E Magazine

A consumer magazine publishing news, information and commentary on environmental issues. Content includes international and domestic environmental news, feature articles, and a guide to green living. Addresses such subjects as recycling, food safety, air

Articles from Vol. 13, No. 6, November-December

A Breath of Fresh Air: Home Ventilation Made Simple. (House & Home)
On a blistering cold day, with the house tightly sealed and the heating cranked up, the air at home may pose more of a threat to human health than smoggy urban air. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) studies indicate that indoor levels of...
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China Tailpipe Tally: The World's Biggest Nation "Modernizes" with More Cars. (Currents)
The tale of China's modernization is being told along its winding dirt trails, the paved gray roads in its cities and, more recently, its ambitious network of highways. In rural Hainan, farmers still pedal to their paddy fields before dawn, bumping...
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Good Grazing? Advocates Say Free-Range Cattle Can Have Environmental Benefits. (Currents)
In 1995, when Richard Sechrist took over the Texas ranch his family had owned since 1947, it looked like much of the grazed land in the West: barren. Generations of cattle had been allowed to roam freely over the 1,100-acre ranch, trampling pastures...
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John Grim: Transforming Religions. (Conversations)
Like his wife, Mary Evelyn Tucker, John Grim teaches in the religion department at Bucknell University. As a historian of religions, he has conducted considerable fieldwork on Native American "lifeways" and is the author of The Shaman: Patterns...
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Juicing the Waste Stream: Aseptic Packages Are Convenient, but Hard to Recycle. (Consumer News)
If there's juice in your child's school backpack, it's more than likely that it's stored in a paper-and-foil aseptic package, complete with a colorful cartoon logo. Although aseptic packaging was invented to safely ship foods without refrigeration--a...
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Mad about Madagascar: Mesmerized by a Mini-Continent. (Going Green)
Along the road in rural Madagascar, giant baobab trees sit like vegetable elephants and malnourished children dance in hopes that travelers will toss them money. Our van, lurching over the rutted Malagasy National Highway, had long passed the last...
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Our Daily Bread: Going with the Grain for Good Health. (Eating Right)
When I was growing up in the 1960s, I thought the breads my grandparents served--dark, coarse pumpernickels and ryes "to sop up the sauces"--were peasant food, the last vestiges of their hard lives in Russia. Like most American children of my generation,...
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Paul Gorman: Making Spiritual Connections. (Conversations)
Paul Gorman has been a communicator all his life, so it's not surprising that his work since 1993 as the executive director of the National Religious Partnership for the Environment (NRPE) involves networking among major Christian and Jewish denominations....
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Poisoning Frogs: Are People Next?
Despite new findings by the University of California, Berkeley, which link the pesticide atrazine to sexual mutations in flogs, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is considering a three- to four-fold increase for atrazine standards in drinking...
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Putting Pension Plans to Work: Retirement Billions Can Be Harnessed to Green the Economy. (Money Matters)
The headlines are full of corporate scandals involving Enron, WorldCom, Xerox and even Martha Stewart Omnimedia, with the result that big business is under scrutiny as never before. In an effort to improve companies' social and environmental practices...
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Rich vs. Poor: Not Much Sustainability at the World Summit. (Currents)
South Africa is a country of fabulous wealth and grinding poverty, but few delegates to the World Summit on Sustainable Development held in Johannesburg, South Africa August 26 through September 4 saw much more of the city than the malls and banking...
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Save the Earth, Not Just Souls. (E Word)
As a kid I was forced to go to Sunday school, where the second half of the hour has sometimes spent in church itself. My friends and I delighted in sitting in the balcony and making up our own silly words as we sang along to hymns like "Go Down...
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Stewards of the Earth: The Growing Religious Mission to Protect the Environment
When conservative evangelical Christians call for action on global warming, Hindu holy men dedicate themselves to saving sacred rivers and Buddhist monks work with Islamic mullahs to try to halt the extinction crisis, boundaries are clearly being...
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Stranded in the Suburbs
At Connecticut's Weston High School, in a small town where cars rule and pedestrians are in danger, the most important rite of passage is getting a driver's license. "Having wheels" in Weston, as in many other suburban towns, means freedom from...
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The Ford Foundation's Accolades for Activists
Working with the low-income, primarily Latino population of East Austin, Texas, Susana Almanza and Sylvia Herrera of People Organized in Defense of Earth and her Resources led a successful fight to shut down a chemical tank farm and move a rodent-infested...
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Veggie Athletes, Sinful Salmon and Sprayed Insulation. (Ask E)
Are any professional athletes vegetarians?--Scott Israel, Arlington, TX Billie Jean King, who racked up 20 wins at Wimbledon, won he U.S. Open 13 times and dealt a blow to male chauvinism when she beat Bobby Riggs in a 1973 tennis match, was...
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Weird Science
The Mapimi Biosphere Reserve is a loosely defined 425,000-acre expanse of land in the center of Mexico's Chihuahua Desert. It's home to at least 300 vascular plants, 30 types of cacti and 249 vertebrate species, including mountain lions, bobcats...
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Worldly Wonder: Religions Enter an Ecological Phase
Over the past century, science has begun to weave together the story of a historical cosmos that emerged some 12 billion years ago. The magnitude of this universe story is beginning to dawn on us, as we awaken to a new realization of its vastness...
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World War Tree. (Currents)
A tree grows in Brooklyn, New York, and federal inspectors were swarming all over it looking for the Asian longhorned beetle--a sort of vampire cockroach that punctures the arteries of hardwood trees. The beetle reportedly arrived in Brooklyn...
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Zap! the Growing Controversy over Food Irradiation. (Your Health)
Over the past several years, a series of highly publicized recalls have sent panicky consumers running to the fridge to check for tainted meat. In 1998, Sara Lee recalled millions of pounds of hot dogs and deli meat after 21 people died in a Listeria...
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