Antiquity

Antiquity is a quarterly journal that was founded in 1927. The publication issues peer-reviewed articles on world archaeology. Antiquity is published by Antiquity Publications, Ltd. It is owned by the Antiquity Trust. Headquarters is in York, United Kingdom. The journal is edited by Martin Carver, emeritus professor of archaeology at the University of York. It is also produced by members of the directors of the Antiquity Publications, Ltd., including Chris Evans, Roger Guthrie, Martin Millett, Nicky Milner, Cameron Petrie, Mike Pitts and Andrew Rogerson

Articles from Vol. 73, No. 281, September

A Generic Geomorphological Approach to Archaeological Interpretation and Prospection in British River Valleys: A Guide for Archaeologists Investigating Holocene Landscapes
Introduction Alluvial landscapes offer some of the most attractive environments for human activity and settlement. Utilized since early prehistoric times, they have been the subject of intense worldwide archaeological and geoarchaeological research...
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Among the New Books
Ancient Biomolecules Initiative Ancient Biomolecules 2:2-3. A Special issue marking the conclusion of the N.E.B.C. Thematic Programme, Ancient Biomolecules Initiative (A.B.L): papers presented at the A.B.L Grand Finale held at the Natural History...
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Assessing Earliest Human Settlement of Eurasia: Late Pliocene Dispersions from Africa
Introduction The timetable of human dispersions remains a matter of major interest, whether the focus of attention centres on earliest colonization of Europe or on the wider pattern of appearance in Eurasia (Turner 1992; Huang et al. 1995; Wood...
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Changing Places
'Rummidge and Euphoria are places on the map of a comic world which resembles the one we are standing on without corresponding exactly to it, and which is peopled by figments of the imagination.' (LODGE 1983: 6) Landscapes have become a major...
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Chewing Tar in the Early Holocene: An Archaeological and Ethnographic Evaluation
Introduction Amorphous lumps of putative tar with human tooth impressions have been recovered from several prehistoric sites in Scandinavia (e.g. Bang-Andersen 1976; Larsson 1982; Johansson 1990; Regnell et al. 1995; Hernek & Nordqvist 1995),...
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Comments on the Interpretation of the So-Called Cattle Burials of Neolithic Central Europe
Cattle burials in Neolithic Europe The cattle burials of Neolithic Europe offer an interesting means of access to early belief systems. Burials of up to 10 animals have been reported, either near or within human graves, or unconnected with humans...
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Construction of National Identity and Origins in East Asia: A Comparative Perspective
Archaeology in East Asia Many authors have remarked that archaeology in East Asia is part of the discipline of history (Chang 1981: 148; Ikawa-Smith 1975: 15; Nelson 1995: 218; Olsen 1987: 282-3; von Falkenhausen 1993). Furthermore, it is more 'locally...
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Contested Ethnicities and Ancient Homelands in Northeast Chinese Archaeology: The Case of Koguryo and Puyo Archaeology
Introduction In many countries of east Asia, archaeological knowledge is frequently used in the construction of ethnic histories, and the discipline of archaeology is often employed to emphasize ethnic and cultural identities (Fawcett 1995; Nelson...
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Defining a Contemporary Landscape Approach: Concluding Thoughts
In the above papers, two of the participants begin by quoting the cultural geographer Carl Sauer. From my perspective, the recognition given to Sauer by DUNNING and his colleagues as well as GARTNER is timely and important, since it reminds us that...
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Editorial
* On 6 May 1999, the Scots elected their first parliament in 300 years. On the same day, the Welsh elected their assembly. The politics of these events is strongly related to culture, as recent Celtic debates in the pages of ANTIQUITY and The Scotsman...
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Handaxes: Products of Sexual Selection?
Introduction: unanswered questions about handaxes Handaxes are bifacially manufactured stone artefacts, predominantly pointed or ovate in shape. Along with cleavers, which have a wide, straight edge at right angles to the major axis of the artefact,...
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Initial Upper Palaeolithic in South-Central Turkey and Its Regional Context: A Preliminary Report
Introduction The earliest Upper Palaeolithic industries of southwest Asia have been documented in a relatively small number of localities widely scattered throughout the eastern Mediterranean. These assemblages share a number of features, including...
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Intensive Agriculture and Socio-Political Development in the Lake Patzcuaro Basin, Michoacan, Mexico
Introduction Intensive agriculture played a pivotal role in the development of archaic states, but there is considerable debate concerning its relationship to population growth, climatic variability, and centralization. One important example is...
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Intrasite Spatial Organization of Lithic Production in the Middle Palaeolithic: The Evidence of the Abric Romani (Capellades, Spain)
Introduction At present, the subject of spatial occupation strategies in the Middle Palaeolithic (MP) cannot be separated from the broader question of the Upper Palaeolithic (UP) transition and the biological changes that come with such transformation....
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Introductory Comments
When I first read these papers my first thought was how curious it was that although archaeologists on both side of the Atlantic have enthusiastically begun to focus on socio-cultural landscapes there has not been a great deal of cross-ocean communication....
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Iron Age Inhumation Burials at Yarnton, Oxfordshire
Introduction Formal burials dated to the Iron Age are not common in the British archaeological record, although they become more usual from the 1st century BC onwards (Whimster 1981; Cunliffe 1991: 505). Iron Age inhumation cemeteries are found...
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Jomon Archaeology and the Representation of Japanese Origins
Since 1992, on-going excavations of the Early to Middle Jomon period Sannai Maruyama site (3500-2000 BC) have uncovered the large size and complexity of this prehistoric hunter-gatherer settlement. Sannai Maruyama, furthermore, has become the first...
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Late Woodland Landscapes of Wisconsin: Ridged Fields, Effigy Mounds and Territoriality
Sauer (1925) saw the terrestrial scene as more than a natural arena for human action. He recognized the repeated human impact on a living earth which created an ever-changing stage of landscape. Geographical conceptions of landscape have changed in...
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Letting the Past Serve the Present - Some Contemporary Uses of Archaeology in Viet Nam
Archaeology and history in Viet Nam Viet Nam has a long tradition of scholarly concern with its own past, born out of 900 years of resistance to Chinese political domination. As early as the 11th century, the newly independent Ly dynasty encouraged...
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Lithics Limited
These books belong to the same disciplinary tradition of lithic studies and have complementary values. However, they represent different categories of book. The specialized subject of the book edited by Baena Preysler only appears summarized in the...
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Nationalism and Preserving Korea's Buried Past: The Office of Cultural Properties and Archaeological Heritage Management in South Korea
Introduction The origins of Korean archaeological heritage management can be traced to 1916, when Japan's Resident-general Government in Korea (Chosen Sotokufu: 1910-1945) promulgated the first comprehensive laws of historical preservation called...
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Neo-Environmental Determinism and Agrarian 'Collapse' in Andean Prehistory
Introduction: neo-environmentalism in Andean archaeology In early anthropology, environmental determinism was used to explain race, human demography, material culture, cultural variation and cultural change. As anthropological interpretation evolved,...
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Redirected Light on the Indigenous Mediterranean
The characterization of the indigenous is a current concern of many archaeologists with a global vision (Funari et al. 1999). In the Mediterranean, the direct and indirect, explicit and implicit power and authority of the colonizer have dominated historically....
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Special Section Dynamic Landscapes and Socio-Political Process: The Topography of Anthropogenic Environments in Global Perspective
Landscape archaeology: towards a definition Sander Van Der Leeuw, in his recent plenary address at the 1998 Society for American Archaeology Meetings, suggested that archaeology as a discipline has moved its emphasis from site to settlement pattern,...
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Special Section Heritage and Archaeology in the Far East
It is rare to encounter East Asian Archaeology in English, and in a form accessible to a general readership. We are delighted to present this Special section, which started life as a Session at the Society of American Archaeology in Seattle in 1998....
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Temple Mountains, Sacred Lakes, and Fertile Fields: Ancient Maya Landscapes in Northwestern Belize
'Intimate knowledge of historical sources, archaeological sites, biogeography and ecology, and the processes of geomorphology must be fused in patient field studies, so that we may read the changes in habitability through human time for the lands in...
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The Existence of Andronovo Cultural Influence in Xinjiang during the 2nd Millennium BC
The Andronovo culture, a Bronze Age complex flourishing in the 2nd millennium BC, comprised a number of regional variants and covered an extensive area stretching from the Urals eastward to the Yenisey river, and from the northern border of the forest-steppe...
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The Knowable, the Doable and the Undiscussed: Tradition, Submission, and the 'Becoming' of Rural Landscapes in Denmark's Iron Age
Farmers in Late Iron Age Denmark lived in centuries-old villages, within territories inhabited for millennia. Long-held patterns of settlement, movement, economic interaction and socio-political structure characterized the cultural landscapes of these...
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Who Were the Ancestors? the Origins of Chinese Ancestral Cult and Racial Myths
Introduction Ancestor worship has been a dominant religious form in ancient as well as modern China. It has shaped thought and behaviour for millennia, and has been used by elites as propaganda legitimizing their political positions. Ancestors can...
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