Geographical

The monthly magazine of the Royal Geographical Society with the Institute of British Geographers. Covers a broad range of subjects related to geography in articles on people, places, cultures, adventure, responsible travel, history, science, and the envir

Articles from Vol. 77, No. 5, May

A Journey beyond the Coral Sea: Few Regions Are as Little Known or as Poorly Understood as Papua New Guinea. over the Past 20 Years, Author Michael Moran Has Travelled among the Country's Island Provinces in the Hope of Gaining an Understanding of a People Whose Cultural Identity Is a Curious Mix of the Ancient and the Modern
There is a sad truism about the South Pacific that if Captain Cook failed to make an extended visit to an island, it will be virtually absent from the historical record. The Endeavour merely touched the southern coast of New Guinea when "hideous opposition"...
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Altitude Sickness: Medical Advice from Jason Gibbs, Head Pharmacist at Nomad Travel Stores and Health Clinics
There are several illnesses associated with high altitude, the most common of which is Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS), which occurs above 2,400 metres and is characterised by shortness of breath, headache, dizziness and drowsiness. Anyone can suffer...
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A Symphony in Stone: Utah Boasts Some of the Western USA's Most Spectacular Landscapes. Jo Sargent Explores the State's National Parks and Discovers That the Path Less Trodden Is Sometimes Best Left That Way
Gazing out over Utah's Bryce Canyon can be a dizzying experience. Hundreds of red spires sprawl out across the horizon under a brilliant blue sky. From above, this sea of twisted sandstone towers appears impenetrable, but a winding path leads down...
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Barry Roberts, a Former Director of Raleigh International, Is the Commercial Director of Wilderness Medical Training (WMT), Which Teaches Advanced Medical Skills for Use in Remote Areas
How did you and your partner, Dr Jon Dallimore, meet and why did you decide to set up WMT? Jon and I met on Mount Kenya on a Raleigh International expedition in 1988. We hit it off, and he nurtured my interest in expedition medicine for a few years...
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Beyond Our Grasp? the Great Apes Are Disappearing So Quickly That Some Species Face Possible Extinction within Ten Years. the Situation Is So Dire That the UN Will Host a Conference Later This Year with the Aim of Generating International Support for Their Protection. Charlie Furniss Asks Why It Has Got So Bad and What We Can Do to Stop the Decline
Travelling up the Lamandau River in southwestern Kalimantan, Indonesia, I discovered the kind of steamy jungle paradise I used to dream about as a child. The river itself is a calm, narrow waterway that gently winds through peat swamp, its water the...
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Cartography of Convenience: Hand-Map of a Portion of the Interior of Spitsbergen, Svalbard (1897)
At first sight, this map appears to be typical of those that regularly appeared in illustrated articles in the RGS's Journal or Proceedings between the 1830s and 1970s. However, above the map's top border appear the words 'Royal Geographical Society',...
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Chauncy D Harris (1914-2003) a Pioneer in the Emerging Field of Urban Geography, Chauncy Harris Was Also One of the Leading Experts on the Geography of the Post-War Soviet Union
What was Harris's background? Chauncy Harris was born in Logan, Utah, to Estella and Franklin Stewart Harris, His father, a research scientist at Utah State University, actively encouraged his son's interest in geography, to the extent that Harris...
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Getting to Know the Colonel
Colonel John Blashford-Snell's numerous expeditions were among the most impressive of the last century. Now in his 69th year, he still possesses a boundless energy. Christian Amodeo meets the founder of the Scientific Exploration Society and discovers...
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Grants Forum 2005: Researching the World
Every year, grants from the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) help geographers at every stage in their careers to conduct projects all over the world, supporting geographical research, fieldwork and teaching. Last year was no exception: grants...
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Quizzical: Chris Edwards Reveals the Mystery of Shangri-La, Why Siberia and the Aral Sea Have Both Shrunk, Why the Skeleton Coast Is So Called and Why Trains in the Southeast of England Use Electrified Rails Rather Than Cables
What constitutes Siberia? F Ali, Bradford Historically, Siberia covered up to three quarters of the land area of the Russian Federation. But its modern, administrative definition has reduced its size significantly. During the 19th century,...
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Reconciliation and Conservation in the Cardamoms: Cambodia's Cardamom Mountains Were Once a Refuge to the Khmer Rouge. Now, as Cambodia Begins to Address the Horrors of Its Recent Past and NGOs Struggle to Combat Illegal Logging, a Conservation Initiative Is Turning Former Soldiers into Guardians of This Little-Known Treasure
The ranger station at Pramaoy in southwestern Cambodia has all the trappings of a colonial hunting lodge. A bullet-holed elephant skull looms above a tangle of radio equipment, and several rifles lean against a woven rattan chair. One wall carries...
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Renewable Energy
Few people now dispute that climate change caused by human activity is a reality. In March this year, the American Association for the Advancement of Science was presented with 'conclusive' evidence that climate change is a result of anthropogenic...
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Robert Winston Is a Leader in the Field of Human Fertility Research and the Presenter of Several TV Programmes, Including Human Mind and Child of Our Time. He Also Acted as Editorial Consultant on Human, Dorling Kindersley's Definitive Visual Guide to Our Species, Released Earlier This Year
How did you get involved in Human? It's an area that I suppose is appropriate for me because of my broad interest in human biology, and I think the fact that it examines anthropology is very interesting. To put our humanity in a broader context...
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Sleeping Bags
essential gear No matter what nature throws at you during the day, all can be made better by a warm night in a dry sleeping bag. Paul Deegan offers some advice on how to get the ultimate night's sleep. On my first winter camping trip at the age...
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Socotra's Road to Ruin: Isolated for Millions of Years, the Islands of the Socotra Archipelago in the Arabian Sea Are Home to an Unusual Collection of Species Found Nowhere Else. but Now a Programme to Develop the Infrastructure of the Main Island Is Threatening Its Unique Ecosystems
Emerging from the Arabian Sea off the Arabian Peninsula, the Socotra archipelago is like some sort of Middle Eastern Galapagos. A remnant of an ancient landmass, it has been tectonically isolated from Africa and Arabia for the past 18 million years....
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Taking Action on the World's Water Issues
Last month marked the beginning of the 'water decade'. This unique initiative is aimed at highlighting the magnitude of global water issues in the hope that stakeholder groups will combine forces and deliver solutions that actually bring about change....
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Thailand: One Worker's Story
For countless hotel workers in the popular Thai tourist destinations of Phuket and Khao Lak, lives, homes and families have been devastated not only by the tsunami, but also by the unfair and exploitative treatment they receive from the hotels. Many...
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Tornadoes: Raw Power
What is a tornado? Tornadoes are nature's most violent storms. Appearing as rotating, funnel-shaped clouds, they have a column of rapidly moving air that reaches the ground. Within this column, strong winds are drawn into the funnel, and thence...
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