Geographical

The monthly magazine of the Royal Geographical Society with the Institute of British Geographers. Covers a broad range of subjects related to geography in articles on people, places, cultures, adventure, responsible travel, history, science, and the envir

Articles from Vol. 81, No. 7, July

Adding Value
It's a sad reality that when it comes to environmentalism, it's the economic arguments that generally prove to be the most persuasive, the economic initiatives that often prove to be the most effective. It was the economics of climate change outlined...
Adventure Bound: The Search for New and Exciting Travel Opportunities-Not to Mention Good Dinner Party Stories-Has Led to a Rise in the Popularity of Truly Adventurous Holidays. Minty Clinch Joins a Challenging Horse Trek through the High Pamirs of Tajikistan to See What All the Fuss Is About
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Riding in the High Pamirs. Four weeks in the wilderness in Tajikistan and Afghanistan. Communal tent or sleeping outdoors at altitudes above 4,500 metres. Twelve-hour days on horseback in boulder-strewn uplands. Itinerary...
Dr Alexander Kellas's Camera: Used during the First Official Expedition to Mount Everest in 1921
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] At nearly 53, Alexander Kellas was considered by some to be too old to take part in a bid to climb Mount Everest, but he was asked to join the first official expedition in 1921 because nobody knew more about altitude sickness...
Escape to the Country: The Perennial Rural British Issue of Urban Incomers and Second-Home Owners Dominating the Countryside Is Being Addressed by a New and, for Many Stakeholders, Satisfactory Solution
They're the bane of rural communities, descending on sleepy villages and using their inflated urban incomes to snap up quaint cottages. They bring their own food, keep to themselves and then flit off back to the Big Smoke, leaving behind nothing but...
Guinea-Bissau
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] In March, soldiers assassinated Guinea-Bissau's president, Joao Bernardo Vieira, apparently in retaliation for the death of the army chief of staff, who was killed in an explosion a few hours earlier. Whether the president...
Have Children, Will Travel: It's Increasingly Common for Travellers to Venture off the Beaten Tourist Track with Young Children in Tow. Dr Jane Wilson-Howarth Explains What Families Should Pack to Keep Their Little 'Uns Safe, Healthy and Occupied When Travelling Independently
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] We first ventured overseas as a family when our first-born was three months old. After the long flight, we checked into a palatial hotel in Karachi and were greeted with free warm samosas and thick mango juice bobbing with...
Hedgerow Havens: Symbols of Both the British Countryside and, Latterly, Its Desecration, Hedgerows Have Long Offered a Refuge for Wildlife Displaced from Felled Forests. and, as Such, They Represent a Rich Hunting Ground for Photographers
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Over thousands of years, Britain's landscape has become one of the most cultivated in Europe, as ever-expanding settlements cleared the once vast forests to grow crops and raise livestock. Prior to the Industrial Revolution,...
Monday Night Lectures of 2008-09
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] With the short 'summer break' now upon us, what better time to look back over the range of speakers and topics covered in the past year's Monday night lectures. The autumn series kicked off in September last year with a...
Moving Forwards from the SGM: Following on from the Vote at the Recent Special General Meeting of the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), Society Director Dr Rita Gardner Looks to the Future
* A NUMBER OF FELLOWS have asked what is going to happen after the special general meeting (SGM). 'Will the Society continue with its planned review of how it supports research and scientific expeditions?' The answer is 'yes'. Further information on...
No Business like Shoe Business: The Footwear Industry Is Symptomatic of Our Addiction to 'Fast Fashion', Churning out Cheap, Throwaway Shoes from Sweatshops, and Its Manufacturing Practices-Such as Leather Tanning-Are Harmful to the Environment. It's an Ethical Minefield
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] During the 1980s, shoes lost their workaday reputation and became a sort of super-currency--women (and men) could be judged by their collection of footwear. Shoes by Manolo Blahnik, Jimmy Choo and Christian Louboutin--all...
Spiritual Healing
Witchdoctor, shaman, healer, medicine man--whatever their title, they are often the focal point of indigenous cultures worldwide, using their wisdom, knowledge of natural remedies, magical powers and ability to communicate with the gods and spirits...
Ten of the Best
Having young children is difficult enough for many parents, and taking them abroad, far away from the comforts of home, can only add to the burden. Here are some items that will come in handy on the road, making trips to exotic lands enjoyable and...
That Moment: The Winner of the Water Category Is Catherine Lax of Newcastle upon Tyne
A glowing memory [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] I was a sailor: I had seen dolphins before, all over the world. But it's always a thrill when one pops up and swims alongside, and it never fails to raise a gasp from a first-timer. We were about 2,400...
The Best Protection: For Many Years, Brazil's Rubber Tappers Were at Loggerheads with Ranchers Who Wanted to Clear the Rainforest-A Standoff That, in One Infamous Case, Led to Murder. but Now, a Government-Backed Scheme to Make Latex Condoms in the Heart of the Amazon Is Helping to Both Preserve the Rubber Tappers' Livelihoods and Promote a Love for the Forest
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Having sex might seem an unlikely way of saving the rainforest, but if you use a Brazil-made condom, you may be doing exactly that. In April last year, a condom factory opened in the Amazon that will...
The Devil's Water: The Introduction of Tube Wells to the Indian Subcontinent Was Supposed to Bring about a Public Health Revolution; Instead, It Has Created a Crisis of Unprecedented Proportions. in What Has Been Described as the Worst Mass Poisoning of Humans in History, as Many as 500 Million People Have Been Exposed to Arsenic-Contaminated Water
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] When water flowed from one of the first tube wells installed in India, a local villager was heard to say: 'The Devil's water is coming'. Little did they know how right they were. For generations,...
The Sperrins: Stretching from the Strule Valley in the West to Lough Neagh in the East, the Sperrins AONB in Northern Ireland Encompasses a Glaciated Mountainous Landscape That's Steeped in History and Contains a Large Proportion of the UK's Internationally Important Blanket Bog
'You're probably the first tourist to climb Mullaghmore,' says my companion as we reach the summit. 'We certainly don't get many of you up this way.' It's a perfect day to enjoy this wild, desolate landscape: sunny and clear with a cool breeze. Far...
Top Ten Writer's Reads
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Conor Woodman was a market analyst in London before he sold his flat and set out to buy and sell goods around the world. The book about his adventures, Around the World in 80 Trades, is out now 1. ROUND IRELAND WITH A FRIDGE...
Toxic Technology
Our quest to own the latest electronic gadgetry is driving a growing trade in e-waste. Of the 20-50 million tonnes disposed of each year, almost three quarters will end up in poor nations such as Ghana. At Agbogbloshie dump in Accra, the nation's main...
Tristan Gooley
Tristan Gooley, 36, non-executive vice chairman of Trailfinders and the only living person to have crossed the Atlantic Ocean solo by both plane and boat, has just established the world's first school of natural navigation--on the South Downs. He tells...