Antiquity

Antiquity is a quarterly journal that was founded in 1927. The publication issues peer-reviewed articles on world archaeology. Antiquity is published by Antiquity Publications, Ltd. It is owned by the Antiquity Trust. Headquarters is in York, United Kingdom. The journal is edited by Martin Carver, emeritus professor of archaeology at the University of York. It is also produced by members of the directors of the Antiquity Publications, Ltd., including Chris Evans, Roger Guthrie, Martin Millett, Nicky Milner, Cameron Petrie, Mike Pitts and Andrew Rogerson

Articles from Vol. 67, No. 257, December

Ancient Chinese Ritual Bronzes: The Evidence from Tombs and Hoards of the Shang (C. 1500-1050 BC) and Western Zhou (C. 1050-771 BC) Periods
The great cast bronzes of China are today deservedly celebrated for their splendour and sheer size. By looking behind that surface impression, and into the characters of their find-contexts, one can -- as for any class of artefact -- see behind what...
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A Social Prehistory of European Languages
Consistent to most views of Indo-European in later European prehistory is a genetic focus. The blanket of related languages across Europe marks an equal human spread -- whether of steppe warriors, Beaker burialists or slashing-and-burning farmers. What...
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Babylon Revisited: Archaeology and Philology in Harness
The recent publication of cuneiform texts relating to Babylon allows a reassessment of the city's topography, and sheds light on the remains discovered by Robert Koldewey and more recent excavators. A comparison of the archeological and documentary evidence...
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Bohemia from the Air: Seven Decades after Crawford
It is more than 70 years since O.G.S. Crawford, founder of ANTIQUITY, was given air photographs from southern England which led him to realize their potential for archaeology. Leo Deuel's book Flights into yesterday was translated into Czech in 1979,...
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British Sites and Their Roman Coins
An analysis of the Roman coins lost on different types of site within Roman Britain shows strong chronological and geographical trends, as well as providing a critique for the current classification of sites. Finds in Roman archaeology have a hierarchy....
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Chariot and Horse Burials in Ancient China
Later in this number of ANTIQUITY is a review, page 930, of our knowledge, direct and often indirect, about chariots and wagons in the Europe of 2000 years ago. How much greater is our knowledge in China, where sacrificial burials of vehicles with their...
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Editorial
On the last day but one of his 1873 season, Heinrich Schliemann found at Hissarlik, the mound in west Turkey he had identified as the Troy of Homeric tales, the gold hoard he called 'Priam's Treasure'. This is the jewellery which was worn by his wife...
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Infanticide in Roman Britain
Age-distributions of perinatal infants from Romano-British sites and a medieval site are different and may reflect different major causes of death. Whilst the medieval infants probably represent natural deaths, the Romano-British infants, from both cemetery...
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Late Glacial Prehistory of Central and Southern Portugal
Very little is known of the Upper Palaeolithic of Portugal, although it has been assumed to have the same general characteristics as elsewhere in southwestern Europe. New evidence suggests clear technological distinctions between Portugal and other areas...
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Middens and Cheniers: Implications of Australian Research
In watery places people prefer to live where they can keep their feet dry, and an elevation of a metre or two can make a difference. The simple distinction between humanly created middens and naturally built features does not easily apply in the Australian...
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New Radiocarbon Dates from Bougon and the Chronology of French Passage-Graves
New radiocarbon determinations from northwest France further contribute to the proposition -- 25 years old now -- that the megaliths of the region are astoundingly early in the west European Neolithic sequence. European archaeologists were considerably...
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On the Historiographical Orientation of Chinese Archaeology
This year, as it seems every year, news comes from China of another spectacular archaeological discovery. What is the framework of ideas and research that studies these treasures? And how does the special character of Chinese history, with its long,...
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Rock Art and Natal Drakensberg Hunter-Gatherer History: A Reply to Dowson
A further contribution on art, history and archaeological attitude in South Africa. Introduction Dowson (1993) takes issue with aspects of an article of mine, 'Changing fortunes: 150 years of San hunter-gatherer history in the Natal Drakensberg, South...
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Second Thoughts on a Rock-Art Date
D.E. Nelson, radiocarbon scientist in the group which reported early dates for rock-art at two Australian sites in ANTIQUITY 64 (1990), reports a further study which leads him to withdraw the published date for one, at Laurie Creek (Northern Territory)....
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Shell Beads from Mandu Mandu Creek Rock-Shelter, Cape Range Peninsula, Western Australia, Dated before 30,000 B.P
A site dated well back into the Pleistocene in Western Australia yields modified shells, seen as a further evidence of the attributes of modern humans from an early Australian context. Recent reviews (Mellars 1989; Marshack 1990) have highlighted the...
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The Berlin Wall: Production, Preservation and Consumption of a 20th-Century Monument
Books. HARTUNG, K. 1989. Der Fall der Mauer, Tageszeitung (6 November). HILDEBRANDT, R. 1988a. The Wall speaks/Die Mauer Spricht. Berlin: Haus am Checkpoint Charlie. 1988b. It happened at the Wall. Berlin: Haus am Checkpoint Charlie. 1993. Die Deutsche...
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The Celts in the North Pontic Area: A Reassessment
The recent great exhibition in Venice of Celtic art and artefacts showed once again the intriguing attraction of the Celtic traditions, so influential in our view of old Europe, both western and central. But what about the Celts in the east, and specifically...
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The Conservation of Chinese Historic Cities
The modernizing of China brings up once more the twin needs to sweep away that which is old and bad, and to hold on to that which is old and good. A report illustrates the particular issues and some outcomes. China, with such a long history, has many...
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'The End of Meroe' - a Comment on the Paper by Patrice Lenoble & Nigm El Din Mohammed Sharif
Issue is taken with the view offered in a 1992 ANTIQUITY paper of the later history of this Sudanese kingdom The paper 'Barbarians at the gates? the royal mounds of El Hobagi and the end of Meroe' (Lenoble & Sharif (1992) in ANTIQUITY 66: 626-34)...
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The Excavator: Creator or Destroyer?
Our special section on heritage in the June issue took the conventional current view that excavation is destruction. A more creative vision is offered. A generation ago Mortimer Wheeler articulated the basic principle that 'all excavation is destruction'....
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The Past Re-Made: The Case of Oriental Carpets
Old carpets, as informative material objects, are therefore the proper stuff of archaeology. Aspects of the carpet world offer food for thought as to how entities we recognize among the debris of antiquity come to be recognized and valued. Here James...
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