Antiquity

Antiquity is a quarterly journal that was founded in 1927. The publication issues peer-reviewed articles on world archaeology. Antiquity is published by Antiquity Publications, Ltd. It is owned by the Antiquity Trust. Headquarters is in York, United Kingdom. The journal is edited by Martin Carver, emeritus professor of archaeology at the University of York. It is also produced by members of the directors of the Antiquity Publications, Ltd., including Chris Evans, Roger Guthrie, Martin Millett, Nicky Milner, Cameron Petrie, Mike Pitts and Andrew Rogerson

Articles from Vol. 83, No. 321, September

A 4000 Year-Old Introduction of Domestic Pigs into the Philippine Archipelago: Implications for Understanding Routes of Human Migration through Island Southeast Asia and Wallacea
Introduction Bellwood (1997, 2006) proposed that migrating farming communities from mainland China entered the Philippines via Taiwan between 4000 and 4500 years ago (Ka), bringing with them ground-stone technologies and pottery. Archaeological,...
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A Bayesian Approach to Dating Agricultural Terraces: A Case from the Philippines
Introduction Practices of relative dating techniques in archaeology have been modified by newer and more easily accessible radiometric dating methods (i.e. AMS, TL, etc.) and the realisation that some archaeological strata are not formed by straightforward...
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Academic Freedom, Political Correctness, and Early Civilisation in Chinese Archaeology: The Debate on Xia-Erlitou Relations
Introduction The interpretation of archaeology is inevitably affected by the social, cultural and intellectual background of researchers. This is certainly the situation in the study of early Chinese civilisations and their material remains, particularly...
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A Dugong Bone Mound: The Neolithic Ritual Site on Akab in Umm Al-Quwain, United Arab Emirates
Introduction The Neolithic period in the Oman Peninsula and the Gulf is relatively unexplored. Excavations remain rare, with 20 sites, at most, explored between Kuwait and the Sultanate of Oman. In eastern Arabia in general, the emergence, identity...
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Are Catalans Ignoring Archaeology?
"Ours is a small-scale but a great museum, Small-scale, because it does not house towering Greek sculptures or majestic jewels from ancient Egypt. Great, because it shelters ... our deepest roots. A story that is reconstructed, piece by piece and with...
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Counting Microliths: A Reliable Method to Assess Mesolithic Land Use? in This Debate the Authors Tackle a Problem Fundamental to Researchers and Resource Managers in the Mesolithic Period: What Sort of Prehistory Do Flint Scatters Represent?
Surface scatter assemblages form the majority of the Mesolithic archaeological record in many regions throughout Europe. A central challenge for research is the use of these scatters in the determination of how land was used. Land use models require...
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Dying to Serve: The Mass Burials at Kerma
Introduction Kerma, the Bronze Age capital of the Kushite Kingdom in Upper Nubia (Sudan), was the site of the earliest African complex society outside of Egypt, and Egypt's adversary for control of the Nile trade. Kerma (the modern name of the site)...
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Editorial
In spite of its name, Antiquity is a modern business--a creature of today. Maybe our heart lies deep in the past, but our head is here and now. We aim to move with the times--or just ahead of them--making the past necessary, accessible and relevant....
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Engraved Art and Acoustic Resonance: Exploring Ritual and Sound in North-Western South Africa
Introduction There exists a vast corpus of literature dealing with the significance of the landscape in foraging societies and with studies concerning landscapes and rock art (e.g, Deacon 1988; Hardey & Wolley Vawser 2002; Ouzman 2002; Arsenault...
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Horticultural Experimentation in Northern Australia Reconsidered
Introduction In 1770, Joseph Banks portrayed Aborigines living along the Queensland coast as being 'ignorant of the arts of cultivation' (Beaglehole 1962: 123). Since that time, prehistorians working inside and outside Australia have persistently...
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Making a Point: Wood-Versus Stone-Tipped Projectiles
Introduction Wendell Oswalt's classic cross-cultural analysis of forager technology Habitat and technology: the evolution of hunting begins with the following dedication: 'To the maker of man--THE STICK' (1973). Recognising the importance of simple...
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New Book Chronicle
'Half hidden among the pile of papers is a bulky parcel containing five volumes which his editor has sent with a note suggesting that they 'ought to go well together.' They arrived four days ago, but for forty-eight hours the reviewer was prevented...
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Prehistoric Small Scale Monument Types in Hadramawt (Southern Arabia): Convergences in Ethnography, Linguistics and Archaeology
Introduction Between 1996 and 2008, the RASA Project has directed multi-disciplinary approaches to an understanding of the lives and landscapes of southern Yemen's highland (Jol) prehistoric inhabitants. Although the research has been fundamentally...
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Pre-Inca Mining in the Southern Nasca Region, Peru
Introduction Godoy (1985) has suggested that mining, as a process, is composed of three phases: exploration, development and production. Exploration is the most important and involves the search for and discovery of deposits used later in production...
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Private Pantries and Celebrated Surplus: Storing and Sharing Food at Neolithic Catalhoyuk, Central Anatolia
Introduction Food storage practice has often played a key role in accounts of early farming. In a seminal paper, Flannery (1972) identified household storage as the defining characteristic of early agricultural villages; through private storage,...
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Sculptors' Signatures on Iberian Stone Statues from Ipolca-Obulco (Porcuna, Jaen, Spain)
Introduction Iberian culture is defined as that which flourished from the sixth to the first centuries BC within the Iberian Peninsula. Its roots can be determined from at least the ninth century BC, when the local late Bronze Age population developed...
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Social Interaction and Rock Art Styles in the Atacama Desert (Northern Chile)
Introduction The Atacama Desert is located in the north of Chile and extends 600km from the Loa River to the Copiapo River (Figure 1). It is the driest desert in the world and large portions of it are void of life. However, the supply of fresh water...
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Stone Tool Experiments and Reduction Methods at the Acheulean Site of Isampur Quarry, India
Introduction Stone tool technology has been used to make inferences about various aspects of hominin cognition, ranging from symbolism (e.g. Carbonell et al. 2003) to spatial awareness (e.g. Wynn 2002). Stone tool reduction experiments are an important...
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Taking Microliths into Account
I thank Crombe et al. for their comment on an earlier paper (Vanmontfort 2008) and the editor of this journal for providing me with the opportunity to reply to their critique. They use two intensively surveyed and studied areas in the lower Scheldt...
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The Demonstration of Human Antiquity: Three Rediscovered Illustrations from the 1825 and 1846 Excavations in Kent's Cavern (Torquay, England)
Introduction Kent's Cavern, Torquay, England (NGR SX 934 642: Figure 1) is one of the most famous sites in the history of archaeology, principally for its early role in the advocacy of a deep human antiquity. Yet remarkably, and despite the fact...
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The Domitian II Coin from Chalgrove: A Gallic Emperor Returns to History
The Gallic Empire The year AD 260 saw arguably Rome's greatest military humiliation: the capture of Valerian, the senior reigning emperor, by the Sassanian Persian Empire. The repercussions stretched across the Roman world. The eastern campaign...
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The Early Management of Cattle (Bos Taurus) in Neolithic Central Anatolia
Introduction The domestication of cattle in the Near East approximately 10 000 years ago was an important innovation that helped transform the subsistence systems of agro-pastoral societies that, previously, had relied largely on herds of domestic...
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The Reburial Issue in Britain
Introduction The dead are back. Like a horde of irritating poltergeists the human remains of the ancients have returned to harass us in the form of the reburial issue; perennial source of postcolonial guilt and undergraduate seminar material. Only...
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