Geographical

The monthly magazine of the Royal Geographical Society with the Institute of British Geographers. Covers a broad range of subjects related to geography in articles on people, places, cultures, adventure, responsible travel, history, science, and the envir

Articles from Vol. 72, No. 8, August

A Fundamental Problem
For the past eight years bitter conflict between Islamic extremists and the ruling military regime has ripped Algeria apart. It is estimated that over 100,000 people have died since the fighting began. THEY CALL IT LA VILLE BLANCHE -- The White...
Aids
The full treatment From a 30 per cent infection rate, the Ugandan capital of Kampala's HIV incidence has been reduced to 12 per cent over the last ten years. Jack Barker looks into one of the pioneering projects that helped turn the tide HIGH...
At Work: ASTRONOMER
Holly Smith talks to Robert Massey about working at the Royal Observatory Occupation: Astronomy Information Officer Age: 30 Salary: 19,000 [pounds sterling], plus bonuses and commission What does your job involve on a day-to-day basis?...
Best Foot Forward
Walker Andrew Terrill starts the first leg of his journey along the entire length of the Rocky Mountains to raise money for the homeless PERHAPS IT'S THE COMPLETE disorganisation which appeals most, the fact that I never really know quite what lies...
Chances of a Lifetime
Have you an unfulfilled life-long ambition? A burning desire to do something out of the ordinary? Well, help could be at hand. John Warburton-Lee explains how IN 1997 I SPENT three months travelling in Canada's Yukon Territories and across Alaska...
Deep Secrets
Underwater archaeologist, Franck Goddio uncovers the wreck of The Royal Captain more than two centuries after it sunk in the Philippines On 17 December, 1773, three days out of the Chinese port of Canton, the British ship, The Royal Captain set...
Editor's Letter
There will be lots of exciting new additions and changes to Geographical in the months ahead. Over the next six months I will be off on a journey of a different kind, taking maternity leave, and I am pleased to hand over the job of editor to Carolyn...
Fuelling the Fire
To halt the havoc that flying and shipping are inflicting on our environment, action must be based on what the planet needs, not what business and the consumer want, argues Jon Reeds It's almost three years since the world's leaders gathered in...
Hot Spots
Tom Hooper, acting team leader of the Shoals of Capricorn programme in Rodrigues, sends a postcard home When we first set up the Shoals of Capricorn base on the island of Rodrigues we knew we would be involved in training, scientific research and...
How to Become an Old Fossil
Becoming preserved in stone for posterity is all about getting buried in the right place at the right time, as Norman Miller explains So how would you become a fossil? It's not difficult. Just head for your nearest bit of moist sediment, fall over...
In a League of His Own
Robert Ballard, 58, is president of the Institute for Exploration in Connecticut and the former director of the Centre for Marine Exploration. He has participated in more than 100 deep-sea expeditions and has written several best-selling books including...
Late, Great Geographers
Amelia Earhart (1897-1937) Inspirational woman aviator Amelia Earhart achieved much in her life, before tragically disappearing mid-flight Was Earhart always fascinated by flying? Not after seeing her first plane at the age of ten at a state...
Letters
BOOK TO BOOK As a geography teacher, I am constantly looking for new ways to spark student's interest. Recently I have been recommending novels with a geographical flavour to help my students get a feeling for places and cultures. Perhaps readers...
Living Planet
The idea of the Earth as a self-regulating, living organism was once scorned by the scientific community. But over the last 20 years, this holistic view has been gaining ground. Rory Spowers meets James Lovelock, the man behind the Gaia Theory ALTHOUGH...
Malagasy Melting Pot
Photojournalist Chris Hellier takes us on a tour around Madagascar to meet some of the country's 18 ethnic groups The peopling of Madagascar is one of the world's great anthropological adventure stories. How did a people with a range of physical...
Mekong Motivation
By travelling from the mouth to the source of the mighty Mekong river to raise money for Motivation, Ian Gardener and fellow traveller Justin Wateridge were able to help those less physically able than themselves OUR MEETING WITH VANNA gave a clear...
Men of METTLE
The once famed seams of silver from the Cerro Rico mountain in Bolivia have almost run dry. But deep inside the mountain, miners using primitive tools still toil in the sweltering heat. Photojournalist Chris Anderson witnesses the daily grind SQUATTING...
Mystery of the Guanche
Behind the tourist resorts of the Canary Islands is a mystery that has baffled historians and archaeologists alike. Caroline Spence examines the theories behind the arrival of the Guanche, the first inhabitants of the Canaries THERE IS A MAN who...
Out and About
Carolyn Fry takes a guided tour round the Royal Geographical Society (RGS) in London People queuing for concerts outside London's Royal Albert Hall probably have little idea that a few hundred metres away lies the invaluable legacy of the age of...
Pearl Harbours
Black-lipped oysters from the remote Tuamotu archipelago in the South Pacific were once harvested almost to extinction for their mother of pearl. The one in 10,000 chance of finding a `black' pearl would have ensured an early retirement for the lucky...
Pounds on the Ground
Long after the television cameras have left disaster areas, charity organisations continue their relief operations. Nick Ryan examines how charities operate on the ground IN THE LAST FEW DAYS of October 1998, Hurricane Mitch tore through Central...
Pulling to the Pole
In January the first British women's expedition to the South Pole arrived at 90 degrees South. Zoe Hudson shares the secrets of what the team carried with them OUR GEAR WAS a mixture of state of the art and home-made. I thought that from a teamwork...
Quizzical
THE HOLE STORY Q: If it was possible to drill down through the Earth directly below London, where in the world would one surface? A: Assuming that the hole was perfectly vertical and therefore passed through the centre of the Earth, the borehole...
The Ecology of Hollywood
Fifteen million people live in LA, lured by the sun and scenery. But their impact on the environment means their urban life can be closer to hell than heaven, as Rory Spowers reports LOS ANGELES is an unlikely city. Built over a major seismic fault,...