Antiquity

Antiquity is a quarterly journal that was founded in 1927. The publication issues peer-reviewed articles on world archaeology. Antiquity is published by Antiquity Publications, Ltd. It is owned by the Antiquity Trust. Headquarters is in York, United Kingdom. The journal is edited by Martin Carver, emeritus professor of archaeology at the University of York. It is also produced by members of the directors of the Antiquity Publications, Ltd., including Chris Evans, Roger Guthrie, Martin Millett, Nicky Milner, Cameron Petrie, Mike Pitts and Andrew Rogerson

Articles from Vol. 69, No. 265, Annual

Arboriculture and Agriculture in Coastal Papua New Guinea
A central issue in the regional prehistory over the Transition - and therefore of this whole set of papers - is the different life-ways that came to be followed in Papua New Guinea and in Australia itself; the one became agricultural, the other hunter-gatherer....
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Aridity and Settlement in Northwest Australia
An element in the changing pattern of Australian archaeology has been the filling-in of great blanks on the archoeological map, once survey and excavation has begun to explore them. The dry lands of the great central and western deserts of Australia,...
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Arnhem Land Prehistory in Landscape, Stone and Paint
Arnhem Land at the end of the Pleistocene Making sense of information about the human past is one of the primary goals of archaeological research. In western Arnhem Land we may obtain information from two very different but complimentary sources, shelter...
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Broad Spectrum Diets in Arid Australia
A characteristic feature of human subsistence as the last glaciation ended was the turn towards new food sources, in a `broad spectrum' transformation. Australia took an unusual course, and the trajectory in its arid zone is especially striking. What...
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Early Agriculture in New Guinea and the Torres Strait Divide
The high and low islands of Torres Strait, scattered between the tip of Queensland and the coast of Papua New Guinea, make a unique frontier in later world prehistory: between a continent of hunter-gatherers and the majority world of cultivators. Consideration...
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Environmental Change in Greater Australia
Australia, a dry island continent in mid latitude, spans from tropical to cold temperature regions; long isolation has given it its own flora and fauna. Environment changes in the late Quaternary have had their own and special courses in the continent...
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Human Reactions to the Pleistocene-Holocene Transition in Greater Australia: A Summary
Introducing the book, we began with the broad pattern of change in human behaviour associated with the end of the last glaciation. This pattern - the 'Archaic' of the New World, 'Mesolithic' of the Old - is often attributed to environmental change,...
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Late Quaternary Change in the Mountains of New Guinea
At the south and north limits of our region are mountainous areas very different from the open arid spaces of the Australion continent between. In the north, the high country of New Guinea offers a complex and well-studied environmental sequence as...
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Riverine, Biological and Cultural Evolution in Southeastern Australia
The rise of cemeteries, extreme biological diversification, size decrease, increased violence, disappearance of megafauna, exploitation of different resources, evolution of rivers to an expanded system of microenvironments, changes in occupation. How...
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Stone Artefacts and the Transition
Stone artefacts are made central in Australian prehistory by their dominance in the material we have from the field. Their contribution to this prehistory comes in the form of an unchanging tradition that spans the transition and changes only in the...
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Tasmania: Archaeological and Palaeo-Ecological Perspectives
Tasmania, at the south of the land-mass, experienced the Glacial Maximum as a properly cold affair. Recent archaeological work, some in country now difficult of human access, has developed an intricate story of changing adaptations. At the Pleistocene-Holocene...
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The Australian Transition: Real and Perceived Boundaries
The Pleistocene to Holocene transition is both a reality of climate history, and a notion of the prehistorian. A century of approaches to Australian archeology guides the frameworks of the issue today. Over the last 20 to 30 years several major...
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The Development of Sahul Agriculture with Australia as Bystander
The distribution of food-plants - both potential and actually exploited - reflects the natural history of contact across the seas and through the region, often long before Pleistocene times. The later and the human contribution has to be discerned...
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Themes in the Prehistory of Tropical Australia
The wetter tropical zones of northern Australia are linked by their monsoonal climates. Their archaeology shows its own distinctive pattern as well, and rock-art is an important source of evidence and insight. This study focusses on a part of Queensland,...
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The Transition on the Coastal Fringe of Greater Australia
Australia, with its wide continental shelves, is a difficult region for the study of coastal adaptations over the Transition, as so much land was drowned by the post-glacial sea level rise. What can be discerned has a place in a larger and longer-term...
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