E Magazine

A consumer magazine publishing news, information and commentary on environmental issues. Content includes international and domestic environmental news, feature articles, and a guide to green living. Addresses such subjects as recycling, food safety, air

Articles from Vol. 5, No. 6, December

Agrarian Nation: Can Iceland Become the First All-Organic Country?
From mid-May to mid-August, there is almost continuous daylight in Iceland, which gives the tiny (39,000 square miles) country a short but intense growing season. Iceland touches the Arctic Circle at its northern tip, and the cold limits the range of...
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Alaska's Old Growth Gamble: Will the Tongass National Forest Lose Its Wildlife in Clearcuts?
Some old-timers still remember the Pacific Northwest in its glory. They say the salmon were so numerous you could walk across their backs as they swam upstream to spawn every year. That was before the dams stopped the stream flows, and logging and cattle...
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Battle Stations
What Happens When A "Tree Hugger" Falls For A "Tree Hater?" "What's one more can of paint in the ocean? It's really big." "Why cut up those plastic six-pack rings? We can live without the animals that get caught in them." "You environmentalists are...
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Dating an Eco-Nazi
When I first met her, she warned me that she was an "Eco-Nazi," but when love is in the air, yon don't really pay much attention to those kinds of remarks. I figured, OK...environmentalism is cool. So I'll have to be more diligent about recycling cans...
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Eight for the Earth
E Magazine's Inductees Into The Kid Heroes Hall of Fame "Kids say the darndest things," chirped that premier talk show host Art Linkletter. Kids also do the darndest things, superbly shown by the eight kids you're about to meet. They've lectured delegates...
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Ford's Better Ideas
What happens to empty plastic soda bottles left out on the curb for recycling? Would you believe they're made into luggage racks and door padding for Fords? Auto companies are not known for their environmental leadership--compliance is more like it--but,...
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Goodness Guaranteed: The Federal Government Finally Puts the U.S. Seal of Approval on Organic Produce
Ten years ago, you had to be a true believer to buy organic produce. It was expensive, and it looked awful--small, shriveled and covered with the bruises and holes wrought by unsprayed bugs. But that was then, and organic produce has come a long way...
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Gus the Neurotic Bear
During the dog days of last summer, when the New York City tabloids needed a breather from O.J. Simpson, Newsday discovered Gus the Neurotic Bear. He wasn't hard to find. A 700-pound polar bear, he lives in the Central Park Zoo, sharing a large slate-gray...
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Last Refuge for Whooping Cranes
Quiet, dusty Rockport, Texas is a shrimping and sport fishing center, a vacation destination for "winter Texans" from the midwest, and one of the only places in the world to see the endangered whooping crane, the largest bird in North America. Whooping...
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Love Canal Lives
After a Major Cleanup and Financial Settlement, People Filter Back The tree-lined streets have an eerie quietness. The neighborhood, with its orderly rows of World War II-era homes, looks as though there should be activity, but there is none. The grass...
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Medical Horse Stories
Sometimes medicine isn't as glamorous as it sounds. Take Premarin, the leading estrogen replacement drug prescribed to about eight million women to prevent the "hot flashes" of menopause or the "dowager's hump" of osteoporosis in old age. Wyeth-Ayerst...
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Pete Seeger: Folk Music's Granddad Plays It Green
Pete Seeger, one of the world's best-known folk-singers and social activists, comes from a long line of troublemakers. Civil War Seegers were abolitionists. Pete's music professor father became a socialist and a World War I conscientious objector, giving...
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Philly Is Pig Friendly
After every meal she and her family eat at home, Philadelphian Happy Fernandez dumps food scraps into a big plastic bag she keeps in her refrigerator. Then on Sunday and Wednesday nights, she puts the accumulated waste into a bucket and sets it out curbside....
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Recycling the Bronx
Yolanda Rivera parks her rusty two-toned Cadillac Seville on the cracked concrete driveway at the site of her future factory in New York City's South Bronx. She may not be your typical capitalist entrepreneur, but then the Bronx is not your typical industrial...
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The Mercury among Us: New Jersey Neighborhoods Fight Toxic Incinerators
Anne Parker, a retired school teacher, lives in what should be a pleasant middle-class neighborhood in Rahway, New Jersey. The curbs hold orange jack-o-lantern leaf bags, the sidewalks have cracked from the roots of stately sycamore trees, the brick...
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Theme World U.S.A
Americans love amusement parks. New ones are coming, from Wayne's World in the Florida Everglades to Trump Park in Connecticut. Just how much of the natural world should we trade for fantasylands? The story of theme parks and the environment may best...
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