Geographical

The monthly magazine of the Royal Geographical Society with the Institute of British Geographers. Covers a broad range of subjects related to geography in articles on people, places, cultures, adventure, responsible travel, history, science, and the envir

Articles from Vol. 78, No. 10, October

A Selection of October's Other Society Events
For details, please contact the Events Office on 020 7591 3100 6 October, 8pm 17 October, 8pm Forecasting and our changing weather (LECTURES, BRECON AND SOUTHAMPTON) As part of the Regional Theatres Programme, BBC weather presenter Helen Young...
Building on the Past, Gambling on the Future
The former Portuguese colony of Macau represents one of the first and most enduring encounters between China and Europe. Today, however, it's best known as the gambling capital of the East. With construction of a massive new casino development following...
Enduring Qualities
The Antarctic is still the world's great nautical unknown, with many charts ominously annotated with the words 'inadequate surveys.' At the forefront of attempts to rectify this situation is the Royal Navy icebreaker HMS Endurance, which spends seven...
Hit the Heights: Essential Gear: Geographical's Own Everest Summiteer Paul Deegan Offers Some Tips on Everything You Need to Survive on the Death Zone
Most people think that mountaineering on 8,000-metre Peaks such as Mount Everest is all about surviving deep-cold temperatures. But for much of the time, heat is the climber's main enemy. And the hottest place on Everest is me notorious Khumbu Icefall....
How Green Is Your Business
With governments slow to act on neutralising the threat of warming, large corporations are taking the lead in efforts to save the planet. But they're not just doing it out of the goodness of their hearts nor, necessarily, for the good press they receive....
Jo Sargent in Conversation With
Frans Lanting is a wildlife photographer whose work has appeared in books, magazines and exhibitions all over the world. Life, his latest project, is a multi-media venture that explores the history of life on Earth. It takes the form of a book, a musical...
Navigating the Natural World: Charles Darwin's Pocket Sextant
Born in 1809, Charles Robert Darwin fascinated by science from an early age, even creating a makeshift chemistry lab in the family's garden shed. But despite such early promise, he wasn't a particularly gifted scholar and his father, concerned by Darwin's...
Old New York
Founded in 1625 by a handful of Dutch settlers, New York City has gone on to fulfil several different roles--it served as the original seat of the US government, is the home of the nation's financial markets, has been a gateway to the USA for millions...
Safari Sensation: Home of the True African Safari, Kenya Is Re-Inventing Itself for a New Generation, Opening Up Its Superb Countryside to a Lighter Form of Tourism: Offering Private, Culturally Aware and Adventurous Safari Options
Kenya has long been internationally famous for its wildlife. The lions of the Mara and the elephant of Amboseli being frequent stars of TV dramas and best-selling novels. Yet in other ways this gem of East Africa is almost undiscovered. With the...
Secrets of the Death Jars
Described by UNESCO as "one of the most intriguing and enduring puzzles of Southeast Asian prehistory", the Plain of Jars in Laos has long defied archaeologists' attempts to explain its origins and significance. With World Heritage listing on the cards...
Sinking the Arc: Fourteen Years after the Rio Earth Summit, Brazil Continues to Lose an Area of Rainforest the Size of Wales Every Year. Fauna & Flora International's Regional Director for the Americas Evan Bowen-Jones Visits a Strategically Placed Reserve That Will Hopefully Help to Stop the Northward Progress of the 'Arc of Deforestation' Threatening the Heart of the Amazon
It was the biggest snake I'd ever seen: eight metres of sinuous muscle resting in the clear waters of the Cristalino River. Anacondas of such size are usually only found in more remote parts of the Amazon as the snakes tend to be killed by local people....
Skin Conditions II: Parasites: Medical Advice from Jason Gibbs, Head Pharmacist at Nomad Travel Stores and Health Clinics
There are numerous different types of skin condition and many different causes. Here we look at common infections caused by parasites. Creeping eruption: Otherwise known as cutaneous larvae migrans, creeping eruption is caused by a type of hookworm...
Ten of the Best: The Last Thing You Want to Do When Preparing for an Ascent of an 8,000-Metre Peak Is to Compromise on Your Gear. So Make Sure You Consult Our Regular Round-Up of the Best on Offer before You Buy
[1] Down suit PHD Xero Down Suit 500 [pounds sterling]/1.7 kilograms Designed by the man who produced the legendary Annapurna duvet jacket, the wind--and snowproof Xero sports the same box wall construction found in top flight sleeping bags....
The Dunes of the Badain Jaran: Located in the Heart of the Otherwise Sandless Gobi Desert, the Badain Jaran Is Home to the World's Tallest Sand Dunes. Always Looking for a New Extreme to Experience, Nick Middleton Set out to Find and Climb One of These So-Called Megadunes
We climbed onto the flat roof of the house to survey our options. The nearest peak soared straight up from the depression, its towering slipface oriented towards the southeast. On the other side of the basin, which was perhaps a kilometre across, two...
The Energy Challenge: A One-Day Forum
In July, the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) responded to growing concerns about how the UK is going to meet its future energy needs by publishing an energy review. 'The Energy Challenge' contained a number of proposals designed to create a...
The History of a Miracle
As far as we know, the Earth is the only planet in the universe upon which life has evolved. The history of its miraculous origin and diversification is told in the fossil record, but it's also all around us in the organisms that exist today. Although...
Time after Time: Geophoto: If You're Heading out after Dark in Search of Some Unusual and Evocative Shots, Just Open Up Your Shutter and Leave It That Way
The early days of photography weren't notable for their speed. Light-sensitive emulsions were slow, shutter speeds were slow and no photograph could be made without a rock steady tripod. Looking at photographs from the 19th century and the early part...
Top 10 Writer's Reads
1. Chronicle of the Guayaki Indians by Pierre Clastres (Faber and Faber, 9.99 [pounds sterling]) A sympathetic and intelligent depiction of a forest people; a superb counterbalance to the anthro trash currently so popular on TV 2. The Marsh Arabs...