Merit Pay International: Countries with Performance Pay for Teachers Score Higher on PISA Tests
American 15-year-olds continue to perform no better than at the industrial-world average in reading and science, and below that in mathematics. According to the results of the 2009 Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) tests, released...
New Schools in New Orleans: School Reform Both Exhilarated and Imperiled by Success
Five years after Hurricane Katrina, the New Orleans public schools bear little resemblance to the disintegrating system that was further undone by the catastrophic flood. Two-thirds of city schools in 2004 were rated "Academically Unacceptable" under...
Taking Stock of a Decade of Reform: School Reformers Have Made Forward Strides in the Last Ten Years, and Public Debate Has Acquired a Bipartisan Cast. but Just How Successful Have Reform Efforts Been? the Editors of Education Next Assess the Movement's Victories and Challenges
A Battle Begun, Not Won Many education reformers are feeling optimistic these days, willing to claim that they have won the war of ideas and that all that remains is mopping up a few leftover messes and working out the details of the new education...
The Education Reform Book Is Dead: Long Live Education Reform
For this 10th anniversary issue, Education Next asked me to highlight the education reform books, released over the last decade, that define currently dominant education-reform strategies. For any previous decade, this would be relatively easy to do....
The Ninth Circuit V. Reality: Highly Qualified Teachers Don't Grow on Trees
The No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) has been a bold assertion of federal government power vis-a-vis the states. But a 9th Circuit case from California, Renee v. Duncan, provides a reminder that federalism still lives, even in NCLB. The case involves...