American Forests

The objectives of American Forests, publisher of American Forests magazine, are to help people plant and care for trees for ecosystem restoration and healthier communities.

Articles from Vol. 108, No. 3, Autumn

3 States' New Liberty. (Clippings)
Liberty, independence, and democracy are weighty ideals for a 2-foot sapling to embody but citizens of Boston; Hartford, Connecticut; and Newport, Rhode Island, this summer honored tiny trees with a celebrated lineage and a personal connection to those...
Hogans of Hope: In Arizona, a Project to Build Traditional Navajo Housing Helps the Community as It Heals the Forest
Mae Franklin's office is a traditional Navajo hogan. Through the open door, she can gaze across the Little Colorado River gorge toward the Painted Desert, Canyon de Chelly, and Sisnaajini, the sacred Navajo mountain of the east. Her one-room octagonal...
Letters
REMEMBERING SEPTEMBER 11 AMERICAN FORESTS: I just recently donated money to plant a tree for my son Carl, one of the firefighters killed on Sept. 11th. I knew nothing about this until I went into the Eddie Bauer store on a trip to Penn. I will tell...
Making the Most of Wasted Wood. (Clippings)
AMERICAN FORESTS will help Baltimore develop a plan to reuse inner city wood waste while creating new jobs and reforesting the urban landscape, thanks to a grant from the U.S. Forest Service's Northeast Area. The Inner City Project grant awarded to...
Monks and Kids Plant in Cambodia. (Clippings)
As Cambodia rebuilds after decades of devastating warfare, a key task will be environmental restoration. As one part of that effort, AMERICAN FORESTS is helping with a tree-planting project that counts schoolchildren and Buddhist monks among its dedicated...
News from the World of Trees. (Clippings)
TREES TAKE CENTER FIELD Sunday, September 8, was a perfect day for baseball. As a breeze wafted the smell of peanuts and hot dogs onto the field and the grounds crew prepared for the game against the Detroit Tigers, the Yankees took the field ......
Once Again, a Land of Eagles: Once Bordering on Extinction, Our National Symbol Is Making a Soaring Comeback in Forests Nationwide
In the aftermath of September 11, national symbols took on a whole new meaning. Flags sprouted from car windows, strip malls, and politicians' lapels. Americans sang the national anthem and "God Bless America" with fervor, and an American bald eagle...
Quercus Quandary; as Beetles Kill Millions of Trees, a Debate Rages in the Ozarks: Replenish Red Oaks or Leave Them Alone?
A million acres of dead trees, and more dying. That's a conservative estimate of the damage (lone to date by a particular beetle, the red oak borer, throughout the Ozark highlands forest region of Arkansas and Missouri. It's a plague of biblical...
Reviving the Bitterroot: This Montana Planting Project Shows That People and Trees Are Equally Resilient after the Catastrophic Wildfires of 2000. (Communities)
Look, here's a ponderosa pine seedling growing on its own, Steve Kamps says. Here's another one, calls Jon Hayes. Both are foresters for the Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation (DNRC). We were four adults acting like children...
Saluting Maryland's Fallen Champ
At nearly 100 feet tall, the Wye Oak, the long-standing national champion white oak and Maryland's state tree, seemed to fill the skyline. Its gnarled trunk stretched upward, reaching with massive limbs to cradle a crown spread of nearly 120 feet....
Song and Sprawl. (Clippings)
Yellowstone National Park is one of the most famous of America's protected areas, providing crucial habitat to many wildlife species. But recent research suggests the lands surrounding the park may be even more important. In a study published in...
Steely Nature: Using Iron-Willed Concentration, a Washington, DC, Sculptor Immortalizes Local Trees with National Acclaim. (Earth Keepers)
Even after being felled by weather, disease, or old age, our nation's famous and historic trees live on in the minds of many Americans. Ira Bloom wants to make sure those memories live on forever. Since discovering AMERICAN FORESTS' Historic Tree Nursery...
Sweet-Smelling Forest Threat. (Clippings)
As large-scale agriculture shifts west and portions of the northeastern United States return to woods, forest recovery and species diversity are being challenged by a sweet-smelling but aggressive adversary, honeysuckle. Three Asian species, L....
The Popular Pin Oak. (in Profile)
The native pin oak (Quercus palustris) suffers a bit from overexposure, much like an actor when he or she becomes a star and reaches celebrity status. People will either love you or hate you, but there are few emotions in between. The pin oak's...
The Trees with Soul. (Highlighting Historic Trees)
We all know the story of the poor boy from Tupelo, Mississippi, who moved with his parents to Memphis, Tennessee. The teenager loved music, especially that which sprang from the working classes--Gospel traditions as well as the black rhythm and blues...
Trees in Black & White: Simple Truths Are Sometimes the Hardest, and the Woods Are Suffering While We Learn. (Editorial)
Most of us learn the world is not black and white before we're old enough to make decisions affected by that simple truth. Yet there's another simple truth a lot of us have missed: Forests aren't black and white either. That point seems to be missing...
Trees That Ease Learning: When Students Open Their School Books This Autumn, Here's Why You'll Want Greenery Nearby. (Perspectives)
When the weather gets warm, students take to the outdoors for class. It's one reason the students in Lynn Speed's class at Wisconsin's Cedarburg High School raised an unprecedented $700 for AMERICAN FORESTS' "A Tree for Every Child" program. In addition...
Washington Outlook
Senate Majority Leader Tom Doschle (SD) put Congress, the Administration, the forest industry, and environmental groups in a dither in July when he inserted en amendment into an emergency supplemental appropriations hill. His amendment recognized the...