History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 51, No. 6, June

A History of Everyday Things
`HOW GREAT IS THE DEBT HISTORY OWES to the ant-like instincts of collectors ... of the very things that seemed most useless.' The eminent nineteenth-century historian William Stubbs was talking about parish records, but his words could apply equally...
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Britannia Roused: Political Caricature & the Fall of the Fox-North Coalition
David Johnson looks at the art of Sayers and Gillray and the role of pictorial satire in the destruction of a government. In DECEMBER 1783 the coalition government of Charles James Fox (1749-1806) and Lord North was removed from office by George...
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Developing Talent
Anthony Kersting, architectural photographer, describes how his passion for buildings was fuelled by a Middle Eastern posting during the War. IN 1928 WHEN I WAS in my early teens, I purchased my first camera -- a 2A Box Brownie -- and cycled to...
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Fools Are Everywhere
Beatrice K. Otto finds court jesters across the world and in every age. DURING EGYPT'S SIXTH DYNASTY (c. 2323-2150Bc), an official wrote to the Pharaoh Neferkere to let him know he'd found a dancing dwarf. The Pharaoh's response is the first instance...
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Foundation of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts
June 16th, 1701 IN THE LATE SEVENTEENTH century, the Church of England was becoming aware of missionary possibilities and pastoral responsibilities in the British Empire, especially in the Caribbean and the American colonies. Only a handful of clergy...
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Grey Seals
TO CULL OR NOT TO CULL? THE GREY SEAL Halichoerus grypus has become an obvious British example of the problems associated with a nature conservation success in the modern era. We often dwell on nature conservation failures, but conservation successes...
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Growth, Digestion, Decay & Resurrection
Philip Lyndon Reynolds considers the battle between faith and reason in approaching a key subject of human existence. IN THE TWELFTH and thirteenth centuries some scholastic theologians believed that the human body did not incorporate food, and...
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It's Not Cricket
Simon Craig finds that bribery scandals in cricket are nothing new and that even Englishmen are not incorruptible. CRICKET IS NOT FREE from the taint of bribery. Listen to one of the cricketers at the of the scandal: As far as l know, neither...
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James Gillray at Tate Britain
FEW ROYAL PERSONAGES HAVE been subjected to such sustained and vicious pictorial assault as the man who was known variously as Prince of Wales, Prince Regent, and finally George IV. He was the subject of hundreds of caricatures, many scurrilous and...
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Letters
Glacial Response Aubrey Burl suggests that the builders of Stonehenge found the bluestones `a few miles from Stonehenge where there was a convenient glacial deposit'. No glacial deposit, not a single stone transported by ice, has ever been recorded...
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News
According to a genetic study by British and American scientists, contemporary male residents of the Orkney Isles still bear a close resemblance to the Viking invaders of the 9th century. DNA analysis of their Y-chromosomes and those of contemporary...
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Pearl Harbor Revisited
THIS MONTH SEES THE UK LAUNCH of Jerry Bruckheimer's film Pearl Harbor. As Hollywood celebrates in its own inimitable way the impending sixtieth anniversary of the Japanese attack, what lessons have Americans chosen to learn from the history of December...
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Publication of Uncle Tom's Cabin
June 5th, 1851 THE MOST INFLUENTIAL American novel ever written appeared first in weekly instalments between June 1851 and April 1852 in the National Era, a Washington DC periodical with an anti-slavery slant. It was a sensational success and when...
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Stalin & the Photographer
Helen Rappaport tells the story of James Abbe, a little-known American photographer, whose images of the USSR in the 1930s record both the official and unofficial faces of the Stalinist regime. HE CALLED HIMSELF A `tramp photographer', a typically...
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The Act of Settlement
June 12th, 1701 THE DEATH of a frail little boy of eleven of a fever at Windsor at the end of July 1700 had far-reaching consequences. William, Duke of Gloucester, was the only surviving child of Princess Anne and Prince George of Denmark. Now in...
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The Boxers 101 Years On
IN HISTORY TODAY in August and September 2000, Henrietta Harrison and Robert Bickers explored the domestic and global ramifications of the Boxer rising in China. This millennial anti-Christian movement sparked an international response that saw an...
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The Discovery of Second Sight in Late 17th-Century Scotland
Michael Hunter tells how a mysterious phenomenon in the Highlands sparked a debate between scientific virtuosi and urban sceptics, in an episode that helps shed light on the vexed issue of `the decline of magic'. ON THE AFTERNOON OF Thursday, October...
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The Mortgage Strikes
Andrew McCulloch draws attention to an important omission from a recent television reconstruction. WEST WICKHAM, KENT, should be as famous for events in 1938-40 as Jarrow is for its 1936 march. A unique strike took place there which has benefited...
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The Museum of British Pewter
THIS MONTH the first museum of British pewter will be opened in Stratford-upon-Avon. A permanent exhibition is long overdue given that pewter was of primary importance for hundreds of years for use in the home, church and tavern. The museum was made...
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Welsh Chapels in Crisis
ACCORDING TO CAPEL, the Chapels Heritage Society, Welsh chapels are closing at an alarming rate of one per week. This is a real crisis, not just for folks who enjoy rescuing old architecture, but for Wales as a nation. In many ways, Welsh chapels represent...
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