Antiquity

Antiquity is a quarterly journal that was founded in 1927. The publication issues peer-reviewed articles on world archaeology. Antiquity is published by Antiquity Publications, Ltd. It is owned by the Antiquity Trust. Headquarters is in York, United Kingdom. The journal is edited by Martin Carver, emeritus professor of archaeology at the University of York. It is also produced by members of the directors of the Antiquity Publications, Ltd., including Chris Evans, Roger Guthrie, Martin Millett, Nicky Milner, Cameron Petrie, Mike Pitts and Andrew Rogerson

Articles from Vol. 71, No. 271, March

An Approach to the Study of Ancient Archery Using Mathematical Modelling
The archer's bow is a machine whose purpose is to impart stored energy effectively and accurately to propel the arrow. A mathematical modelling of different bow types shows how their engineering characteristics define their performances. Introduction...
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Beazley as Theorist
Sir John Beazley (1885-1970), founder of the modern and archaeological study of Classical vases, was a master of method. Is the Beazley method just that, a well-judged method fitting to the material under study? Or does that considered method in truth...
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Celtic Myths
In ANTIQUITY a year ago, Vincent & Ruth Megaw found a useful parallel between the multiple definitions of the ancient Celts, as it can be seen from varied sources, and the several ways an individual's ethnic identity is seen and defined in the contemporary...
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Constraining the Age of the Coa Valley (Portugal) Engravings with Radiocarbon Dating
Radiocarbon ages for the Coa petroglyphs are very similar to those obtained by Watchman (1995). Fundamental problems in the use of radiocarbon dating at Coa include evidence for the addition of younger carbon in an open system, and evidence of contamination...
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Crypt Archaeology after Spitalfields: Dealing with Our Recent Dead
A decade ago, the crammed burial-vaults under Christ Church, Spitalfields, a fine English Baroque church in east-central London designed by Hawksmoor, were archaeologically excavated. This pioneering work in the post-medieval archaeology of our own culture's...
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Cultural Stratigraphy at Mezhirich, an Upper Palaeolithic Site in Ukraine with Multiple Occupations
The later Palaeolithic sites on the East European plain are celebrated for their solid buildings constructed of mammoth bones. Were these permanent settlements, occupied all the year round? Or were they seasonally occupied, in a land where winters are...
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Derivation of Ancient Egyptian Faience Core and Glaze Materials
An essential ingredient of the lovely blues in ancient Egyptian materials - faience, glazes, frits - is copper. How did the knowledge of that copper use arise? There is a telling congruence with Egyptian techniques in drilling stone artefacts, and the...
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Establishing the Chinese Archaeological School: Su Bingqi and Contemporary Chinese Archaeology
Most of what is heard in the West of Chinese archaeology is about the physical stuff - the astonishing string of major finds; some, like soldiers from the Terracotta Army of the First Emperor's tumulus, have been exhibited outside China. All archaeological...
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Floating Obsidian and Its Implications for the Interpretation of Pacific Prehistory
A piece of pumice among drift material on Nadikdik Atoll, Marshall Islands, in far Micronesia had a large chunk of flakeable obsidian attached. As the atoll had been devastated by a typhoon and associated storm surge in 1905, the piece must have arrived...
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Geophysical Surveys of Stratigraphically Complex Island California Sites: New Implications for Household Archaeology
Ground-penetrating radar and other geophysical techniques are known to produce useful data when deposits are crisply structured, as in the case of sub-surface masonry walls or large ditches. New studies of Californian coastal sites find the methods are...
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'Leaving More Than Footprints': Modern Votive Offerings at Chaco Canyon Prehistoric Site
A 'heritage manager' who wishes a quiet and an orderly life may hope their heritage place is culturally dead; whatever meaning it once had, now it is an archaeological site, an ancient monument, a tourist attraction. But many sites are not dead. Chaco...
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Maximum Ages of the Coa Valley (Portugal) Engravings Measured with Chlorine-36
Panel faces in the Coa valley, Portugal, were available for engraving during the Upper Palaeolithic, according to 36Cl exposure ages of 16,000 to 136,000 years. Introduction The Coa valley petroglyphs in Portugal have a style indicative of a Palaeolithic...
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Mildenhall: Memories of Mystery and Misgivings
Half a century on, the principals in the Mildenhall affair are deceased. Paul Ashbee, senior prehistorian of East Anglia, has no direct evidence, but material recollections from near to the time. His account, drawing on those memories, notices aspects...
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New Optical and Radiocarbon Dates from Ngarrabullgan Cave, a Pleistocene Archaeological Site in Australia: Implications for the Comparability of Time Clocks and for the Human Colonization of Australia
The human settlement of Australia falls into that period where dating is hard because it is near or beyond the reliable limit of radiocarbon study; instead a range of luminescence methods are being turned to (such as thermoluminescence at Jinmium: December...
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Prehistory Down Under: Archaeological Investigations of Submerged Aboriginal Sites at Lake Jasper, Western Australia
Much of Australian prehistory lies under water. Although confined to the continent's extreme southwestern corner, field studies described in this report show that this submerged prehistoric component is very real, with numerous archaeological sites and...
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Refuse and the Formation of Middens
The prodigious quantities of refuse recovered from excavations at Runnymede Bridge, Berkshire, England - and at other late prehistoric British sites - highlight those archaeological entities we call 'rubbish' and 'middens'. What is a 'midden'? General...
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Sembiran and the First Indian Contacts with Bali: An Update
Further fieldwork at Sembiran, on Bali in the Indonesian archipelago, tells more about the eastern end of the exchange network running across southern Asia about 2000 years ago. This brief note provides an account of recent excavations undertaken by...
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The Earliest Farmers in Macedonia
Survey in southwest Macedonia provides a new field record of the pattern of Neolithic settlement. It prompts a further opinion in the enduring debate about the nature of the diffusion of agriculture, discussed most recently in ANTIQUITY by van Andel...
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The Mildenhall Treasure: Roald Dahl's Ultimate Tale of the Unexpected?
Just over 50 years ago, the most magnificent treasure of late Antique silver ever found in Britain was brought out of hiding in a sleepy village in rural Suffolk. The late Roald Dahl, the children's writer, may have held the answer. This article brings...
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The Neolithic Great Goddess: A Study in Modern Tradition
Modern belief in the veneration of a single Great Goddess in the European Neolithic is often accompanied by the notion that those cultures of 'Old Europe' were woman-centred in society as well as religion. What is the long history which precedes these...
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The Terminology of Agricultural Origins and Food Production Systems - a Horticultural Perspective
We live, most of us, in agricultural societies; our food comes from the farm. We make gardens, many of us, and we eat some of the plants that we grow there. That farming is not the same as gardening we see in the responses of western observers when they...
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Working at Relationships: Another Look at Animal Domestication
'Animals were wild, and then some of them were tamed and so became domestic.' The archaeological definition of 'domestic' is a fundamental, alongside the means by which the domestic is to be recognized in the archaeological record. Setting that relationship...
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