Geographical

The monthly magazine of the Royal Geographical Society with the Institute of British Geographers. Covers a broad range of subjects related to geography in articles on people, places, cultures, adventure, responsible travel, history, science, and the envir

Articles from Vol. 83, No. 5, May

A Sense of Place: Tim Radford, Author of the Address Book: Our Place in the Scheme of Things, Considers How-Ever since the Ancient Greeks Began Pondering, Studying and Measuring Our World-Geography Has Been Central to Millennia of Intellectual Advances, Helping Us to Answer Some Eternal Conundrums: Who Am I? Why Am I Here? Where Am I Going?
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] When Eratosthenes of Alexandria stood in the noonday sun at Syene, near the Tropic of Cancer, on the day of the summer solstice in 240 BC and (so the pared-down version of the story goes) observed no shadow, he made one of...
Christmas Island
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] In March, the Australian territory of Christmas Island witnessed rioting as asylum seekers burned , their detention centre and attacked security guards. About 2S0 inmates were involved, and the Australian authorities dispatched...
From River to Road
There's only one road into the Himalayan kingdom of Zanskar--home to approximately 13,000 people--and it's only navigable four months a year. For the people who live in this remote community, there are just two options to reach the outside world during...
Green Canary: The Second Largest of the Canary Islands, Fuerteventura Is One of the Least Developed for Mass Tourism-And the Locals Want It to Stay That Way. Their Efforts to Develop a Sustainable Tourism Industry on the Island Have Been Recognised by UNESCO, Which Made It a Biosphere Reserve, and Now, Adventurous Visitors Can Sample Its Wonders Via a Newly Opened Long-Distance Walking Track. Nick Haslam Hits the Trail
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Por Donde vas Fuerteventura, with its refrain 'Where are you going, with your lorries of cement', popular on the island during the 1970s, bemoaned the sudden upsurge of building on the last of the Canary Islands to be developed...
Life in a Danger Zone
It hasn't really been a conscious decision, but I've always lived in relatively tectonically stable places. Consequently, I've never experienced a powerful earthquake--the closest I've come is a small tremor while visiting a friend in Tokyo. Would...
Perfect Timing
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Last year's Travel Photographer of the Year award received thousands of entries from scores of countries around the world. To coincide with the launch of an exhibition of the winning images at the Royal Geographical Society...
Tackling the TGO Challenge: Every May, a Group of Backpackers Set off on a Coast-to-Coast Trek across Scotland, Battling through the Whole Gamut of Highland Weather Conditions. Here, Phil Turner Describes the Ultralight Gear That Helped Him to Complete the Hike from West to East
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] In my opinion, wilderness coffee tastes finest when consumed from a wooden vessel, so although it's a contradiction of my ultralight backpacking philosophy, my heavy Finnish birch kuksa is almost always found clipped to my...
Ten of the Best
As an ultralight backpacker, Phil works on the principle that less is more. So while taking part in the TGO Challenge, he made sure to pack kit that was lightweight, suitable for all weathers, and, wherever possible, had more than one use. Here is...
The End of the Census? in the UK, Census Have Been Carried out Every Decade since 1801, Providing a Valuable Snapshot of British Society. but Could This Year's Census Be the Last?
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] British people have never been keen on censuses. During the late 19th century, thousands of Britons spent census night sitting in railway stations in order to avoid being counted. And when the first detailed census took place...
The Road North: More Migrants Head North for the USA from Chiapas, Mexico's Southernmost and Most Impoverished State, Than from Anywhere Else in the Country. Trevor Bach Explores the Reasons Why and Examines the Impact That This Economic Exodus Is Having on Chiapanecan Society
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Three months ago, 15-year-old Romeo Diaz de la Cruz lost a friend. He died somewhere where in the Sonoran Desert, trying to walk into a new country and a new life. 'The water ran out,' says Diaz de la Cruz, his tone as...
The Search for Answers: The Earthquake That Struck Japan at 2.46pm on 11 March Was the Worst in the Country's History, Triggering a Devastating Tsunami and an Ongoing Nuclear Crisis. Mark Rowe Uncovers the Reasons Why the Quake Was So Destructive and Looks at the Lessons Being Learned by Scientists Studying the First Earthquake of Such Strength to Hit a Fully Developed Nation in Recorded History
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] The appalling cost in human lives from the 9.0-magnitude earthquake that struck 130 kilometres off the northeast coast of Japan on 11 March may never be precisely known....
Tim Flannery
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Tim Flannery is an Australian scientist and environmentalist; his work as a mammalogist and palaeontologist pushed Australia's mammal fossil record back 80 million years and uncovered numerous new extant species. His new book,...
Top Ten Writer's Reads
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] John Gimlette is a British travel writer. His latest book, Wild Coast: Travels on South America's Untamed Edge, about his three-month journey through Guyana, Suriname and French Guiana, is out now 1. LOVE AND WAR IN THE...
Virgin Holidays Responsible Tourism Awards 2011: Your Chance to Vote for the Shining Stars and Most Inspiring Stories of Responsible Tourism in 2011
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] The eighth Virgin Holidays Responsible Tourism Awards, founded and organised by responsibletravel.com, have just launched and are looking to travellers to nominate the shining stars of responsible tourism. Founded in 2004,...
Winds of Change: In the Past Decade, Wind Farms Have Become Fixtures across Britain's Countryside, Providing the Nation with Renewable Energy-And Polarising Opinion, with Opponents Viewing Turbines as Eyesores and Doubting Their Green Credentials. but These Tall, Slender Sentinels Are Here to Stay, and Can Provide an Interesting Centrepiece to Your Landscape Photography
The earthquake and tsunami that devastated northeastern Japan in March may yet prove to be the catalyst for change that spurs the world into pursuing a future powered by renewable energy. The radiation leakage from the stricken Fukishima nuclear power...