Antiquity

Antiquity is a quarterly journal that was founded in 1927. The publication issues peer-reviewed articles on world archaeology. Antiquity is published by Antiquity Publications, Ltd. It is owned by the Antiquity Trust. Headquarters is in York, United Kingdom. The journal is edited by Martin Carver, emeritus professor of archaeology at the University of York. It is also produced by members of the directors of the Antiquity Publications, Ltd., including Chris Evans, Roger Guthrie, Martin Millett, Nicky Milner, Cameron Petrie, Mike Pitts and Andrew Rogerson

Articles from Vol. 77, No. 295, March

Agricultural Origins in the Korean Peninsula. (Research)
Introduction The development of agriculture in Korea, as elsewhere, is an important part of landscape evolution and Holocene human adaptation and deserves study in its own right. Furthermore, Korean archaeology can help to clarify the mechanisms...
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A Palaeolithic `Pompeii' at Kostenki, Russia. (Research)
The occurrence of volcanic tephra in Upper Pleistocene deposits in the central part of the Russian Plain is a remarkable phenomenon, not least because the plain lies at a great distance from known areas of volcanic activity. Volcanic ash was first...
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A Wiggle-Match Date for Polynesian Settlement of New Zealand. (Method)
Introduction New Zealand was the last substantial landmass to be colonised by humans before the industrial age. Although it is now well established that the Polynesian settlers of New Zealand originated in central East Polynesia (e.g. Penny et al....
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Centres and Peripheries Amongst Archaeologists-Archaeological Theory after Communism. (Debate)
I would like to invite Antiquity to help generate a new theoretical agenda in the wake of the collapse of communism in eastern Europe--but not by imposing current western archaeological theory on us. Eastern European archaeologists need the chance...
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CORONA Satellite Photography and Ancient Road Networks: A Northern Mesopotamian Case Study. (Method)
Introduction Landscape archaeology has emphasised the role of the entire landscape in ancient life, rather than putting an exclusive focus on those loci of intensive behaviour we call "sites." The broader area of interest requires a corresponding...
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Current Problems in Dating Palaeolithic Cave Art: Candamo and Chauvet. (Method)
Introduction--style versus radiocarbon It is now 12 years since Michel Lorblanchet first coined the term `Post-stylistic era' to denote the new period dawning in Palaeolithic art studies, in which direct dating was going to play the definitive role...
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Dating Resin Coating on Pottery: The Spirit Cave Early Ceramic Dates Revised. (Method)
During the summer of 1966, Chester Gorman, then a Ph.D student at the University of Hawai'i carried out archaeological excavations at the rock-shelter of Spirit Cave in the karst uplands of Mae Hong Son Province, Northwest Thailand (Figure 1), and...
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Direct Dating of Plaster and Mortar Using AMS Radiocarbon: A Pilot Project from Khirbet Qana, Israel. (Method)
Introduction Although radiocarbon dating has been utilised to date important artefacts such as the Dead Sea Scrolls (Jull et al. 1995), archaeologists working on historic-period sites in the Near East generally rely, on techniques such as ceramic...
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Don't Knock the Ancestors. (Debate)
James Whitley (2002) complains of `omnipresent' and `universal' ancestors, invading archaeological theory and student essays. All is not necessarily as bad as he believes. In the British Neolithic, the subject area from which he draws many of his examples,...
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Editorial
ANTIQUITY has moved its office to the Department of Archaeology at the University of York (in north-east England) where it has been welcomed with excitement and affection. Long term subscribers will notice one or two novelties in our first edition:...
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How Reliable Are Radiocarbon Laboratories? A Report on the Fourth International Radiocarbon Inter-Comparison (FIRI) (1998-2001). (Method)
Rationale The most recent radiocarbon inter-comparison exercise (FIRI), completed in 2001, was also the most extensive so far, with 85 laboratories participating. The study was designed firstly to assess the comparability of the results from different...
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In B or Not in B: A Reappraisal of the Natufian Burials at Shukbah Cave, Judaea, Palestine. (Research)
Shukbah cave and its context The Natufian (ca. 13 000-10 500 BP) is a transitional culture between the Palaeolithic and Neolithic ways of life and economic subsistence in the Levant. Archaeological manifestations typical of the Natufian include...
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Internet Archaeology
Published twice yearly; ISSN 1363-5387. 39.50 [pounds sterling] to individuals, 105 [pounds sterling] and US$190 to institutions (access to Volume 1 free). An invitation to review Internet Archaeology (hereafter IA) came as an interesting challenge....
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Mesolithic to Neolithic Transitions: New Results from Shell-Middens in the Western Algarve, Portugal. (Research)
Questions The Algarve shell-midden sites span roughly 9500 to 6500 years before the present and represent the Mesolithic and early Neolithic cultural periods (Table 1). All of the Algarve middens to be discussed contained fire-cracked rock, and...
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Neolithic Transition in Europe: The Radiocarbon Record Revisited. (Research)
Introduction There is a long tradition of using radiocarbon dates to map the spread of farming and the arrival of Neolithic cultures across Europe. Clark (1965) was the first to do this, plotting only the earliest settlements in each territory;...
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Putting the Record Straight: Rock Art and Shamanism. (Debate)
Alice Kehoe (2002: 384-5) proposes divided camps in the study of rock art and contrasts a "popular" interpretation, which ascribes rock art to shamanism, with an "emerging trend" which is more circumspect and reflexive. Such a dichotomy is both unfair...
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Robert J. Braidwood 1907-2003. (Obituary)
Robert J. Braidwood, Professor Emeritus at the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago, died on the 15th of January 2003, at the age of 94 years. He was followed the same day by his wife Linda, aged 92. Both died of pneumonia after 66 years...
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Roman Archaeology: Crisis and Revolution. (Debate)
Keywords: Roman archaeology, Roman empire, post-colonialism Study of the Roman world is underrepresented and marginalised in mainstream archaeological discourse, at least in Anglophone scholarship. This is astonishing, given Rome's role in the creation...
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Style, Chauvet and Radiocarbon. (Method)
On Candamo In the case of LSCE at least, it is not surprising that the two dates obtained from Candamo were the same, since they were obtained from the same (mixed) sample. One way to explain the age discrepancy between LSCE and Geochron is to assume...
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The Aztecs in London at the Royal Academy, Piccadilly, London 2003
To step amongst much of the material for all of one's studies in a few rooms is--as was said of the .Conquistadors' first entry to the Aztec capital--like a dream. Aztecs, at the Royal Academy of Arts, is an amazing experience for the scholar; and...
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The Earliest Writing? Sign Use in the Seventh Millennium BC at Jiahu, Henan Province, China. (Research)
Introduction It has long been accepted that writing is the principal attribute of an advanced society. L H Morgan. (1974:31) claimed that civilisation "begins with the invention of the alphabet ... and the use of writing", while for Frederick Engels...
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The Gravettian Burial Known as the Prince ("Il Principe"): New Evidence for His Age and Diet. (Research)
Introduction "Il Principe" (the Prince) is the nickname given to a spectacular Mid Upper Palaeolithic (Gravettian) burial discovered at Arene Candide, Italy in 1942. Arene Candide is a large cave located about 90 m above sea level on the slope of...
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The Neolithic Transition in Europe: Comparing Broad Scale Genetic and Local Scale Isotopic Evidence. (Research)
Studies of how agriculture spread from the Near East into Central Europe (ca. 7000 - 5000 BC) are essential to theories explaining the origins of the languages, genes and demography of the region. These competing theories (e.g. Price 2000) range from...
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The Private Lives of Pompeii
Channel 4, 30 September 2002 90 minute drama-documentary Director: Richard Curson Smith Producer: John Wyver & Sebastian Grant With the possible exception of the pyramids, Pompeii is arguably the foremost archaeological site in the consciousness...
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The Wolf of Baikal: The "Lokomotiv" Early Neolithic Cemetery in Siberia (Russia). (Research)
The site and its location The territory around Lake Baikal features mountains, lowlands and plateaux, and includes the Watersheds of the Angara, Lena, Selenga, Barguzin, Vitim and other rivers. A favourable climate and a wealth of fauna and flora...
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Thoughts on the `Repacked' Neolithic Revolution. (Research)
Introduction In recent years a number of publications have made a case for the reinstatement of a view of the British Neolithic in which an integrated `package' of cultural innovations and economic practices was introduced abruptly from continental...
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What Is Television Doing for Us? Reflections on Some Recent British Programmes
Ten years ago archaeology seemed to be disappearing from British television screens, but at present any week will yield half a dozen programmes more or less related to the subject. Why is it so popular and what impact does TV have on the subject? This...
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