History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 52, No. 3, March

Communing with Nature: Continuing Our Series on History and the Environment, Thomas Dunlap Explores the Development of Quasi-Religious Environmentalism in North America
ANY MOVEMENT THAT BRINGS people out to lie in front of logging trucks, risk jail by tearing up survey stakes, or risk life and limb by running a small boat in front of a whaling ship deserves the attention of historians. Environmentalism has always...
Falklands War Twenty Years on. (Frontline)
THIS YEAR HUNDREDS OF VETERANS of the South Atlantic campaign of 1982 will be returning to the Falklands to commemorate the twentieth anniversary of the conflict. It is inevitable that the celebrations in Stanley, Darwin, Goose Green and Mount Pleasant...
Fighting Outlaws, Returning Wolves: Karen Jones Examines the Significance of the Reintroduction of Wolves into Yellowstone National Park. (Cross Current)
IN JANUARY 1995, a motorcade escorting fourteen caged wolves passed under the Roosevelt Arch, the imposing gateway to Yellowstone National Park, northern Wyoming, in the United States of America. Flag-waving children, camera-wielding press, and emotional...
From Colonial Past to Proud Colourful Present 13 Days for 1,595 [Pounds Sterling]: November 18th - December 1st, 2002. (Tour Barbados with History Today)
Specially arranged for readers of History Today, this two-week trip introduces the island's rich past as well as exploring one of the most friendly and beautiful islands of the Caribbean. Although distinct in many ways from neighbouring islands,...
General Batista Returns to Power in Cuba: March 10th, 1952. (Months Past)
FULGENCIO BATISTA y Zaldivar, an exceptionally competent administrator, a shrewd judge of character and a man of engaging personal charm, was a mulatto from a poor Cuban farming family. He joined the army as a shorthand typist in 1921, rose to the...
History Today Awards 2002. (Frontline)
MEDIEVAL IDEAS about population and the family; working-class reading; reconstruction drawings of medieval sites; aerial photographs of Iron Age remains; Egyptian hieroglyph tutors; rehabilitation of the reputation of a 14th-century lady; film of Iwo...
Home from the Wars: Stephen Brumwell Discusses Attitudes towards Veterans in Mid-Georgian Britain, and the Provisions Made for Them
In March 1759 a pitiful cargo was landed at Portsmouth after a lengthy passage from North America. The consignment comprised some eighty veterans of the 42nd Regiment who had been wounded nine months earlier during a bungled and bloody assault upon...
Kem's Cartoons in the Second World War: Valerie Holman Describes the Little-Known Role Played by the Cartoonist Kem in Assisting the British Propaganda Effort Aimed at Iran
`When War began and the Ministry of Information was formed I was asked to submit some ideas for our propaganda in the Middle East.' Nothing in this laconic recollection from the Egyptian-born political cartoonist Kem (Kimon Evan Marengo, 1907-88)...
Peter Laslett
PETER LASLETT, who died on November 8th, 2001, at the age of eighty-five, pursued more than one career as a professional historian and in each was a pioneer in a field that thrived as a result of the stimulus he gave to it. Laslett was part of a remarkable...
Photographing * the California * Gold * Rush: Robert Lewis Looks at the Historical Evidence Contained within the Daguerreotypes Taken during the 1849 Gold Rush
THE CALIFORNIA GOLD RUSH was the first event to be documented extensively by the new medium of photography. When 200,000 eager fortune-seekers arrived on the Pacific coast in 1849-51, with 100,000 more joining them in the next four years, daguerreotypists...
Publication of the Hound of the Baskervilles: March 25th, 1902. (Months Past)
ARTHUR CONAN DOYLE sent Sherlock Holmes to his death at the Reichenbach Falls in 1893 because he did not want to be known for ever as `the Holmes man'. The public demand for more Holmes stories, however, and the fact that there was patently much more...
Richer for Poorer. (Frontline)
IN AN AMBITIOUS DEPARTURE from the type of buildings and style of historical presentation more commonly associated with the National Trust, this month sees the opening of its latest project, an early nineteenth-century workhouse at Southwell in Nottinghamshire,...
Round and About: March 2002. (Frontline)
London Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka: The Glass Aquarium March 1st to June 30th Design Museum 28 Shad Thames, London SE1 Tel: 020 7940 8790 www.designmuseum.org The fusion of design, craftsmanship and industrial production in the late 19th...
Slavery and the British: James Walvin Reviews Current Ideas about the Vast Network of Slavery That Shaped British and World History for More Than Two Centuries
THE ENFORCED MOVEMENT of more than eleven million Africans onto the Atlantic slave ships, and the scattering of over ten million survivors across the colonies of the Americas between the late sixteenth and early nineteenth centuries, transformed the...
Southern Comfort: Lucinda Lambton Finds Her Namesake, and Much More, in Deepest Mississippi. (Point of Departure)
FOR AS LONG as I can remember I have felt an inexplicably frenzied affinity with America. When a child, it was Lassie who first stirred my heart with her wagging tale; Henry James and Edith Wharton later led me into the higher echelons of literature,...
The Origins of Women's Peace Campaigning: Helen Rappaport Charts the Early Efforts of Campaigning Women to Outlaw War. (Cross Current)
THE UNLEASHING of therecent `war against terrorism' has once more rekindled the pacifist protest of women, a protest that might seem to many a modern-day phenomenon, born of the women's liberation movement of the 1970s. But although such protest has...
The Peace of Amiens Signed: March 25th, 1802. (Months Past)
EARLY IN 1801 the British war against France under Napoleon as First Consul was not going well and the country was sick of it. When the Younger Pitt's government fell in February, the new premier was Henry Addington, who was bent on peace and an end...
Where Does History Come from? Alun Munslow Argues That the Centrality of Narrative to History Undermines Empirical Views of the Subject. (Today's History)
WHERE DOES HISTORY come from? This may seem like an odd question. Surely history comes from the traces of the past that historians find in their sources? However, we might get a different answer if we put the question in another way. What happens if...