Contemporary Review

Founded in 1866, Contemporary Review is a scholarly journal published quarterly. Contemporary Review Company Ltd. owns and publishes this journal, and its editorial headquarters is in Oxford, United Kingdom.Contemporary Review covers a number of topics, including politics, international affairs, literature, art and art history. Its region and its audience are international. Dr. Richard Mullen is the editor; Dr. Alex Kerr is the managing editor; Dr. James Munson is the literary editor; and Anselma Bruce is the associate editor. James LoGerfo, Robin Findlay and Charles Foster are the editorial advisers.

Articles from Vol. 294, No. 1705, June

Black Economic Empowerment and South Africa
SOUTH Africa has always been plagued by inequality. From settler-colonialism, through enforced industrialisation, to apartheid capitalism and the eventual attainment of democracy, the nation's history has always been marked by conflict and inequality....
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Britain's Forgotten Prime Minister: Harold Wilson
THE youngest Cabinet minister since Pitt, he was among the youngest prime ministers Britain has known, and one of the longest serving. Harold Wilson was perhaps the most dominant Labour politician of the latter half of the twentieth century. His record...
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Dickens, John Clare and Mr Dick: The Possibilities of a Celebrated Literary 'Madman' in Dickens's Creation
SCHOLARSHIP has been applied with energy and profundity, for many years now, to the subject of Dickens's depiction of mental derangement; medical men (notably Russell Brain in his collection of essays, Some Reflections on Genius in 1960) have added...
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Ethnic Identity and Mass Immigration in the European Union: Part Two
THE six 'case profiles' I presented in Part One (March, page 9, Vol. 294, No. 1704), and many more examples that one can adduce, show clearly that throughout the six decades after World War II the vitality of historical nations and ethnic groups continued...
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From Imagination to Idolatry: The World of Alexander Solzhenitsyn
ONE night in early August 2008, my daughter, then aged nineteen and staying in Devon, sent a text to my mobile phone: 'Alexander Solzhenitsyn died tonight. Sorry'. It was clear from her text that she had grasped the strange sense of connection that...
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Political Disengagement in Australia
THE Australian economy is booming (the 'Wonder Downunder'). It is the only major Western economy to avoid a recession in the global financial crisis, with unemployment at 5.2 per cent, and a record number of foreigners who would like to live here....
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Sonatina for Oboe and Bayonet
I I was surprised when my daughter, Laura, told me she was reading All Quiet on the Western Front at school. Erich Maria Remarque's great war novel from 1929 seemed a curious choice for children of her age. It's a long time since I've read it, but...
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Teaching by Numbers-Inside the Modern Classroom
BREAK-time in a British secondary school staff room. Some of the teachers are debating whether teaching has improved since their own school days. The younger ones insist that it has. The older ones argue that it hasn't so much improved as changed....
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The Palestinian Struggle for an Independent State: Retrospect and Prospects
THE Palestinians became dispossessed refugees throughout the Middle East after the creation of the state of Israel in 1948. Since then Palestinians have clung to the dream of a restoration and their return to Palestine. The Arab states opposed the...
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The Queen's Diamond Jubilee
LAST year, when staying in a small Austrian spa town, I went to check out of my hotel. The manageress was not there so the woman in charge of cleaning sorted out my bill. We got into conversation and spoke of life in Britain and Austria, of politics,...
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The World of Paperbacks
VINTAGE CLASSICS have brought out three of Anthony Trollope's novels which taken together give a fair sampling of his work: The Warden ([pounds sterling]5.99) was published in 1855 and was the first of his famous Barchester series; Can You Forgive...
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Two Nineteenth-Century Philosemites
NON-JEWISH philosemites have been mostly Protestant Zionists who believed the return of Jews to Palestine is predicted in the Bible. At the present time this is most frequently seen in the American evangelicals who often support Israel. However, there...
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