History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 53, No. 3, March

Back to Narrative at the History Today Awards. (Frontline)
SIMON THURLEY, Chief Executive of English Heritage, called for a return to narrative history in our schools and heritage sites in his keynote speech at the Longman-History Today Awards, given at the Hilton Paddington (formerly the Great Western Royal...
Cardnal Richelieu: Hero or Villain? Robert Knecht Looks at the `Eminence Rouge' and Considers How His Image, Carefully Crafted during His Lifetime, Has Become That of a Demonic Schemer
AMONG FOREIGN STATESMEN OF the past who are well-known to the average educated Briton, Cardinal Richelieu (1585-1642) occupies an almost unique position. He turns up in the most unlikely places, such as Monty Python's Flying Circus and the children's...
Death of Joseph Stalin: March 5th, 1953. (Months Past)
JUST HOW MANY millions of deaths Joseph Stalin was responsible for is disputed, but that the figure runs into millions is not in doubt. To the end, when he was in his seventies and approaching his own death, his subordinates continued to carry out...
Death of Robert Hooke: March 3rd, 1703. (Months Past)
ONE OF THE most brilliant and versatile figures of his time, Robert Hooke (1635-1703) died a disappointed man. His own law, Hooke's Law, has to do with elasticity, but he brought a piercing intelligence and inventiveness to bear on a remarkable range...
Gazettes-Online: Http://www.gazettes-Online.Co.Uk/
A new source of historical information has been opened up to genealogists, military and family historians and members of the general public with the launch of the redeveloped Gazettes-Online website. The London, Edinburgh and Belfast Gazettes are...
Heraldry and the Medieval Gentlewoman: Maurice Keen Looks at the Significance of Female Lines of Descent in Heraldic Arms, and What This Tells Us about Women of Noble and Gentle Birth in Medieval England
AROUND 1450 RICHARD Strangways, lawyer of the Inner Temple, was putting together a book of notes and comments on heraldry, a subject of keen interest to the gentility of his day. A point came when he wished to include something on marks of cadency,...
History and the Media: Are You Being Hoodwinked? Documentary Film-Maker Martin Smith Calls for Makers of History Programmes for Television to Reassess Their Standards
As 2002 DREW TO A CLOSE I settled down to watch Ben Lewis's award-winning documentary The King of Communism on BBC4. It was both rewarding and disturbing: rewarding, because it brought unfamiliar and telling images to my attention; disturbing because...
Inauguration of President Pierce: March 4th, 1853. (Months Past)
FRANKLIN PIERCE was no one's initial choice as fourteenth President of the United States, not even his own. The Democratic convention of 1852 took forty-nine ballots to settle on him as its candidate after failing to agree on any of the more fancied...
Kulturkampf: The German Quest for Penicillin. (Frontline)
WHEN IN 1928 ALEXANDER FLEMING noticed that a mould had contaminated one of his petri dishes, apparently dissolving the bacteria growing on it, he was shrewd enough to isolate it in order to examine it more closely. The mould turned out to belong to...
Round and About: March 2003. (Frontline)
LONDON `Will the Real Henry VIII please stand up?' February 27th, 5pm Rainolds Room, Corpus Christi College, Oxford www.oup.co.uk/newdnb Eric Ives leads this special seminar in a series organised by the New Dictionary of National Biography....
Sir Robert Dudley: Duke of Northumberland: This Swashbuckling Chancer Lived Two Lives, the First English, the Second Italian. Raymond E. Role Chronicles the Chameleon Career Which Ranges from Elizabethan Privateer, Explorer and Courtier to Stuart Expatriate, Religious Renegade, Shipbuilder, Architect, Inventor, Engineer, Cartographer and Paterfamilias
This swashbuckling chancer lived two lives, the first English, the second Italian. Raymond E. Role chronicles the chameleon career which ranges from Elizabethan privateer, explorer and courtier to Stuart expatriate, religious renegade, shipbuilder,...
Spinning out of Control: Ian Hargreaves Traces the Origins, and Deplores the Impact, of the Unholy Alliance between Public Relations and Politics, Business and Journalism
THE BRITISH GOVERNMENT'S recent announcement of an independent review into government communications is formal acknowledgement of what has been privately recognised within the Blair administration for some time: the culture of spin, which once defined...
The Charting of the Red Sea: Sarah Searight Tells How the Efforts of the Little-Known Robert Moresby, Together with the Innovation of the Marine Steam Engine, Revolutionized Trade and Transport for the British Empire in the Perilous Waterway
THE RED SEA HAS been described as a sea on its way to somewhere else. In other words its shores were not lined with valuable commodities waiting to be exported; instead it was an essential link between the two great commercial zones of the Mediterranean/...
The Mysterious Case of Elizabeth Canning: Bevis Hillier Investigates the Alleged Abduction 250 Years Ago, of a Young Servant Girl, Which Divided London Society at the Time and Has Puzzled Historians Ever Since
ON NEW YEAR'S DAY 1753 an eighteen-year-old London maidservant called Elizabeth Canning was abducted in the City by two ruffians. She was carried off in a carriage to a brothel in Enfield, eleven miles out of London. Here, `Mother Wells', the madam...
The Mystery of Stalin: Paul Wingrove Examines the Starkly Different Interpretations That Seek to Explain the Career of Joseph Stalin, Who Died Fifty Years Ago This Month. (Cross Current)
AMONG twentieth-century statesmen perhaps none was so self-contained, enigmatic, mysterious and unapproachable as the Soviet leader Joseph Stalin. To his closest comrades-in-arms and to foreign statesmen and diplomats he was a man of few words, reticent,...
The Thomas Paine Society. (Frontline)
THOMAS PAINE, the great radical, democrat and secularist, died in Greenwich Village, New York, on June 8th, 1809, and each year, on the nearest Saturday to June 8th, members of the Thomas Paine Society (TPS) gather at noon at the statue of Paine in...
Tired of London? Then Read on ...: Lord Harmsworth Tells How an Accident of Birth Resulted in His Running Dr Johnson's House in London. (Point of Departure)
I LOATHED HISTORY at school! The present and the future were so much more interesting than the past. And it was all about dates and events. Not about people. People are so much more interesting than things. There was an exception: constitutional history....
Who's Our Best Teacher? (Frontline)
TO SUPPLEMENT THE MANY PRIZES for the best history boks, or research, here's a new one that recognises excellence in history teaching in higher education in Britain. But hurry: applications must be in by early March. The National Awards for History...